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Secondary PGCE Training for Senior Professional Tutors and Subject Mentors 2015 Mark Jones understand the requirements of the Knowledge for Teaching: Classroom-based.

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Presentation on theme: "Secondary PGCE Training for Senior Professional Tutors and Subject Mentors 2015 Mark Jones understand the requirements of the Knowledge for Teaching: Classroom-based."— Presentation transcript:

1 Secondary PGCE Training for Senior Professional Tutors and Subject Mentors 2015 Mark Jones understand the requirements of the Knowledge for Teaching: Classroom-based Enquiry Assignment

2 Classroom Based Enquiry Please refer to pages 3-10 to 3-14 in the programme handbook to understand the role of the SPT in supporting the trainee or trainees in your school in successfully completing their classroom based enquiry. Key date is for the proposal and annotated bibliography to be reviewed by the SPT between 2 and 13 March, 2015.

3 How do trainees view themselves at the moment ? Implies just one right way of doing things Teachers implement plans handed down Theory is externally pre- determined Values are unquestioned Significance of context is ignored There is more than one way of doing things Teachers plan, implement and evaluate Theory and practice are intimately linked in ‘living educational theories’ Teaching is a values driven activity Practice must take account of context Teacher as technician Teacher as ‘reflective practitioner’ understand why teachers research their classroom practice

4 Distinguishes ‘reflection in action’ and ‘reflection on action’ ‘Reflection in action’ is in the moment and often implicit ‘Reflection on action’ is after the event and is a conscious attempt to improve future action (Schön, 1983) Teacher as ‘reflective practitioner ’ understand why teachers research their classroom practice Image removed

5 reviews current practice in order to identify an aspect to investigate plans a way forward tries it out and consciously notices what happens reviews and evaluates modifies practice as a result (after McNiff, 2002) Teacher as researcher understand why teachers research their classroom practice Image removed

6 ‘The main role of action research is to facilitate practitioners to study aspects of practice – whether it is in the context of introducing an innovative idea or in assessing and reflecting on the effectiveness of existing practice, with the view of improving practice’ (Koshy 2005, p. xii) Action Research understand why teachers research their classroom practice Image removed

7 is practitioner based research has a focus on classroom- based concerns involves intervention is participatory generates deeper understanding of the concern is a form of self-reflective practice relies on a cyclical process (O‘ Leary 2004, p. 141) Action Research ‘Action research is about working towards practical outcomes, and also about creating new forms of understanding, since action without understanding is blind, just as theory without action is meaningless.’ (Reason and Bradbury, 2001, p.2 cited by Koshy, 2005, p.9) understand why teachers research their classroom practice

8 Action Enquiry Cycle (UWE, 2014, pp to 3-14) be ready to plan one cycle of a small scale classroom-based enquiry and select appropriate research methods

9 Identify a theme or area of interest. What can I choose?

10 Refining the theme into a specific question to investigate Russian Doll principleGoldilocks test Getting to the very heart of what it is you are researching. Involves phrasing and rephrasing your question to narrow down the investigation. Is the question too big or too small? Is it too hot or too cold? Is it just right? be ready to plan one cycle of a small scale classroom-based enquiry and select appropriate research methods How can I encourage Year 7 students to adopt an enquiry approach in lessons? How can I improve Year 9 lower ability students’ knowledge and application of key mathematical vocabulary? Image removed

11 What evidence could be collected to show the current situation? be ready to plan one cycle of a small scale classroom-based enquiry and select appropriate research methods Critically review a range of recent literature and research related to the theme.

12 An intervention is a small change in your practice e.g. implementing a new idea, approach or strategy with one class, a small group of pupils or an individual pupil. be ready to plan one cycle of a small scale classroom-based enquiry and select appropriate research methods Plan a small scale intervention to try out in the classroom. What is an intervention? Use key questions instead of levelled objectives in six lessons during geography of crime topic with 7B during April, Try three different ‘key word’ starters over first 3 weeks of lessons with Year 9 (set 4) after Easter.

13 Carry out the intervention be ready to plan one cycle of a small scale classroom-based enquiry and select appropriate research methods Collect evidence during and after the intervention to inform evaluation of the impact Geography of Crime What types of crime occur in our area? Where do most crimes occur in our locality? Why are some parts of our locality safer to live than others?

