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Maximizing Learning in a Multi-Generational Setting Professor Michael Hunter Schwartz Washburn University School of Law Neil Howe & William Strauss, Millennials.

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Presentation on theme: "Maximizing Learning in a Multi-Generational Setting Professor Michael Hunter Schwartz Washburn University School of Law Neil Howe & William Strauss, Millennials."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Maximizing Learning in a Multi-Generational Setting Professor Michael Hunter Schwartz Washburn University School of Law Neil Howe & William Strauss, Millennials Rising 48 (Vintage 2000)

3 Overview I. I.Goals for presentation II. II.Generational learning differences A. A.What are generations B. B.Generational learning differences and their implications for design of CLE III. III.Why adapting to the needs of the younger generations will also benefit those in the older generations IV. IV.Training the trainers V. V.Praxis (design exercise)

4 Goals for Presentation You will...   Understand the learning needs and preferences among CLE attendees from a generational perspective   Be able to adopt approaches and make design decisions that meet the needs of all CLE attendees * *

5 Overview I. I.Goals for presentation II. II.Generational learning differences A. A.What are generations B. B.Generational learning differences and their implications for design of CLE III. III.Why adapting to the needs of the younger generations will also benefit those in the older generations IV. IV.Training the trainers V. V.Praxis (design exercise)

6 What are generations? Birth year within a 15-20 year range Similar experiences during childhood and young adulthood in terms of major public events and parenting experiences Share common beliefs and behavior Self-perceived to be a generation

7 Silent Generation (now ages 64-81) Boomers (now ages 46-63) X Generation (now ages 25-45) Millenials (a/k/a Y generation) (now ages 1-24) Which generations attend CLE?

8 Overview I. I.Goals for presentation II. II.Generational learning differences A. A.What are generations B. B.Generational learning differences and their implications for design of CLE III. III.Why adapting to the needs of the younger generations will also benefit those in the older generations IV. IV.Training the trainers V. V.Praxis (design exercise)

9 What differences have you observed?

10 Differences per Experts and Their Design Implications 1. 1.“Meaningful” activities a. a.Differences i. i.Knowing why ii. ii.“Just in case” learning vs. “Just in time” learning b. b.Implications 2. 2.Attendee Attention and the Role of High Tech and Visuals 3. 3.Group Work 4. 4.Feedback 5. 5.Expect Multi-Modal Instruction

11 New generation learners want to know why they are learning what they are learning New generation learners prefer to learn “just in time” instead of “just in case” Importance of Meaningful Activities “I do have a test today...It’s on European Socialism. I mean, really, what’s the point? I’m not European. I don’t plan on being European. So who gives a crap if they’re socialists? They could be fascist anarchists.” --Ferris Bueller in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off

12 Implications of the Need for Meaningful Activities Disclose objectives (define what they will know and be able to do) Schedule CLE based on existing projects Redesign CLE programming away from the “show and go” model Goals

13 Differences per Experts and Their Design Implications 1. 1.“Meaningful” activities 2. 2.Attendee Attention and the Role of High Tech and Visuals a. a.Differences i. i.Attention differences ii. ii.View of technology differences b. b.Implications 3. 3.Group Work 4. 4.Feedback and Instructor Contact 5. 5.Expect Multi-Modal Instruction

14 Focused Attention Differences: Introduction The Environment The Senses See, hear, feel, etc. Start Selective Attention Long-Term Memory Working Memory End Retrieval Encoding Response Generator

15 More easily distracted Focused Attention Differences

16 Used to higher levels of stimulation (e.g., edutainment) Used to quickly decoding visual metaphors (music videos) Possible Myth: New generation learners can more effectively multi-task

17 High Tech Expectations What have you bought for me lately?

18 Implication: Use Note-Taking Guides to Increase Focus See handout for this presentation Increases focus because attendees are gathering the information Also (incidentally) increases retention

19 Implication: Use Imagery to Create Visual Metaphors for Concepts Intervening Causes Duress Damages inadequate if: 1. Uncertain OR 2. Irreplaceable contract subject OR 3. Uncollectible

20 Implication: Use PowerPoint   Millennials trained to use it   Xers and Millenials expect it   Maximizes instructional time by speeding communication of key ideas and problems D1 negligently treats P’s heart condition, such that P, while resting his arms on a railing as he was viewing the Grand Canyon, suffers a severe heart attack. At that same moment, D2 negligently bumps into P such that P falls over into the canyon and dies when he hits the ground. An autopsy reveals P died from crashing to the canyon floor but would have died anyway from the heart attack. Discuss P’s claims against D1 and D2.

