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SIKHISM. The Origins of Sikhism: Intro Where did Sikhism start? Who was Guru Nanak?

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Presentation on theme: "SIKHISM. The Origins of Sikhism: Intro Where did Sikhism start? Who was Guru Nanak?"— Presentation transcript:

1 SIKHISM

2 The Origins of Sikhism: Intro Where did Sikhism start? Who was Guru Nanak?

3 Key Figures  Sikh tradition tells us that in Sikhism Gurus are not to be worshipped as they are not God but are teachers who show the way to God. All together there are 11 gurus in Sikhism. Guru Nanak being the first guru and the Last being Guru Granth Sahib!

4 The Guru Granth Sahib  The last ten gurus were humans. This Guru is a sacred collection of texts. It is a preservation of the teachings of the ten previous Gurus.  The Guru Granth sahib is the holy scripture in Sikhism  Sikhs look to this book for guidance in their lives.  Sikhs believe it is a Divine Revelation

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6 How Sikhs treat the sacred text  The Guru Granth Sahib is given the same respect that was shown to the human Gurus during their lifetimes.  In the Gurdwara it is put to bed in its own room every evening.  At the beginning of the day the Granthi (reader), and any other Sikhs present, form a procession to carry the Guru Granth Sahib to its position on the Manji in the Diwan hall (the room where worship takes place) of the Gurdwara.  never placed on the ground and Sikhs never turn their back on it.  While being read by the appointed reader of the scripture, a special fan, called a chauri, is waved over the pages.

7 The Five K’s Dated from the creation of Khalsa Panth by Guru Gobind Singh, 1699 They were introduced for a number of reasons …  The symbols help identify members of the Khalsa  Aiding strength as a community  Each K has a particular meaning and represents a particular symbol Instruction from the Guru is enough of a reason for many Sikh’s to wear the 5 K’s The symbols have been seen to increase in power throughout Sikh history In adoption of the 5 K’s ritual Sikh’s are believed to remember that every warrior, saint or martyr since 1699 and every member or Khalsa are united 0.20 – 2.10 …

8 Kesh – Uncut Hair There are a number of reasons for Sikh’s keeping hair uncut …  Hair is considered a symbol of holiness and strength and has been throughout history  Part of God’s creation, a symbol of accepting God’s gift as he intended it  Adoption of a simple life, denial of pride in appearance  Moving beyond concerns of the body and attain maturity in Spirit  A Sikh is to bow his head to no other than the Guru including the barber  Also a visible symbol of membership to the community Sikh women are also forbidden to cut hair and trim eyebrows Sikh men are forbidden to trim their beards.

9 Kara – Steel Bracelet  Symbolising that a Sikh is linked to the Guru  A reminder not to do anything the Guru wouldn’t approve  God has no beginning or end  Permanent bond to the community, a link in the chain of Khalsa Sikhs  Made of steel, not gold or silver, it’s not an ornament

10 Kanga – Wooden Comb  Representing a clean mind and body, keeping the hair neat  Symbolises the importance of caring for the body, something God has created. Does not conflict with their aim to move beyond bodily concerns, the body should be cared for appropriately.

11 Kacha – Special Underwear  These must not come below the knee  Thought to be a useful garment for Sikh warriors of 18 th & 19 th centuries especially for warfare on horses  Also a symbol of chastity

12 Kirpan – Ceremonial Sword This can be anything from 3 inches to 5 foot long, kept in a sheath Can be worn over and under clothing It is considered to symbolise …  Defence of good  Defence of the weak  Struggles against injustice  Spirituality  Soldier saints  Metaphor for God

13 Worship Sikhs believe in one God so only worship one God To many Sikhs God is abstract  Cant be physically described  Self exists in everyone’s souls  Is only ‘seen’ by those God has blessed This abstraction means most Sikhs worship God without the use of images or statues Instead Sikhs look upon their holy text, the Guru Granth Sahib for guidance. The Guru Granth Sahib is highly respected. When not in use it is covered by a piece of silk called a Romalla. Sikh worship can be public or private: Private worship can be at any day, any time, anywhere Sikhs aim to pray at least 3 times a day, morning, evening and before going to sleep It is important to allow no distractions so that prayer is effective Prayer is spending time with God who, although abstract, is seen as a caring friend Public congregational worship is special to Sikhs Public worship takes place in a Gurdwara and can be led by any Sikh, male or female

14 THE GURDWARA THE GURDWARA MEANS- THE GATEWAY TO THE GURU A FLAG CALLED THE NISHAN SAHIB IS ALWAYS FLOWN AT EVERY GURDWARA ANY PLACE WHERE THE GURU GRANT SAHIB (HOLY BOOK) IS, IS A SIKH PLACE OF WORSHIP. SIKHS TAKE THEIR SHOES OFF WHEN ENTERING AND BOW TO THE GURU GRANT SAHIB WHEN WORSHIPPING SERVICES ARE GENERALLY HELD ON SUNDAYS AND ARE BASED ON THE VERSES FROM THIS HOLY TEXT DURING WORSHIP SIKHS BELIEVE IT IS RESPECTFUL FOR SOMEONE TO SIT BEHIND THE GURU GRANTH SAHIB HOLDING A CHAURI SIKHS CHANT AND PRAY TOGETHER WHICH IS KNOWN AS KEERTAN EVERY SERVICE ENDS WITH A SHARED MEAL WHICH IS KNOWN AS LANGA

15 Vaisakhi  Vaisakhi is the Sikh new year, where Sikhs celebrate the founding of the Sikh community in 1699 = this is called Khalsa  It is usually on the 13 th or 14 th of April  This is the most important festival in Sikhism  It was originally the harvest festival in Punjab The story behind Vaisakhi:  In 1699 Guru Gobind Singh came out of a tent carrying a sword requesting for anyone who is prepared to give their life for their religion  A young Sikh volunteered & went into the tent, the Guru then came out with blood on the sword  He asked for another volunteer and then this was repeated another 4times until a total of 5 Sikhs went in to the tent  The 5 Sikhs then appeared alive out of the tent with turbans on  These 5 were known as the Panj Piare ‘beloved five’  They became the first 5 members of the Khalsa (Sikh community)


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