Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Background This report summarizes research to understand consumer comprehension and opinions of online privacy protection. This research was conducted.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Background This report summarizes research to understand consumer comprehension and opinions of online privacy protection. This research was conducted."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Background This report summarizes research to understand consumer comprehension and opinions of online privacy protection. This research was conducted by Ipsos MediaCT. Study markets Data sourceSample sizeAudienceFieldwork dates USA Online omnibus panel Total of 1015 interviews Adults aged 18 or olderNovember 15-18, 2012

3 Executive Summary Forty-five percent say they feel they have little or no control over the personal information companies gather about them while they are browsing the Web or using online services such as photo sharing, travel or gaming. Thirty-two percent report they always consider a company’s privacy reputation, track record and policies when choosing which websites to visit or services to use. When consumers have questions about protecting their privacy, most equally consult friends and family and a website’s privacy statement (39% and 39% respectively) followed by a company’s privacy policy (29%). When it comes to the most trusted sources of privacy information, consumers trust friends and family most (33%) followed by industry privacy or consumer organizations (25%) and a website’s privacy statement (22%).

4 No Control A Quarter of US Adults Feel They Have Little/No Control over Personal Info Shared Online Almost a quarter of adults (24%) said they have little to no control over the personal information they intentionally share online through retail transactions, , or social media. 37% feel that they have only moderate control, while four in ten (39%) feel that they have significant or total control. Men are more likely to feel less control over personal information shared compared to women. Younger (18-34) and less affluent (<$50K) adults are most likely to believe that they have more control over their data online. Control over personal information I share online Q1. How much control do you feel you have over the personal information you intentionally share online through activities like online retail transactions, or social media? Little Control 14%25%37%19% 5% Moderate ControlTotal Control Male Female Age Age Age 55+ Under $50K Over $50K 16%23%34%22% 6% 13%26%40%17% 4% 20%24%39%15% 2% 12%25%38%21% 5% 12%25%34%22% 8% 19%22%37%16% 6% 11%26%36%22% 4% 24% 39% Significant Control

5 Half of US Adults Feel They Have Little/No Control over Personal Info Collected Online Nearly half of US adults surveyed (45%) feel they have little or no control over the personal information companies gather from them online. Those aged and 55+ are among those who are most likely to say they have little control or no control over the data companies gather from their online activities. Consistent with their feelings about control of data shared voluntarily, younger (18-35) and less affluent (<$50K) adults are most likely to believe that they have more control. Control over information gathered by companies Q2. How much control do you feel you have over the personal information companies gather while you are browsing the web or using online services such as photo sharing, travel, gaming, shopping, etc.? 9%12%34%33% 12% Male Female Age Age Age 55+ Under $50K Over $50K 10%13%32%31% 14% 8%11%35% 11% 15% 38%26% 6% 10%35%36% 13% 6%12%29%37% 17% 12%13%32%31% 11% 6%12%35% 13% No ControlLittle ControlModerate ControlTotal 45% 21% Sig. Control

6 Understanding How to Protect Privacy Online Varies by Age Q6. How well do you understand how to protect your privacy online? Less than half of US adults (40%) “mostly” or “totally understand” how to protect themselves online. Aligning with the perception of control over their data online, older adults (55+) are the least likely (30%) while younger users (18-34) are the most likely (50%) to understand of how to protect their privacy online. Understand How to Protect Privacy Online 11% 29%40%17% 4% No IdeaMinimallyModerately UnderstandTotallyMostly Understand 20% 40% Mostly or Totally Understand How to Protect Privacy Online

7 Most Actively Protect Their Privacy Online The vast majority of US adults (85%) have taken steps to protect their online privacy, most commonly by deleting cookies (65%). Many have also opted out of targeted advertising (44%), uninstalled an app (41%), or confirmed or changed their browser setting to request that websites don’t track them (39%). Older respondents (55+) are least likely to delete cookies, uninstall an app, or confirm or change browser settings and change to a different website or online service. Q9. Which of the following actions, if any, have you taken to help protect your privacy online? 65% 44% 41% 39% 21% 20% 15%

8 A Third of Adults Always Consider Privacy Issues when Choosing an Online Service While over half of adults (54%) sometimes consider privacy reputation, track record or policies when choosing which websites to visit or online services to use, a third (32%) always do so. Men are more likely then women (16% vs. 11%) to say that they never take a company’s privacy reputation into consideration when choosing which websites and online services to use. Q3. Do you consider a company’s privacy reputation, track record or policies when choosing which websites to visit or which online services to use - such as, photo sharing, travel, gaming, shopping, etc.?

9 Sources for Questions re Protecting PrivacySources of Guidance Trust Most TotalMaleFemale TotalMaleFemale Website privacy statement39%40%38%42%41%35%22%21%23% 21% Friends and family39%32%45%41%36%39%33%29%36%34%32%31% Company privacy policies29%27%31%33%31%23%20%17%22%23%20%17% Ind. privacy or consumer org21%26%15%20%24%17%25%29%22%21%29%26% News sites12%14%11%21%10%6%10% 9%14%10%5% Government agencies10%12%9%12%10%8%15%14%16%20%13%12% None of the above15%17%12%14%15% 17%19%15%16% 18% Website Privacy Statements & Friends/Family Consulted, Friends/Family Trusted Most Q7. If you have questions about how to protect your privacy online, where do you typically go for answers? Q8. What sources of guidance about protecting your privacy online do you trust most? Website privacy statements and friends/family are equally consulted when U.S. adults have questions about protecting their online privacy (39% and 39%, respectively). Although low, men are more likely than women not to use any sources (17% vs. 12%) and women are more likely to turn to friends and family for guidance (45% vs. 32%). Younger adults are more than twice as likely to consult news sites with privacy questions, and older adults (55+) are least likely (23%) to turn to company privacy policies. When it comes to trust, a third say they trust friends/family (33%) the most with women more likely than men to trust friends and family (36% vs. 29%) and men more likely to trust independent organizations (29% vs. 22%). Younger adults are more likely to trust gov’t agencies while older adults are least likely (5%) to trust news sites.

10

11 Respondent Profile

12

13 To learn more about what Microsoft is doing to help protect your privacy visit: microsoft.com/yourprivacy microsoft.com/yourprivacy © Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. This material is provided for informational purposes only. Microsoft makes no warranties, express or implied.


Download ppt "Background This report summarizes research to understand consumer comprehension and opinions of online privacy protection. This research was conducted."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google