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1 Chapter 13 Capital Budgeting: Decision Criteria.

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1 1 Chapter 13 Capital Budgeting: Decision Criteria

2 Capital Budgeting: An Overview Search for investment opportunities. This process will obviously vary among firms and industries. Estimate all cash flows for each project. Evaluate the cash flows. a) Payback period. b) Net Present Value. c) Internal Rate of Return. d) Modified Internal rate of Return. Make the accept/reject decision. – Independent projects: Accept/reject decision for a project is not affected by the accept/reject decisions of other projects. – Mutually exclusive projects: Selection of one alternative precludes another alternative. Periodically reevaluate past investment decisions.

3 Estimating Incremental Cash Flows Only changes in after-tax cash flows that would occur if the project is accepted versus what they would be if the project is rejected are relevant. Initial Outlay: Includes purchase price of the asset, shipping and installation, after-tax sale of asset to be replaced if applicable, additional required investments in net working capital (e.g., increases in accounts receivable and inventory less any spontaneous increases in accounts payable and accruals), plus any other cash flows necessary to put the asset in working order.

4 Differential Cash Flows Over the Project’s Life: Change in revenue - Change in operating expenses = Change in operating income before taxes - Change in taxes = Change in operating income after taxes + Change in depreciation = Differential cash flow

5 Note: Interest expenses are excluded when calculating differential cash flow. Instead, they are accounted for in the discount rate used to evaluate projects. Terminal Cash Flow: Includes after-tax salvage value of the asset, recapture of nonexpense outlays that occurred at the asset’s initiation (e.g., net working capital investments), plus any other cash flows associated with project termination.

6 6 Capital Budgeting Evaluation Techniques – NPV – IRR – MIRR – Profitability Index – Payback – Discounted payback

7 7 Steps in Capital Budgeting Estimate cash flows (inflows & outflows). Assess risk of cash flows. Determine r = WACC for project. Evaluate cash flows.

8 8 Independent versus Mutually Exclusive Projects Projects are: – independent, if the cash flows of one are unaffected by the acceptance of the other. – mutually exclusive, if the cash flows of one can be adversely impacted by the acceptance of the other.

9 9 Cash Flows for Franchise L and Franchise S % L’s CFs: % S’s CFs:

10 10 NPV: Sum of the PVs of all cash flows. Cost often is CF 0 and is negative. NPV = Σ N t = 0 CF t (1 + r) t NPV = Σ N t = 1 CF t (1 + r) t - CF 0

11 11 What’s Franchise L’s NPV? % L’s CFs: = NPV L NPV S = $19.98.

12 12 Calculator Solution: Enter values in CFLO register for L CF 0 CF 1 NPV CF 2 CF 3 I/YR = = NPV L

13 13 Rationale for the NPV Method NPV = PV inflows – Cost This is net gain in wealth, so accept project if NPV > 0. Choose between mutually exclusive projects on basis of higher NPV. Adds most value.

14 14 Using NPV method, which franchise(s) should be accepted? If Franchise S and L are mutually exclusive, accept S because NPV s > NPV L. If S & L are independent, accept both; NPV > 0.

15 15 Internal Rate of Return: IRR 0123 CF 0 CF 1 CF 2 CF 3 CostInflows IRR is the discount rate that forces PV inflows = cost. This is the same as forcing NPV = 0.

16 16 NPV: Enter r, solve for NPV. IRR: Enter NPV = 0, solve for IRR. = NPV Σ N t = 0 CF t (1 + r) t = 0 Σ N t = 0 CF t (1 + IRR) t = 0

17 17 What’s Franchise L’s IRR? IRR = ? PV 3 PV 2 PV 1 0 = NPV Enter CFs in CFLO, then press IRR: IRR L = 18.13%. IRR S = 23.56%.

18 Or, with CFLO, enter CFs and press IRR = 9.70% % NI/YRPVPMTFV INPUTS OUTPUT Find IRR if CFs are constant:

19 19 Rationale for the IRR Method If IRR > WACC, then the project’s rate of return is greater than its cost-- some return is left over to boost stockholders’ returns. Example: WACC = 10%, IRR = 15%. So this project adds extra return to shareholders.

