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Federal Communications Commission Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau Public Safety Communications Update “View from the FCC” David G. Simpson,

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Presentation on theme: "Federal Communications Commission Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau Public Safety Communications Update “View from the FCC” David G. Simpson,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Federal Communications Commission Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau Public Safety Communications Update “View from the FCC” David G. Simpson, Rear Admiral (Ret.) USN Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau

2 Text-to-911 On August 8, 2014, the Commission adopted a Report and Order which requires that: All CMRS providers and providers of interconnected text messaging services (collectively, “covered text providers”) must be capable of supporting text-to-911 by December 31, All covered text providers must commence delivery of 911 text messages to requesting PSAPs by June 30, 2015, or within 6 months of the date of a PSAP’s request (whichever is later). Covered text providers must route 911 text messages to the appropriate PSAP, using coarse location or other equivalent means. The Commission also adopted a Third Further Notice, which sought comment on: Enhanced location for 911; Roaming support for 911; and Future texting services. 2

3 Text-to-911 Deployment As of August 8, 2014, 121 PSAPS support text-to-911, and at least 48 others plan to go live this year or in early 2015: Available statewide in Iowa, Maine, Vermont, and in a number of jurisdictions in Colorado, Maryland, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, South Carolina, and Virginia. 3 Early adopters have had positive experiences with text-to-911 so far. The Report and Order called for the Commission to establish a centralized database in which PSAPs can declare their text-readiness to covered text providers.

4 E911 Location Accuracy There have been major changes in consumer habits since the Commission first adopted E911 rules. The Commission adopted a Third Further Notice in February 2014, which: Proposed to require CMRS providers to locate callers indoors Horizontally within 50 m for 67% of calls within 2 years of adoption of rules; 80% within 5 years Vertically within 3 m for 67% of calls within 3 years of adoption of rules; 80% within 5 years Sought comment on: Test bed for compliance testing How to leverage commercial LBS and other technology to provide dispatchable address information in the long term Requirements for TTFF; confidence and uncertainty data; identifying the technology used to provide location fix; monitoring E911 data; periodic compliance testing Whether the Commission should expedite transition to unitary standard for outdoor calls PSHSB is actively working on the next item in this proceeding and hopes to adopt some of the proposals from the Third Further Notice by the end of

5 Wireless Alerting and 911 There is a logical nexus between 911 and wireless alerting for emergencies. We want to encourage the full exploitation of wireless alerting protocols and systems that are already in place, or soon will be: Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) Emergency Alert System (EAS) Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) PSAPs are uniquely positioned to make the best use of wireless alerts, and we encourage them to do so. 5

6 911 Governance PSHSB has been investigating the multi-state 911 outage that occurred on Apr. 10, We are also looking into: Vermont statewide 911 outage (Aug. 7, 2014) T-Mobile Outage (Aug. 8, 2014) These incidents provide insight into the challenges for 911 service in an all-IP environment: NG911 transition architectures pose greater risk to 911 reliability than legacy 911 or full NG911. System providers and state/local authorities need to coordinate on respective responsibilities in the event of an outage. 6 The Commission hopes to encourage transparency in operations and accountability during outages as we move toward the Technology Transition. PSHSB will be issuing its report on the outage in the near future.

7 Cybersecurity and 911 The Commission’s core mission is to protect the safety of life and property, and in the modern context, that necessarily includes the security of IP networks. The NG911 environment presents real cyber risks that must be evaluated by PSAPs. The National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) has provided a framework that PSAPs can use to evaluate risk and to develop plans for addressing risk, and we encourage them to do so. Cyber threats are real, and it takes only one hacker to create a major public safety hazard. 7

8 FirstNet and NG911 FirstNet and the ESInets that will support NG911 may be able to use some of the same infrastructure. As the two services are built out, federal, state, and local governments have an opportunity to leverage the limited resources that are available for both. Careful planning will be critical to ensure that these two services can be funded and built out with optimal efficiency, and utilized in parallel. 8


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