14 Analysis to see what impact the intervention has had on the class/group/individual be ready to plan one cycle of a small scale classroom-based enquiry and select appropriate research methods

15 Evaluate: draw conclusions from your analysis of the data. What have you learnt about your practice and what might you try next? be ready to plan one cycle of a small scale classroom-based enquiry and select appropriate research methods understand issues of access, ethics, validity, and generalisability Validity and generalisability aim to avoid bias use triangulation to substantiate conclusions recognise the limitations of the enquiry outcomes do not assume transferability of findings

16 JanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMayJuneJuly UWEUWE ICtICt UWE BUWEUWE B Buweuwe BB B BB Buweuwe Im Ct uweuwe UWE ITE Secondary Training Programme 2014 – 2015 Knowledge for Teaching Classroom Based Enquiry: Module Component B: Written evaluation 3750 words (appendices: includes the proposal template and annotated bibliography) Deadline Thurs 28 May 2015 mmmmmmmmm OOO O O SSSSSSSSS m S O O Mentor meeting SPT meeting Lesson observation (mentor) Lesson observation (UWE tutor) Level 3 Assignment Level M Assignment Review Points RP 5 days 28 Jan 1 Feb S 5 days Feb OO O O O RP3 Training Review days March 34 days 13 April 21 May O O O RP4 5 days June 22 May Proposal 10 days Feb 23 days 23 Feb – 19 March be ready to plan one cycle of a small scale classroom-based enquiry and select appropriate research methods Proposal Carry out intervention 10 days 1-12 June Knowledge for Teaching Classroom Based Enquiry: Module Component A Presentation of proposal and annotated bibliography ( words) Comp. A equivalent to 1250 words Between 2 and 13 March 2015

17 JanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMayJuneJuly UWEUWE ICtICt UWE BUWEUWE B Buweuwe BB B BB Buweuwe Im Ct uweuwe UWE ITE Secondary Training Programme 2014 – 2015 Knowledge for Teaching Classroom Based Enquiry: Module Component B: Written evaluation 3750 words (appendices: includes the proposal template and annotated bibliography) Deadline Thurs 28 May 2015 mmmmmmmmm OOO O O SSSSSSSSS m S O O Mentor meeting SPT meeting Lesson observation (mentor) Lesson observation (UWE tutor) Level 3 Assignment Level M Assignment Review Points RP 5 days 28 Jan 1 Feb S 5 days Feb OO O O O RP3 Training Review days March 34 days 13 April 21 May O O O RP4 5 days June 22 May Proposal 10 days Feb 23 days 23 Feb – 19 March be ready to plan one cycle of a small scale classroom-based enquiry and select appropriate research methods Proposal Carry out intervention 10 days 1-12 June Knowledge for Teaching Classroom Based Enquiry: Module Component A Presentation of proposal and annotated bibliography ( words) Comp. A equivalent to 1250 words Between 2 and 13 March 2015

18 Access and ethics All work must be undertaken within an explicit code of ethics, as specified in BERA (2011) guidelines In undertaking action research, the primacy of your professional responsibilities as a teacher must always be respected You do not need the permission of pupils, colleagues and parents to undertake action research that is close to normal reflective practice However, it is helpful to share elements of your project and process with pupils and colleagues to promote shared ownership of the improvement of learning Any participant has the right to withdraw from providing additional time or information to your enquiry, beyond what is part of their normal relationship to you as a teacher, and they need to be informed of this at the outset You must endeavour to protect participants from educational, physical and psychological harm at all points in the research You are required to ensure confidentiality/anonymity of participant identity and data, beyond that already in the public domain understand issues of access, ethics, validity and generalisability