20 20 Decisions on Projects S and L per IRR If S and L are independent, accept both: IRR S > r and IRR L > r. If S and L are mutually exclusive, accept S because IRR S > IRR L.

21 21 Construct NPV Profiles Enter CFs in CFLO and find NPV L and NPV S at different discount rates: rNPV L NPV S (4) 5

22 22 NPV Profile IRR L = 18.1% IRR S = 23.6% Crossover Point = 8.7% S L

23 23 r > IRR and NPV < 0. Reject. NPV ($) r (%) IRR IRR > r and NPV > 0 Accept. NPV and IRR: No conflict for independent projects.

24 24 Mutually Exclusive Projects 8.7 NPV % IRR S IRR L L S r NPV S, IRR S > IRR L CONFLICT r > 8.7: NPV S > NPV L, IRR S > IRR L NO CONFLICT

25 25 To Find the Crossover Rate Find cash flow differences between the projects. See data at beginning of the case. Enter these differences in CFLO register, then press IRR. Crossover rate = 8.68%, rounded to 8.7%. Can subtract S from L or vice versa, but easier to have first CF negative. If profiles don’t cross, one project dominates the other.

26 26 Two Reasons NPV Profiles Cross Size (scale) differences. Smaller project frees up funds at t = 0 for investment. The higher the opportunity cost, the more valuable these funds, so high r favors small projects. Timing differences. Project with faster payback provides more CF in early years for reinvestment. If r is high, early CF especially good, NPV S > NPV L.

27 27 Reinvestment Rate Assumptions NPV assumes reinvest at r (opportunity cost of capital). IRR assumes reinvest at IRR. Reinvest at opportunity cost, r, is more realistic, so NPV method is best. NPV should be used to choose between mutually exclusive projects.

28 28 Modified Internal Rate of Return (MIRR) MIRR is the discount rate which causes the PV of a project’s terminal value (TV) to equal the PV of costs. TV is found by compounding inflows at WACC. Thus, MIRR assumes cash inflows are reinvested at WACC.

29 % % TV inflows PV outflows MIRR for Franchise L: First, find PV and TV (r = 10%)

30 30 MIRR = 16.5% TV inflows PV outflows MIRR L = 16.5% $100 = $158.1 (1+MIRR L ) 3 Second, find discount rate that equates PV and TV

31 31 To find TV with 12B: Step 1, find PV of Inflows First, enter cash inflows in CFLO register: CF 0 = 0, CF 1 = 10, CF 2 = 60, CF 3 = 80 Second, enter I/YR = 10. Third, find PV of inflows: Press NPV =

32 32 Step 2, find TV of inflows. Enter PV = , N = 3, I/YR = 10, PMT = 0. Press FV = = FV of inflows.

33 33 Step 3, find PV of outflows. For this problem, there is only one outflow, CF 0 = -100, so the PV of outflows is For other problems there may be negative cash flows for several years, and you must find the present value for all negative cash flows.

34 34 Step 4, find “IRR” of TV of inflows and PV of outflows. Enter FV = , PV = -100, PMT = 0, N = 3. Press I/YR = 16.50% = MIRR.

35 35 Why use MIRR versus IRR? MIRR correctly assumes reinvestment at opportunity cost = WACC. MIRR also avoids the problem of multiple IRRs. Managers like rate of return comparisons, and MIRR is better for this than IRR.

36 36 Normal vs. Nonnormal Cash Flows Normal Cash Flow Project: – Cost (negative CF) followed by a series of positive cash inflows. – One change of signs. Nonnormal Cash Flow Project: – Two or more changes of signs. – Most common: Cost (negative CF), then string of positive CFs, then cost to close project. – For example, nuclear power plant or strip mine.

37 37 Inflow (+) or Outflow (-) in Year NNN N N N

38 38 Pavilion Project: NPV and IRR? 5,000-5, r = 10% -800 Enter CFs in CFLO, enter I/YR = 10. NPV = IRR = ERROR. Why?

39 39 NPV Profile IRR 2 = 400% IRR 1 = 25% r NPV Nonnormal CFs--two sign changes, two IRRs.