21 Implication: Integrate Music and Video Learned Hand’s B { "@context": "http://schema.org", "@type": "ImageObject", "contentUrl": "http://images.slideplayer.com/14/4314622/slides/slide_21.jpg", "name": "Implication: Integrate Music and Video Learned Hand’s B

22 Implication: Use “The Clickers” W and S entered into the Widgetwerks contract. For each of the first two months of the contract, S submitted a Statement of Charges for S’ expenses, many of which had not received prior approval. W paid both in full. In the third month, S again submitted a statement that included expenses which had not received prior approval. W’s CFO refused to pay the invoice, truthfully stating the prior payments had been the result of “a secretarial error.” S’ best argument that W must pay the third statement is: a.Course of performance b.Estoppel c.Waiver d.Bad faith *

23 Instant Messaging Live Discussion: October 3, 2006 – Tuesday: 9:25 AM - 10:55 AM 10/3/2006 9:58:15 AM Tollefson says: The horse may have run into the railing either way. However, if the railing had been painting, the startled horse may have seen it, and stopped before running into it. 10/3/2006 9:58:54 AM Herrington says: Yes; but for the fence not being white, the accident likely would not have happened 10/3/2006 9:59:04 AM Shinkle says: No, the horse bolted from the race; he probably would have jumped the railing if he saw it 10/3/2006 9:59:10 AM Tucker says: they paint rails to allow horses to see them 10/3/2006 9:59:20 AM Ratcliffe says: Maybe not, because this event still could have occurred if the fence had been painted. something else could have been wrong with the horse; the jockey could have better controlled the horse. 10/3/2006 9:59:36 AM Kohls says: it was a violation of a reg.... like Cay 10/3/2006 9:59:58 AM DeLaughder says: that’s breach... not causation 10/3/2006 10:00:55 AM DeLaughder says: but for D’s negligence, the horse would have seen the rail and not turned into an exit the horse behaviorally was used to using 10/3/2006 10:01:46 AM Hendrix says: and the D knew horses 'knew' that was a point of exit, thus, they should have known or foreseen that a horse may try to exit that way

24 Differences per Experts and Their Design Implications 1. 1.“Meaningful” activities 2. 2.Attendee Attention and the Role of High Tech and Visuals 3. 3.Group Work a. a.Differences b. b.Implications 4. 4.Feedback and Instructor Contact 5. 5.Expect Multi-Modal Instruction

25 Used to and Comfortable with Small Group Work They actually want to work in small groups?

26 Best Practices for Avoiding Dysfunction in Small Group Activities Defined, narrow, realistic task Assigned roles Adequate facilities Optimal size groups Mobile instructor

27 Differences per Experts and Their Design Implications 1. 1.“Meaningful” activities 2. 2.Attendee Attention and the Role of High Tech and Visuals 3. 3.Group Work 4. 4.Feedback and Instructor Contact a. a.Differences b. b.Implications 5. 5.Expect Multi-Modal Instruction

28 Expect High Quality Feedback and Instructor Contact More work for us?

29 Ideas for Integrating Feedback into CLE Experiences  The “Clickers”* *  Feedback  From instructor  From peer or by self with guidelines or model answer  Small Groups (intervene in discussions)

30 Differences per Experts and Their Design Implications 1. 1.“Meaningful” activities 2. 2.Attendee Attention and the Role of High Tech and Visuals 3. 3.Group Work 4. 4.Feedback and Instructor Contact 5. 5.Expect Multi-Modal Instruction a. a.Differences b. b.Implications

31 Multi-Modal Instruction What is it and why should we bother?

32 Ideas for Expanding the Modalities of CLE Instruction Adopt many of the techniques demonstrated here Integrate “Cognitive think-aloud” demonstrations Integrate problems and illustrations, especially movie and television clips Sequence teaching format changes across the entire presentation Computerize some CLE training so it can be accessed day or night

33 Overview I. I.Goals for presentation II. II.Generational learning differences A. A.What are generations B. B.Generational learning differences and their implications for design of CLE III. III.Why adapting to the needs of the younger generations will also benefit those in the older generations IV. IV.Training the trainers V. V.Praxis (design exercise)

34 Why Attendees in the Older Generations Also Will Benefit Arousal and memory Active learning vs. passive learning Lessons from the Constructivist Learning Theorists Lessons from expertise research

35 Overview I. I.Goals for presentation II. II.Generational learning differences A. A.What are generations B. B.Generational learning differences and their implications for design of CLE III. III.Why the “new” techniques are effective with all learners regardless of generation IV. IV.Training the trainers V. V.Praxis (design exercise)

36 Ideas for Training the Trainers Technology training and support Importance of also explaining the “whys” Adopt, for your training, the techniques you are recommending Online training [Ideas for motivating the trainers to change is an entirely different issue.]

37 Design a Multi-Generational CLE


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