19 Example of part of an annotated bibliography ( words) Bartlett, S. and Leask, M. (2009) Improving your teaching: an introduction to practitioner research, reflective practice and evidence-informed practice. In. Capel, S., Leask, M. and Turner, T. eds. (2009) Learning to Teach in the Secondary School A companion to school experience 5 th ed. London: Routledge, pp The authors stress the phrase ‘evidence-informed’ practice which moves the teacher beyond reflective practitioner and encourages their use of research and data to critically reflect on their teaching. The chapter helped me to understand why practitioners often use action research. The chapter introduced the range of data collection methods available to teacher researchers and clarified for me the importance of keeping a research diary or reflective journal during the research process as a source of data. The definitions of quantitative and qualitative data (p.306) led me to realise that the latter would be the main source of evidence in my small-scale enquiry. Additionally this chapter provided a useful table on ethical considerations which I adapted into a checklist to support my ethics statement in my proposal. Black, P., Harrison, C., Lee. C., Marshall, B. and Wiliam, D. (2002) Working inside the Black Box Assessment for Learning in the Classroom London: nferNelson This booklet was written based on research into assessment practices in six secondary schools in two local authorities and followed the Inside the Black Box (1998) publication. I found this booklet very accessible as it was aimed at classroom practitioners and presented strategies to support ‘Assessment for Learning’, for example approaches to questioning. Of particular relevance for my enquiry was the discussion about ‘open’ and ‘closed’ tasks and their relative inclusion in different subjects (p.17). In addition the final section of the booklet reinforced for me the importance of discussion with colleagues during the implementation of new initiatives and changes in practice. This prompted me to discuss my proposed intervention with the class teacher and subject mentor. Word count 243 words (excluding titles)

20 JanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMayJuneJuly UWEUWE ICtICt UWE BUWEUWE B Buweuwe BB B BB Buweuwe Im Ct uweuwe UWE ITE Secondary Training Programme 2014 – 2015 Knowledge for Teaching Classroom Based Enquiry: Module Component B: Written evaluation 3750 words (appendices: includes the proposal template and annotated bibliography) Deadline Thurs 28 May 2015 mmmmmmmmm OOO O O SSSSSSSSS m S O O Mentor meeting SPT meeting Lesson observation (mentor) Lesson observation (UWE tutor) Level 3 Assignment Level M Assignment Review Points RP 5 days 28 Jan 1 Feb S 5 days Feb OO O O O RP3 Training Review days March 34 days 13 April 21 May O O O RP4 5 days June 22 May Proposal 10 days Feb 23 days 23 Feb – 19 March be ready to plan one cycle of a small scale classroom-based enquiry and select appropriate research methods Proposal Carry out intervention 10 days 1-12 June Knowledge for Teaching Classroom Based Enquiry: Module Component A Presentation of proposal and annotated bibliography ( words) Comp. A equivalent to 1250 words Between 2 and 13 March 2015

21 Community of teacher-researchers Action research works best when there is collaboration between peers in support of the enquiry Peer support presupposes a willingness :  to listen to each other and provide feedback  to make constructive suggestions to address issues  to share ideas and resources  to provide a safe space to take risks  to agree a mutual way of working together  to maintain confidentiality around discussions Peers provide ‘critical friendship’ in this process

22 Reference List BERA (2011) Revised Ethical Guidelines for educational research [online] Available from: [Accessed 4 February 2013]. Burton, D. and Bartlett, S. (2005) Practitioner Research for Teachers. London: Sage Furlong, J. and Maynard, T. (1995) Mentoring Student Teachers: The Growth of Professional Knowledge. Abingdon: Routledge. Hitchcock, G. and Hughes, D. (1995) Research and the teacher. London: Routledge. Koshy, V. (2005) Action Research for improving practice: a practical guide. London: Paul Chapman Publishing Maykut, P. and Morehouse, R. (1994) Beginning qualitative research. A philosophic and practical guide, London: Falmer Press. McNiff, J. (2002) Action research for professional development: concise advice for new action researchers [online] Available from: [Accessed 25 January 2013].http://www.jeanmcniff.com/ar-booklet.asp O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Schön, D. (1983) The Reflective Practitioner: how professionals think in action. Aldershot: Ashgate. Wlison, E. ed. (2009) School-based research: a guide for education students. London: Sage.

23 Directed study task: Watch the following 13 minute video clip How does the teacher share her research ideas with the pupils? What are the ethical considerations in this research? How is student voice data collected? What is the informing theory/ perspectives behind the research? Is the teacher part of a community of practice? What evidence of critical analysis of student voice data is there? How reliable is the data? Learning /


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