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All Minds Don’t Think Alike Differentiated Instruction Strategies Jacque Melin

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1 All Minds Don’t Think Alike Differentiated Instruction Strategies Jacque Melin

2 Goals for Today Brief overview of the philosophy of differentiated instruction Strategies Anchor activities (tic tac toe boards & learning menus) Tiered assignment The “Profiler”

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5 Using your non-dominant hand, write this number from memory

6 “Currently, students are required to adapt... to the prevalent teaching practices, instructional materials and assessment instruments. Those who can’t adapt are viewed as being deficient in their ability to learn.” Marie Carbo, Educating Everybody’s Children

7 Let’s try again but use your dominant hand and think of...

8 Discovery of the New World Minutes / hours / days Month/date for Valentine’s Day

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11 DI is not... One size fits all

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13 The biggest mistake of past centuries in teaching has been to treat all children as if they were variants of the same individual and thus to feel justified in teaching them all the same subjects in the same way. Howard Gardner

14 Pre-Assessment

15 Question #1 I have attended at least one presentation on the foundations and key principles of differentiation.

16 Question #2 My comfort level related to knowledge about the key principles of differentiation is high.

17 Question #3 If asked to identify at least three elements of differentiated instruction, I could name at least three.

18 Question #4 I am using at least three differentiation strategies regularly in my classroom.

19 What exactly does the term “differentiation” mean? List words or phrases that, in your mind, are linked to this term.

20 TTYN Turn to Your Neighbor 1.Turn to the person sitting next to you and reflect on the term “differentiation” 2.What terms did you have in common? 3.What terms were different?

21 Definition? “A flexible approach to teaching in which the teacher plans and carries out varied approaches to content, process, and product in anticipation of and in response to student differences in readiness, interests, and learning needs” Carol Ann Tomlinson

22 Ya got something simpler!?

23 “... an appropriate teacher response to learners’ needs.”

24 Why aren’t you differentiating?

25 You cannot discover new oceans unless you have the courage to lose sight of the shore. G You cannot discover new oceans unless you have the courage to lose sight of the shore.

26 Differentiation – 3(4) sets of 3(4) 1. On-Going Assessment 2. Flexible Grouping 3. Choices 1.Readiness 2.Interest 3.Learning Profile 1. Content - INPUT (what I want them to learn) 2. Process (how I want them to learn) 3. Product - OUTPUT (how they show me what they know) 4. Environment (offers opportunities for different ways of learning)

27 Planning Choices for a Differentiated Lesson INPUT PROCESSOUTPUT  Reading  Textbook selections in audio format  Teacher presentation (may be pre-recorded).  Video  Other approved Helps you study   Cornell notes   Create flashcards   Outline or summary  Think Dots (partner)  3 Anchor Activities  Other approved  Exit Cards  Quizzes/Tests  Profiler Activity – 5 different choices  Research Project  Other approved Receive the information Evidence of meeting the standard

28 Differentiation – 3 sets of 3 1. On-Going Assessment 2. Flexible Grouping 3. Choices 1.Readiness 2.Interest 3.Learning Profile 1.Content 2.Process 3.Product

29 DOTSDOTS Read each item #1-7. Look at the answer circles at the bottom of the page. Use a colored marker that matches the answer you choose for each item. I have attended at least one presentation on the foundations and key principles of differentiation. Blue dot—yes Red dot—no My comfort level related to knowledge about the key principles of differentiation is: Blue dot—high Yellow dot—average Red dot—low If asked to identify three elements of differentiation, I could: Blue dot—name three Yellow dot—probably name one or two Red dot—I don’t know the elements of differentiation Differentiation is applicable for meeting the needs of Blue dot—all of the following groups Yellow dot—groups of students will varying multiple intelligences, strengths, and special interests. Red dot—groups of students with varying ability/readiness levels and learning styles. I have read Differentiation for Mixed Ability Classrooms or How to Differentiate for Mixed Ability Classrooms by Dr. Carol Ann Tomlinson. Blue dot—yes Yellow dot—excerpts from at least one book Red dot—no I am using at least three differentiation strategies regularly in my classroom. Blue dot—yes Yellow dot—I am familiar with the strategies but do not use them regularly Red dot—no On-going assessment is Blue dot—something I use daily to plan effective instruction with flexible grouping practices. Yellow dot—something I use weekly to plan effective instruction for my classroom activities. Red dot—is very traditional and is used more for grades than for planning daily/weekly