40 40 Logic of Multiple IRRs At very low discount rates, the PV of CF 2 is large & negative, so NPV < 0. At very high discount rates, the PV of both CF 1 and CF 2 are low, so CF 0 dominates and again NPV < 0. In between, the discount rate hits CF 2 harder than CF 1, so NPV > 0. Result: 2 IRRs.

41 41 1.Enter CFs as before. 2.Enter a “guess” as to IRR by storing the guess. Try 10%: 10STO IRR = 25% = lower IRR (See next slide for upper IRR) Finding Multiple IRRs with Calculator

42 42 Now guess large IRR, say, 200: 200STO IRR = 400% = upper IRR Finding Upper IRR with Calculator

43 ,0005,000,000-5,000,000 PV 10% = -4,932, TV 10% = 5,500, MIRR = 5.6% When there are nonnormal CFs and more than one IRR, use MIRR:

44 44 Accept Project P? NO. Reject because MIRR = 5.6% < r = 10%. Also, if MIRR < r, NPV will be negative: NPV = - $386,777.

45 45 Profitability Index The profitability index (PI) is the present value of future cash flows divided by the initial cost. It measures the “bang for the buck.”

46 46 Franchise L’s PV of Future Cash Flows % Project L:

47 47 Franchise L’s Profitability Index PI L = PV future CF Initial Cost $ = PI L = $100 PI S =

48 48 What is the payback period? The number of years required to recover a project’s cost, or how long does it take to get the business’s money back?

49 49 Payback for Franchise L = CF t Cumulative Payback L /80 = years 0 2.4

50 50 Payback for Franchise S CF t Cumulative Payback S /50 = 1.6 years =

51 51 Strengths and Weaknesses of Payback Strengths: – Provides an indication of a project’s risk and liquidity. – Easy to calculate and understand. Weaknesses: – Ignores the TVM. – Ignores CFs occurring after the payback period.

52 CF t Cumulative Discounted payback /60.11 = 2.7 yrs PVCF t % = Recover invest. + cap. costs in 2.7 yrs. Discounted Payback: Uses discounted rather than raw CFs.

53 53 S and L are mutually exclusive and will be repeated. r = 10% Project S: (100) Project L: (100) Note: CFs shown in $ Thousands

54 54 NPV L > NPV S. But is L better? S L CF CF NJNJ 24 I10 NPV

55 55 Equivalent Annual Annuity Approach (EAA) Convert the PV into a stream of annuity payments with the same PV. S: N=2, I/YR=10, PV=-4.132, FV = 0. Solve for PMT = EAA S = $2.38. L: N=4, I/YR=10, PV=-6.190, FV = 0. Solve for PMT = EAA L = $1.95. S has higher EAA, so it is a better project.

56 56 Put Projects on Common Basis Note that Project S could be repeated after 2 years to generate additional profits. Use replacement chain to put on common life. Note: equivalent annual annuity analysis is alternative method.

57 57 Replacement Chain Approach (000s). Franchise S with Replication: NPV = $7, Franchise S: (100) (100) (100) (40) 60

58 58 Compare to Franchise L NPV = $6, ,132 3,415 7,547 4,132 10% Or, use NPVs:

59 59 Suppose cost to repeat S in two years rises to $105,000. NPV S = $3,415 < NPV L = $6,190. Now choose L. NPV S = $3,415 < NPV L = $6,190. Now choose L Franchise S: (100) 60 (105) (45) 60

60 Economic Life versus Physical Life Consider another project with a 3-year life. If terminated prior to Year 3, the machinery will have positive salvage value. Should you always operate for the full physical life? See next slide for cash flows.

61 61 Economic Life versus Physical Life (Continued) YearCFSalvage Value 0($5000)$ ,1003,100 22,000 31,7500

62 62 CFs Under Each Alternative (000s) No termination(5) Terminate 2 years(5) Terminate 1 year(5)5.2

63 63 NPVs under Alternative Lives (Cost of capital = 10%) NPV(3)= -$123. NPV(2)= $215. NPV(1)= -$273.

64 64 Conclusions The project is acceptable only if operated for 2 years. A project’s engineering life does not always equal its economic life.


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