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Pesticides, Fertilizers, Air & Water Pollution Health: Our Most Important Asset When the well’s dry, we know the worth of water. Ben Franklin Man can.

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Presentation on theme: "Pesticides, Fertilizers, Air & Water Pollution Health: Our Most Important Asset When the well’s dry, we know the worth of water. Ben Franklin Man can."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Pesticides, Fertilizers, Air & Water Pollution Health: Our Most Important Asset When the well’s dry, we know the worth of water. Ben Franklin Man can live about forty days without food, about three days without water, about eight minutes without air, but only for one second without hope. Anonymous Treat the earth well, It was not given to you by your parents, It was loaned to you by your children. Native American Proverb

3 The Problem Discharges into Lakes, Rivers, etc. Harmful Air Emissions Consumption of Hazardous Household Products Family Farms Struggling Due to High Costs of Pesticides and Fertilizers

4 Where will VT be in 20 years if we ignore the problem? California Model: DETERIORATED HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT Increased Cancer Rates Increased Infant Mortality Toxic Water SMOG Loss of Family Farms

5 Where could VT be in 20 years if we address the problem? Slovenia Model: HEALTHIER FAMILIES & CLEANER ENVIRONMENT Decreased Infant Mortality Movement towards Organic Anti-GMO Population - 2 million Vibrant Tourist Industry Recently Seceded

6 Strategies for Behavioral Change Education – Raise Public Awareness Reduce Consumption – Price Adjustments Reuse – “Gray Water” Irrigation Innovation – Sustainable & Eco-Friendly Practices

7 Air Pollution The Problem 1.Most air pollution is from non-point sources. 2.Due to the rural nature of our state, 50% of energy expenditures in VT are for transportation and this accounts for most of the air pollution in the state. 3.This transportation related pollution has been dealt with by the Carbon Tax explained earlier.

8 Air Pollution Air Toxics Program Title V

9 Title V - Construction Basic Fee ScheduleTypeAmountNew Rate Permit ApplicationMajor Stationary$11,500$15,000 Non-Major Stationary$750$1,000 Indirect Source$4,000$5,000 Minor AmendmentClerical$100 Technical$500 Supplemental Fee Schedule for Non- Major Stationary Sources Type AmountNew Rate Engineering Review $1,460$2,000 Air Quality Impact Analysis Screening Model$600 Refined Model$1,170$2,000 Observe and Review Emissions Testing $1,750$2,000 Audit Performance of Ambient Air Monitoring $1,750$2,000 Implement Public Comment Requirement $500

10 Title V - Operating Emitters have to pay for permission to release harmful chemicals into the atmosphere. They pay fees to the state to cover the cost of monitoring their businesses and then get charged by the amount of pollution emitted. Usually by the pound or gallon of chemical.

11 Air Toxics - Definition "Air toxics" refers to 188 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) listed in the Clean Air Act (CAA) of HAPs include industrial chemicals, solvents, metals, pesticides, and combustion by-products. Top 10 air toxics exceed health-based standards in Vermont. 1.Acetaldehyde 2.Formaldehyde 3.Benzene 4.Methylene Chloride 5.1,3-Butadiene 6.Tetrachloroethylene 7.Carbon Tetrachloride 8.Mercury 9.Chloroform 10.Styrene

12 Air Toxics Mobile Sources: On and off road vehicles and aircraft. Area Sources: Burn barrels, gasoline filling stations, woodstoves, paint stripper, surface coatings, drycleaners, industrial boilers, etc. (small stationary sources) Point Sources: Manufacturing operations (large stationary sources).

13 Air Toxics – Management UVM Cargill OMYA Burlington Electric Middlebury College These 218 Point Sources released 11,086 tons of toxics into the air in Vermont during Entities producing more than 5 tons of “criteria” air pollutants must register with the state. These include approximately 218 entities including:

14 Air Toxics Revenues In 2003 VT raised $153,576 in revenues from toxics. Basic Fee ScheduleAmountNew Rate For facilities with emissions greater than 5 tons but less than 10. $ per pound of emissions of SO 2, PM, 00, NOR, or Hydrocarbons $250 plus $0.032 per pound For facilities with emissions greater than 10 tons. $840 plus $ per pound $1,680 $ per pound Hazardous Contaminant Surcharge Fee assessed based on emissions with regard to public health. Please consult the Air Division for type definitions. Excludes emission from the combustion of fuels except for “solid waste” fuel. Type 1: $ per pound emitted Type 2: $ per pound emitted Type 3: $ per pound emitted Type 4: $ 8.40 per pound emitted Excludes emission from the combustion of fuels except for “solid waste” fuel. Type 1: $ 0.08 per pound emitted Type 2: $ 0.84 per pound emitted Type 3: $ 8.40 per pound emitted Type 4: $ per pound emitted Hazardous Contaminant Surcharge on the amount of fuel burned annually. Coal: $0.43perton Wood: $ per ton #6 Fuel Oil: $ per gallon #4 Fuel Oil: $ per gallon #2 Fuel Oil: $ per gallon LPG: $ per gallon Natural_Gas: $0.87 per million ft3 Coal: $0.86perton Wood: $ per ton #6 Fuel Oil: $ per gallon #4 Fuel Oil: $ per gallon #2 Fuel Oil: $ per gallon LPG: $ per gallon Natural_Gas: $1.74 per million ft3

15 Current Water Taxes Water Discharge Fee –Application for discharge permit is $100 –Application review fee ranges from $50 to $30,000 Stormwater Fee –Administrative fee of $100 –Application review fee $300 per acre of impervious surface in a Class B watershed $1170 per acre of impervious surface in a Class A watershed –Annual operating fee $50 per acre of impervious surface in a Class B watershed $235 per acre of impervious surface in a Class A watershed

16 Price Changes Current Water Discharge Fee $100 permit $50-$30,000 review fee Stormwater Fee $100 administrative operating fee $300-$1170 application review fee $50-$235 annual operating fee Revised Water Discharge Fee $300 permit $150-$90,000 review fee Stormwater Fee $300 administrative operating fee $900-$3510 application review fee $150-$705 annual operating fee

17 Water Consumption Fee: Part I First 100 gallons of water used per household will be free (as it already is), but every gallon thereafter will be subject to the 1 cent per gallon fee. Currently an average household consumes about 200 gallons of water per day.

18 Water Consumption Fee: Part II Ease of Administration –Meters already in place on houses. –Meters can easily be placed on wells. Equity –Because the first 100 gallons will be free of charge, only excessive use of water will be taxed. Economy –A Water Consumption Tax will generate an enormous amount of money which can displace other taxes. Environment –Taxation on the consumption of water promotes efficiency and conservative use. It also encourages recycling, reuse, and innovation.

19 Pesticide & Fertilizer Revenues Product registration fee Current $75.00 Proposed $ Dealer’s License & Application Fees for Pesticides $41,000$82,000 Fertilizer product registration $15.00/nutrient max. $30.00/nutrient, max. $ Fertilizer tonnage $.25/ton with a min. of $.50/ton with a min. of $ Total $932,000$3,203,000

20 Sales Tax Exemption for Agriculture 6.0% Sales Tax Exemption for Agricultural Use of Pesticides and Fertilizers Current Revenue Fair Tax Proposal Green Tax Proposal Farmers, Nurseries, Orchards, etc $0.00$1,100,000.00$0.00

21 Total Current -$932,000 Proposed - $3,203,000

22 Benefits of Our Proposed Change Healthier Vermonters Pure Water Fresh Air Increased Tourism Family Farms Flourish In Vermont! The GREEN Mountain State Prevails!

23 Resources


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