Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Www.hochbegabung-und-gehirn.de Review Article Münte, T.F., Altenmüller, E., & Jäncke, L. (2002). The musician’s brain as a model of neuroplasticity. Nature.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Www.hochbegabung-und-gehirn.de Review Article Münte, T.F., Altenmüller, E., & Jäncke, L. (2002). The musician’s brain as a model of neuroplasticity. Nature."— Presentation transcript:

1 Review Article Münte, T.F., Altenmüller, E., & Jäncke, L. (2002). The musician’s brain as a model of neuroplasticity. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 3, Review Article Münte, T.F., Altenmüller, E., & Jäncke, L. (2002). The musician’s brain as a model of neuroplasticity. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 3, Bonn, Department of Epileptology University of Bonn Medical Centre, Germany  Group work reports Abstract Introduction Subtitles Conclusion Animations Group work reports Abstract Introduction Subtitles Conclusion Animations

2 Composition examples Group work Results Main findings for: Group 1: Background Variables (p. 257) Group 2: Background Variables (p. 258) Group 3: Academic achievement (general and reading) Group 4: Academic achievement (mathematics)

3 Composition examples Group work Discussion (Morrison et al. article): Group 1: General and „Growth of Academic Skills“ 1st, 2nd, and 3rd paragraph Group 2: „Growth of Academic Skills“, 4th and 5th paragraph Group 3: „Question of Background Variables“ Group 4: „Implications“ until „Educational Policy“

4 Main points Abstract Eliciting stimulus→→→→neural changes Professional musicians: ideal model for plasticity Music: complexity of stimuli exposure (practice) reviewed point: brain differences in musicians via neuroimaging

5 Main points Introduction Experience shapes cortical representation: temporal: refers to time cortical: refers to cortex Animal studies: training induced plastic changes Hebbian learning: presynaptic cell → repeated and persistant stimulation → postsyn. cell increase in synaptic strength Wikipedia: Assembly Theory

6 Main points Introduction Problem with animal studies: lack of ecological validity (?) stimuli limitations Understanding human brain plasticity: changes induced by defects Music performance: highly complex human endeavor musical stimulus: complex, multidimensional, multidomain (multisensory) Possible nature vs. nurture explanation

7 Main points Functional measures of plasticity String players: Larger cortical representation of left hand fingers Left hand (“fingering hand”) Greater effect for early beginners Adaptation to own instrument: ↑ responses to own instrument tones plastic changes due to practice

8 Main points Functional measures of plasticity Structural regularities of music Pre-attentive detection of changes MMN ↑ in professional musicians: different facets of music Auditory cortex shaping Conductors’ advantage for spatial auditory processing

9 Main points Anatomical differences Planum temporale, anterior corpus callosum, primary hand motor area, cerebellum Musicians vs. non-musicians: ↑ left planum temporale Primary hand motor area: negative correlation (?) (commencement of musical training and the size of the primary hand motor area)

10 Main points Anatomical differences Corpus callosum: ↑ in musicians (especially if training started before 7 yrs of age) enhanced interaction between the hemispheres: ↓ interhemispheric inhibition (?) facilitation of bimanual coordination Cerebellum: movement timing VBM: ↑grey matter volume in musicians’ motor network

11 Main points Sensorimotor learning Phases of motor learning: Consolidation (several hours) Slow learning (gradual performance increase) Tapping: ↑ M1 activity in musicians within minutes: effect of pre-practice experience ↓ SMA activity in musicians: ↑ efficiency Mental practice!

12 Main points Sensorimotor learning Audio-motor integration (cooperation): Automatized in musicians Apparent in non-musicians with 20 min. of training The effect extended to a mere observation: listening or viewing (auditory or visual) monkey mirror neurons Example ?

13 Main points Maladaptive plasticity „Musicians‘ cramp“ (focal dystonia) Overuse → maladaptive neuroplasticity Dedifferentiation of sensory feedback

14 Main points Musicians as a model? Neurobehavioural changes: from several minutes to lifetime Neuroplasticity: new synapses disinhibitions or inhibitions of neuronal connections Commencement of early training: grey and white matter volume changes not pre-existing differences parallel findings: London taxi drivers

15 Main points Conclusion Musician‘s brain: valuable model of neuroplasticity Questions for future research: training parameters? the role of genes? effect of emotional networks?

16 Task Meeting after next Set up a study trying to answer the following questions: Group 1: music training parameters effect on the brain plasticity Group 2: the role of genes in the music facilitated brain plasticity Group 3: effect of emotional networks on music facilitated brain plasticity

17 Single study article Next meeting Norton, A. et al. (2005). Are there pre- existing neural, cognitive, or motoric markers for musical ability? Brain and Cognition, 59, Presentation (main points): Group 1: Introduction Group 2: Methods and results Group 3: Discussion

18 Sites Animated presentations Brain probe: Map: ap/index.shtml ap/index.shtml reaction time test boxes RT test

19 Department of Epileptology University of Bonn Medical Centre, Germany  Work group: Christian Hoppe Jelena Stojanovic Christian E. Elger Funded by Karg-Stiftung für Hochbegabtenförderung (Frankfurt/M.)


Download ppt "Www.hochbegabung-und-gehirn.de Review Article Münte, T.F., Altenmüller, E., & Jäncke, L. (2002). The musician’s brain as a model of neuroplasticity. Nature."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google