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Hawaiian Language Medium Education – Act 133 2004 Patricia Hamamoto, Superintendent Pila Wilson, Ph.D., UH Hilo Namaka Rawlins, CEO, Aha Punana Leo April.

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Presentation on theme: "Hawaiian Language Medium Education – Act 133 2004 Patricia Hamamoto, Superintendent Pila Wilson, Ph.D., UH Hilo Namaka Rawlins, CEO, Aha Punana Leo April."— Presentation transcript:

1 Hawaiian Language Medium Education – Act Patricia Hamamoto, Superintendent Pila Wilson, Ph.D., UH Hilo Namaka Rawlins, CEO, Aha Punana Leo April 25, 2007

2 Outcomes Understanding of: The Hawaiian Language Medium Education requirement History of Hawaiian Language Medium Education Example: Nawahiokalani’opu’u School Next Steps

3 What is total Hawaiian Medium? Everything in Hawaiian…Administration, secretaries, play ground talk, even in English classes Like going to a special place… imbued with pride, structure, culture, traditions, symbols, ritual…a learning place P-20 Learning environment..all in Hawaiian

4 Hawaiian Medium Education is not new David Malo, First DOE Superintendent ( ) All Hawaiian Public School System, the second oldest in the nation started in 1841

5 Iosepa Nawahi ( ) Legislator, Lawyer, newspaper publisher, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Artist…product of Hawaiian Public School system To age 11 Kaimu, Puna Common school (Hawaiian Medium) To age 15 Hilo Boarding (Hawaiian Medium w/ English as second language) To age 19 Lahainaluna (Hawaiian Medium w/ English and Greek as second languages) To age 20 Royal School (English Immersion)

6 At the time of annexation in 1898, the average literacy rate* in Hawaii was high! *Literacy in their Mother tongue Hawaiian84% (31% in English also) Part-Hawaiian91% (76% in English also) Portuguese28% Other Caucasian86% Chinese49% Japanese54%

7 Historical Perspective 1841 – Hawaii DOE – Hawaiian Medium 1896 – Hawaiian Medium System Closed – Hawaiian Forbidden 1893 Monarchy deposed 1930’s –Hawaii Creole English -Mark of lower socio -Economic class Educational Achievements of Native Hawaiians plummet 1980’s – Hawaiian Literacy lower than 100 years earlier

8 1984 – Punana Leo Preschools begin Beginning to restore a language, a culture and pride 1986 – State removes Ban on Hawaiian in schools 1987 – Emergence Of Hawaiian Immerson Classrooms in Hilo, And Oahu 1989 – State Funds Hawaiian Immersion curriculum in Hilo 1990’s – Creation of Hawaiian Immersion schools 2004 – Act 133 Hawaiian Language Medium Education Act

9 An example that it can be done! Nawahiokalani’opu’u Laboratory School

10 First Impressions

11 For the record…Students Open to all regardless of ethnicity – about 200 students Over 95% Hawaiian 60% Free and Reduced Lunch Primary home languages –Hawaii Creole English (majority) –Hawaiian (fastest growing) –Standard English –French 100% graduation rate since first class in 1999 Greater than 80% college attendance – like Stanford, Oxford, Loyola Marymont, Seattle University, UH, etc K-12…even a nursery, day-care center for 1-4 year olds

12 Curriculum All classes taught through Hawaiian Early reading using old DOE method of reading by syllables beginning in Punana Leo preschool College preparatory curriculum Early enrollment at UH- Hilo for seniors Attention to heritage languages: –Grades 1-6: reading Hawaiian with Chinese characters Japanese –Grades 5-12: English (Standards based DOE language arts) –Grades 7-9: Latin (focus on comparative grammar of Latin, Hawaiian, standard English, Hawaii Creole English, Vocabulary building and language history

13 Curriculum Continued Hula, Hawaiian music and chanting Hands on practicum: –Raising and preparing foods –Herbal medicine –Raising pigs for year end luau and profit –Swimming and fishing

14 Seamless infrastructure with family values ingrained – the older students help the younger ones Private Punana Leo Nursery & Day-Care K-6 Charter School 7-12 DOE Public School part of Hilo High/ Inter

15 Act 133 provides an opportunity for expansion Nawahi is the “exemplar” for this kind of educational opportunity in the US “ The impact of the Hawaii Language Medium Education System will be immense for the number of Native language programs throughout the country that are closely following the Hawaiian model” Akira Y. Yamamoto, Ph.D. Professor of Anthropology and Linguistics University of Kansas, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Co-chair, Unesco Ad Hoc Group on Endangered Lauguages

16 The model at Nawahi is fundamental in education…. Provide children a grounded framework for learning: rituals, culture, safety, symbols Gaining stakeholder support from the Community at large to instill pride Maintain data driven striving for Continuous Improvement in Academic achievement/ Life skills Systematically implement the goal of a global citizen

17 Next Steps Expand and research Nawahi as a prototype Hawaiian Medium School Develop a supportive and inclusive Hawaiian Medium Education structure Utilize some of Nawahi innovations in English Medium schools Offer Hawaiian language for free in all DOE Adult Community Education schools


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