30 Other types of pre-assessments Quick Write - might sound very ordinary, but as a pre-assessment it can reveal a lot by asking a ‘big idea’ question; student answers can uncover what they understand, what misconceptions they may have, or the reasoning processes they are using. They are given only 1-3 minutes to write an answer (thus 'quick write') Example: "How do electrical devices work?" Graphic Organizer - there are so many - you might want to consider a Venn diagram, a word/idea web, a cause/effect chart, a flow-chart, a sequence chart; something you’ve used as a pre-write; (KWL is really common, so don’t use for this assignment please). Word Splash Activity - content vocabulary is placed on a board, chart, large paper in a random ‘splash’. Students are asked to use the words in sentences, a paragraph, captioned drawing, or diagram. Cloze Writing - fill in the blank using a vocabulary bank Line Continuum - usually used with 5-10 agree/disagree or true/false statements about the upcoming topic/unit; students place themselves on a continuum line about what level of comfort they may have with answering the question; for each question there usually is new movement. Graffiti Wall - Use large butcher paper and title it with a theme or big idea or topic from unit (i.e. Ancient Greece) Students over a certain amount of time (a day-a week) write thoughts/ideas/opinions that come to mind regarding the title. Have them initial each. Keep track of what students record. The graffiti wall then can be used throughout the unit by adding new information, correcting misconceptions, categorizing, developing vocabulary, etc. for you to listen to later.

31 Other types of pre-assessments Yes/No Cards - Students make a large index card with Yes (or "Got It") on one side, No ("No clue") on the other side. Teachers ask an introductory or review question. Students who know the answer hold up the Yes card, if they might have the answer they hold the No card. Then do a quick Think/Pair/Share. This short assessment can give a quick look at what the group is ready for/understands/'gets'. Example: Use when introducing vocabulary words that students need as a knowledge base for a specific unit of study. Entrance Cards- As students enter for the day give them a small index card and ask them to respond to a displayed sentence or short paragraph which shares a specific idea that will be taught during the unit displayed in the room. They might ask questions or add more information to the displayed statement. Square Off/or 4 Corners - Place a card in each corner of the room labeled as: No Path, Rocky Path, Smooth Path, and Paved Path. Teach them the meaning of the analogy of "path" in their learning. Make a statement or ask a question about the topic/unit of study (i.e. "The moon has no gravity.") Instruct the students to go to the corner of the room that matches their comfort level with what they are thinking or where they are with the statement. As a group, those in each corner discuss what they know about the statement/question. Briefly visit each corner to listen to their conversations or they can record the conversations onto an audio tape

32 Pre-Assessing Using Graphic Organizers Define it…Give an example… Give a non-example…Ask a question about it…

33 Entry Cards: Earth Science Name: Draw the orbit of the Earth around the sun. What causes the seasons? Why is it warmer in the summer than in the winter?

34 Exit Cards: Earth Science Name: Draw the orbit of the Earth around the sun. What causes the seasons? Why is it warmer in the summer than in the winter? Did your opinion about any of these things change as a result of today’s class?

35 Exit Card Name Question: Rate yourself: 1 = high confidence 2 = medium confidence 3 = I’m not sure on this Would you help someone else learn this? YES Not at this time On-going Assessment Explain how you would use a strategy (from this presentation) that you could use in YOUR classroom.

