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Professional Program and Graduate School Teaching Certificate Programs John Pedey-Braswell Pharmacy 577 Summer 2004.

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Presentation on theme: "Professional Program and Graduate School Teaching Certificate Programs John Pedey-Braswell Pharmacy 577 Summer 2004."— Presentation transcript:

1 Professional Program and Graduate School Teaching Certificate Programs John Pedey-Braswell Pharmacy 577 Summer 2004

2 Perspective 2003 AFPE Publication December 2002 AACP Survey of 84 Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy: –67 Responses. –Total of 417 Vacant Teaching Posts (223 Pharmacy Practice, 190 Pharmaceutical Science). 94.3% were full-time positions. –More than 40% of these positions had been unfilled for 6 months to 2 years. –37% of current faculty are age 50 or older. –24% of deans are age 60 or older.

3 The Pharmacist as Educator: Implications for Practice and Education - Evan T. Robinson, PhD American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 2004; 68 (3) Article 72. “ By redefining the pharmacist as an educator, I am not suggesting that we require registered pharmacists to have teaching certificates. I do believe, however, that the basics of teaching and learning can be taught to pharmacists and pharmacy students alike to foster an appreciation of their role as educators within the healthcare system and to take the practice of pharmacy to the next level.”

4 Two Types of Teaching Certificates Residency-Based Graduate School- Based

5 Searching the Literature MEDLINE Search (English Language): MESH Terms – Education, Professional; Pharmacy Education, Graduate; Teaching Materials; Educational Models; Programmed Instruction; and Free-Text Search for Teaching Certificate*. IPA Search (broad strategy – no limits) CINAHL Search (English language, ) ERIC Search (English language, ) –Permutations including: Educat$, Pharmac$, Profession$, Certificat$, Curriculum, Staff Development, Professional Advancement, Residency, and Teach$. Google Search “Teaching Certificates” to find out what other academic programs have done.

6 Common Elements of Residency-Based Certificates Examples: Kentucky, Arizona, Wisconsin, St. Louis, Purdue. Likely grew out of need to meet ASHP educational standards for residency programs. Didactic Instruction via evening or weekend seminars or workshops. Teaching Experience such as lectures or small-group facilitation. +/- Teaching Portfolio (usually required). Completed within 1 year’s time.

7 Common Elements of University Graduate School- Based Teaching Programs Examples: Wisconsin, Florida State, Michigan State, Oklahoma, Syracuse, etc. (mention learning centers, e.g. CIDR) Designed to augment graduate student’s pre- thesis or pre-dissertation coursework. Required (full quarter or semester) classroom- based didactic instruction in topics such as theory, learning models, teaching law and ethics, and utilizing technology. Instructional practicum – usually in candidate’s field of expertise. Teaching portfolio required. May or may not include elective courses.

8 Teachers: Evaluating Teaching Using the Best Practices Model William C. Lubawy, PhD American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 2003; 67 (3) Article 87. Possess knowledge or command of material Establishes comfortable and conducive learning environment Creates enthusiasm for topic Explains concepts clearly Understandable instructional style Inherent fairness and common sense Presents self as “real person” – can say I don’t know Treats others with respect Sense of humor and confidence

9 Courses: Evaluating Teaching Using the Best Practices Model William C. Lubawy, PhD American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 2003; 67 (3) Article 87. Concentrates on the essential material Provides evidence of relevance Utilizes a variety of contemporary instructional techniques (such as active learning) Develops critical thinking, problem solving, information integration skills Promotes attitude of life long learning Designed for appropriate class level and place in curriculum Purposeful in duplication, but not redundant Clear and fair expectations Exams reflect the material taught in class Detail oriented (useful syllabus, punctual start times, etc.)

10 Key Elements for Teaching Certificate Program (lit. search, readings, and MEDED course) Teaching Strategies for Lectures, Group Discussions, Preceptorship Activities (Microskills) Creating Appropriate Questions for Discussion and Testing Self-Evaluation and Peer-Evaluation of Teaching Strengths and Weaknesses Reflective Exercises, Personal Teaching Philosophy and Portfolio Adult Learning Theory How to Deal with Difficult Students Panel Discussion with Faculty on How to Develop and Maintain a Course Develop and Deliver Instructional Material – Videotape and Critically Review Presentation Practice Teaching Psychomotor Skills (IV Room Instructors?)