36 Place Gender Dot here— Red = female, Blue = male Circle one (from survey results) Visual—Auditory—Kinesthetic Circle one (from survey results) Analytical—Practical—Creative Circle one (from survey results) VL—LM—VS—BK—M—N—Intra—Inter List: Favorite Subjects Personal Interests Flexible Grouping: Pre-Assess - Learning Profile

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38 Differentiation – 3 sets of 3 1. On-Going Assessment 2. Flexible Grouping 3. Choices 1.Readiness 2.Interest 3.Learning Profile 1.Content 2.Process 3.Product

39 Philosophy of Differentiation includes structuring classrooms so there are provisions for: Different ways to take in, work with, and learn information (implies flexible grouping and choices {theirs/yours}) Different approaches due to language acquisition, cultural differences, readiness (implies flexible grouping and choices {theirs/yours}) Differing amounts of time to complete work (implies a need for anchor activities)

40 Guidelines for managing flexible groups… Before grouping students for any activity, ask yourself: “What is the learning outcome of this activity and what is the best type of grouping to meet the outcome?” Then group students accordingly.

41 Guidelines for managing flexible groups… P – Pairs or Partners A – Alone (individualized work, independent studies) L – Large group (whole class) S – Small group (homogeneous (ability grouping) or heterogeneous (mixed ability)

42 Guidelines for managing flexible groups… Use some kind of record- keeping so you and your students will know at a glance who is in each group for a particular activity.

43 Jacque

44 #1___________ #2___________ #3___________ #5___________ #4___________ Who’s in YOUR learning network?

45 Guidelines for managing flexible groups… Give explicit instructions about the task each group is going to do.

46 Guidelines for managing flexible groups… Present The Opposing Position  Working as a pair, present the opposing pair’s position persuasively.  Be as sincere as you can even if you do not agree with the position.  Add any new facts you know.  Elaborate their position by relating it to other information you have previously learned. 10 minutes Prepare Your Position  Plan with your partner how to advocate your position.  You and your partner will visit the Media Center to find resources that support your position. Remember to use a variety of sources, including books, reference materials, and the Internet. The Media Specialist will be able to assist you with your searches.  Plan a persuasive presentation that will be at least 5 minutes in length.  Use the SAC template to organize your presentation. Make sure you and your partner master your position and present it in a clear way so that the rest of your group clearly comprehends your position. 40 minutes

47 Guidelines for managing flexible groups… Defend & Discuss  Argue for your position, presenting as many facts as you can to support your position.  Listen critically to the opposing pair’s position asking them for facts to support their point of view.  Present counterarguments and ask for clarification for pieces you do not understand.  You will need to know both sides of the issue to write a good report. Remember that this is a complex issue, with some emotion involved. You will need to be respectful of one another’s positions. 15 minutes Present The Opposing Position  Working as a pair, present the opposing pair’s position persuasively.  Be as sincere as you can even if you do not agree with the position.  Add any new facts you know.  Elaborate their position by relating it to other information you have previously learned. 10 minutes Reach A Consensus  Summarize and synthesize the best arguments for both points of view.  Reach a consensus on a position that is supported by the facts and includes the opinions of all group members.  Write a group report (1-2 paragraphs) that reflects the consensus that has been met. Be sure to include the information you found to support your consensus. 15 minutes 10 minutes

48 Guidelines for managing flexible groups… Classroom rules and procedures for group work should be written, posted and understood by all!

49 Group members are expected to… Share duties and supplies equally. Cooperate with one another by using positive language and pleasant voices. Take turns listening to other members speak Show respect to one another by being polite and giving positive comments for work well done. Help one another with any difficulties experienced. Work together to come up with one good idea, presentation or project. Keep personal records of the time spent in the group.

50 Guidelines for managing flexible groups… Practice, practice, practice… Getting into groups Moving chairs and/or desks for group work Monitoring/dealing with noise level in the classroom Distributing, collecting, storing material Stopping groups and returning to the whole class.

51 Guidelines for managing flexible groups… Have Anchor Activities ready, available and organized.

52 Differentiation – 3 sets of 3 1. On-Going Assessment 2. Flexible Grouping 3. Choices 1.Readiness 2.Interest 3.Learning Profile 1.Content 2.Process 3.Product

53 Rapid Robin The “dreaded early finisher”

54 “I’m Not Finished” Freddie It takes him an hour-and- a-half to watch 60 Minutes

55 One premise in a differentiated classroom: “ In this class we are never finished--- Learning is a process that never ends.”