11 2002 AACP Publication: Encouraging Student Interest in Academic Careers Butler – Academic Rotations for P4 Students –Elective Course: Teaching to Learn/Learning to Teach –State-wide Residency Teaching Conference Massachusetts College of Pharmacy – Academic Rotations for P4 Students Mississippi – TA Program for Students Samford – Academic Rotations for P4 Students

12 The State of Teaching Instruction at UWSOP Needs assessment ed to likely benefactors Spring Significant interest from pharmacist-preceptors, fellows, residents, and professional students. Increasing number of Pharm.D. students volunteering to be TAs for PHARM 334 and 440. Strong demand from residents to find teaching opportunities. Students utilizing teaching rotations during P4 year. Currently offer a patchwork assortment of workshops and courses: –Dr. O’Sullivan (resident and preceptor workshops) –Dr. Odegard (workshop for residents teaching therapeutics lab) –Dr. Hammer (faculty development workshops) –Dr. Dawson (PHARM 495 teaching skills course) –MEDED courses and teaching scholars program available

13 Foundation and Conceptual Framework for a Teaching Certificate Program for Professional and Graduate Students, Residents, Fellows, and Practitioners Dana Hammer, Karan Dawson, Nanci Murphy, Teresa O’Sullivan, Peggy Odegard University of Washington School of Pharmacy OBJECTIVE Upon completion of this certificate program, the participant is expected to be able to: 1.Discuss the history and future of pharmacy education, 2.Identify and evaluate references and resources for pharmacy faculty to aid in their teaching, 3.Create and deliver an instructional module, 4.Assess the learning value of that module or other instructional activity, 5.Utilize a variety of instructional methodologies and assessments to facilitate learning, 6.Design appropriate grading systems, 7.Utilize a variety of educational research and measurement techniques, 8.Evaluate and discuss specific education journal articles of interest to the participant, 9.Complete and present an education- related capstone project, 10.Create a comprehensive portfolio to demonstrate achievement of rotation outcomes. In order to be an approved certificate program at the University of Washington, the Graduate School has several requirements (http://www.grad.washington.edu/Ac ad/GradCertificate.htm): Establish Advisory Board of UW faculty and representatives of the professional community where appropriate. Instructors of courses must be UW faculty. Admissions Processes and Standards must be in place to ensure selection, quality and suitability of participants. Program Scope/Curriculum and Standards must be organized into a structured progression of classes, and include a capstone or equivalent unifying experience that provides intellectual cohesion to the program. Program must consist of no less than 15 credit hours, 9 of which must be in 500-level courses and above, and 9 of which must be graded. Students must maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA in program courses. Approval/Review Process of the Graduate School must be applied to and approved in order to offer and maintain the program. Proposals for new Graduate Certificate Programs must follow the Higher Education Coordinating Board guidelines, and be approved by the Graduate School Council and UW Board of Regents. PROPOSED CURRICULUM OTHER REQUIREMENTS GRADUATE SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS Design a teaching certificate program to prepare pharmacy educators for the rigors of academic teaching, and to help inspire others to consider academic careers. PROGRAM OUTCOMES 1.Capstone project: longitudinal project begun in Fall; should include a measurement aspect; brd members serve as individual project mentors 2.Program portfolio: students will be required to demonstrate achievement of program outcomes via creation of a portfolio. This portfolio should be started in the Fall to be completed in the Spring, with periodic (2/qtr) review + feedback from mentor 3.Campus workshops: related to teaching/learning; offered through pharmacy or other program; 1 per quarter IMPLICATIONS Enhance the teaching skills of instructor/practitioners, graduate and professional students, residents and fellows Inspire participants to pursue careers in academia Serve as model for other programs developing similar initiatives Fall QuarterWinter QuarterSpring Quarter Pharm 4XX: Introduction to College Teaching and Pharmacy Education (3 cr, graded) Hammer/Dawson Pharm 5XX: Seminar in Pharmacy Education (1 cr, graded) Murphy/Odegard Pharm 5XX: Seminar in Pharmacy Education (1 cr, graded) O’Sulllivan/Hammer Pharm 599: Independent Research (1 cr, P/F) Board Members MedEd 522: Research in Medical Education (2 cr, P/F) Scott or Other MedEd 520: Teaching Methods in Medical Education (2 cr, graded) Ambrozy MedEd 521: Evaluation of Learning in Health Sciences Education (3 cr,graded) Carline Pharm 579: Teaching Practicum (2 cr, P/F, Winter or Spring) Board 6 CREDITS4 to 6 CREDITS5 to 7 CREDITS Total required credits for program: 17* * Must be completed between 1 and 3 years