56 Anchor activities are: Ongoing assignments that students can work on independently throughout a unit, a grading period or longer.

57 The Purpose of an Anchor Activity is to: Provide meaningful work for students when they finish an assignment or project, when they first enter the class or when they are “stumped”. Provide ongoing tasks that tie to the content and instruction. Free up the classroom teacher to work with other groups of students or individuals.

58 Work best: When expectations are clear and the tasks are taught and practiced prior to use. When students are held accountable for on task behavior and/or task completion.

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60 Tic-Tac-Toe Boards

61 Best Idea for Constructing these… Easier or something presented at the beginning of unit More challenging Easier or something presented at the beginning of unit

62 Matter - directions 1. Pick any square(s) on the board for your project. 2. You should pick enough squares to total 40 points. Example any square 7, 8, or 9 = 40 points OR square = 40 points (for example). 3. You may go over the number of points. For example doing squares 1, 2, and 3. The extra will be counted for extra credit (up to 10 points can be earned). However, you must have met the requirements of the square and have a quality product(s). 4. Turn this sheet in with your project(s) and label with your name and hour.

63 Matter 1. Create a collage of an element. Include the name of the element and its atomic number and uses in our daily lives. For example: Gold – include pictures of jewelry and other uses. 2. Make a set of 51 flash cards using all the bold vocabulary from Chapters 1, 2, and 3. Write or type word on one side and the definition on the other side. 3. Complete all Chapter Reviews for Chapters 1, 2, and 3. Write our questions and answers. Use p. 30, p. 54 and p. 80 – all items. 4. Create a poster explaining the difference between the 4 classes of matter. Give examples and use pictures for each class. 5. Your choice – must be approved before you begin. 6. Give a class demonstration on a physical and chemical change. Have all approved supplies ready. Have enough supplies so students in class can repeat demonstration. 7. Write and illustrate a children’s story of the journey of a water drop going through different phases. Read the book to the class. 8. Make up a song that you would perform for us. Use vocabulary from Chapter 1, 2, or 3, but your song should explain vocabulary or concepts. 9. Make a board game using at least 35 of the 51 vocabulary words in Chapters 1, 2 and

64 Algebra Choice Board 1. Summarize the most important information about linear functions and put it to a beat. 2. Draw the sequence of events to graph a linear equation on a timeline. 3. Create a way to remember how to graph linear equations given in standard form. 4. Reflect on the application of linear functions to something in your life in your journal. 5. WILD CARD !!! Your choice after getting approval. 6. Create a series of at least six cartoon frames to capture the most important information about linear functions. 7. Condense the information about linear functions and create an advertisement, banner, or slogan. 8. Act a short skit that conveys the life of a linear function. 9. Write a poem that conveys the main ideas about linear functions.

65 Free Choice Proposal Form Name:______________________ Teacher’s Approval:___________ Free – Choice Proposal Form Proposal Outline 1.What specific topic or idea will you learn about? 2. What criteria should be used to grade it? 3. What will your final product be? 4. What materials will you need from the teacher to create this product?

66 Free Choice Proposal Form Name:______________________ Teacher’s Approval:___________ Free – Choice Proposal Form for Point-Based Menu Points Requested:_____ Points Approved:_____ Proposal Outline 1.What specific topic or idea will you learn about? 2. What criteria should be used to grade it? 3. What will your final product be? 4. What materials will you need from the teacher to create this product?