14 UW Requirements for Certificate Programs Establish Advisory Board of UW faculty and representatives of the professional community where appropriate. Instructors of courses must be UW faculty. Admissions Processes and Standards must be in place to ensure selection, quality and suitability of participants. Program Scope/Curriculum and Standards must be organized into a structured progression of classes, and include a capstone or equivalent unifying experience that provides intellectual cohesion to the program. Program must consist of no less than 15 credit hours, 9 of which must be in 500- level courses and above, and 9 of which must be graded. Students must maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA in program courses. Approval/Review Process of the Graduate School must be applied to and approved in order to offer and maintain the program. Proposals for new Graduate Certificate Programs must follow the Higher Education Coordinating Board guidelines, and be approved by the Graduate School Council and UW Board of Regents.

15 Proposed Curriculum Hammer, Dawson, Murphy, O’Sullivan, Odegard 2003 AACP Annual Meeting Fall QuarterWinter QuarterSpring Quarter Pharm 4XX: Introduction to College Teaching and Pharmacy Education (3 cr, graded) Hammer/Dawson Pharm 5XX: Seminar in Pharmacy Education (1 cr, graded) Murphy/Odegard Pharm 5XX: Seminar in Pharmacy Education (1 cr, graded) O’Sulllivan/Hammer Pharm 599: Independent Research (1 cr, P/F) Board Members MedEd 522: Research in Medical Education (2 cr, P/F) Scott or Other MedEd 520: Teaching Methods in Medical Education (2 cr, graded) Ambrozy MedEd 521: Evaluation of Learning in Health Sciences Education (3 cr,graded) Carline Pharm 579: Teaching Practicum (2 cr, P/F, Winter or Spring) Board 6 CREDITS4 to 6 CREDITS5 to 7 CREDITS Total required credits for program: 17* * Must be completed between 1 and 3 years

16 Other Requirements for the Certificate Hammer, Dawson, Murphy, O’Sullivan, Odegard 2003 AACP Annual Meeting Capstone project: longitudinal project begun in Fall; should include a measurement aspect; board members serve as individual project mentors. Program portfolio: students will be required to demonstrate achievement of program outcomes via creation of a portfolio. This portfolio should be started in the Fall to be completed in the Spring, with periodic (2/qtr) review + feedback from mentor. Campus workshops: related to teaching/learning; offered through pharmacy or other program; 1 per quarter.

17 Why Should We Pursue This Program? 2004 UWSOP Strategic Priorities - #1: Be a Leader in Pharmacy Education. Program would be proof of our commitment to innovation and leadership in pharmacy education. Has potential to reach a wide target audience – new instructors, post-grads, fellows, residents, graduate and professional students. Hopefully provide continuation of skilled faculty lineage (your legacy to the profession). Minute cost/benefit ratio – largest cost is faculty time and maintaining enthusiasm/support for program. Most certificate programs report heightened awareness amongst faculty and preceptors for the importance of teaching skills. Literature shows faculty who receive support with teaching report increased job satisfaction → faculty retention.

18 Recommendations Start Department and SOP approval process working toward UW graduate school approval of certificate. Orchestrate the teaching instruction currently in place. Bring all parties together into one community for discussion, support, and uniformity. Make students and other participants aware of educational opportunities on campus. Make teaching a school-wide priority. Encourage periodic peer-observation of teaching styles.

19 In Conclusion… “The Board” is committed to going forward with a graduate school model, open to those who wish to pursue the certificate. Would like faculty and administrative support to gain wider involvement in the program (word-of-mouth advertising, teaching mentors, collaborators, etc.).

20 Questions? Comments? Concerns? Let the Grilling Commence!


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