67 Novel Think Tac-Toe Directions: Select and complete one activity from each horizontal row to help you and others think about your novel. Remember to make your work thoughtful, original, rich with detail, and accurate. Create a pair of collages that compares you and a character in the book. Compare and contrast physical and personality traits. Label your collages so viewers understand your thinking. Write a bio-poem about yourself and another about a main character in the book so your readers see how you and the character are alike and different. Be sure to include the most important traits in each poem. Write a recipe or set of directions for how you would solve a problem and another for how a main character in the book would solve a problem. Your list should help us know you and the character. Draw/paint and write a greeting card that invites us into the scenery and mood of an important part of the book. Be sure the verse helps us understand what is important in the scene and why. Make a model or a map of a key place in your life, and an important one in the novel. Find a way to help viewers understand both what the places are like and why they are important in your life and the characters’. Make 2 timelines. The first should illustrate and describe a least 6-8 shifts in settings in the book. The second should explain and illustrate how the mood changes with the change in setting. Using books of proverbs and/on quotations, find at least 6-8 that you feel reflect what’s important about the novel’s theme. Find at least 6-8 that do the same for your life. Display them and explain your choices. Interview a key character from the book to find out what lessons he/she thinks we should learn from events in the book. Use a Parade magazine for material. Be sure the interview is thorough. Find several songs you think reflect an important message from the book. Prepare an audio collage. Write an exhibit card that helps your listener understand how you think these songs express the book’s meaning. Novel Title: ____________________Author:_______________________ Activities Selected: _______, _____, _____ Student: ______________________

68 Plagiarism, Copyright Laws, and Documenting Sources 1. Create a collage showing various ways to document sources. 2. Write a report explaining different style manuals and their origins. Give reasons why different subject areas use different styles. 3. Draw a series of cartoons that show different types of plagiarism. Include at least 3 different examples. 4. Contact an Internet provider of student essays or term papers. Ask 5 or more questions in an interview. Present your findings in an oral report to the class. 5. Write a song or rap explaining how, why or what punctuation is used when documenting sources. 6. Create a board game that teaches MLA rules for documenting sources. 7. Write a journal from the point of view of a person who has accused of plagiarism or breaking copyright laws. Include feelings, thoughts and decisions. 8. Debate with a classmate: All music should be completely free to copy and listen to in any format. 9. Make a timeline showing changes in copyright laws.

69 Plagiarism, Copyright Laws, and Documenting Sources Collage: Follows collage criteria card ___ Shows at least 5 ways to document sources ___ Includes examples ___ Possible points = ___ Report: Includes 3 different style manuals ___ Explains origin of each style ___ Accurate information ___ Correct spelling, grammar, etc. ___ Possible points = ___ Cartoon: Follows cartoon criteria card ___ Has 3 or more examples of plagiarism ___ Portrays realistic situations ___ Possible points = ___ interview and Report: Follows oral report criteria card ___ Has 5 or more questions ___ Questions include plagiarism and copyright issues ___ Accurate information ___ Possible points = ___ Song or Rap: Follows song criteria card ___ Accurate information ___ Includes examples ___ Possible points = ___ Board Game: Follows game criteria card ___ Includes 20 or more rules ___ Accurate information ___ Possible points = ___ Journal Entry: Point of view and feelings are clear ___ Thoughts and decisions show knowledge of laws ___ Correct spelling, grammar, etc. ___ Possible points = ___ Debate: Positions on each side are clearly stated ___ Opinions backed up by accurate facts and examples ___ Uses logic and shows evidence of research ___ Possible points = ___ Timeline: Follows timeline criteria card ___ Shows at least 8 events ___ Uses at least 3 resources ___ Possible points = ___

70 Criteria Card (example)

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77 KINDS of LEARNING MENUS  MENU: Main Dishes, Side Dishes, and Desserts (for younger learners).  AGENDA: Imperatives, Negotiables, and Options (for older learners).  List Menus  Menus  Game Show Menus

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79 Entrée (Select One) Draw a picture that shows what happens during photosynthesis. Write two paragraphs about what happens during photosynthesis. Create a rap that explains what happens during photosynthesis. Diner Menu – Photosynthesis Appetizer (Everyone Shares) Write the chemical equation for photosynthesis. Side Dishes (Select at Least Two) Define respiration, in writing. Compare photosynthesis to respiration using a Venn Diagram. Write a journal entry from the point of view of a green plant. With a partner, create and perform a skit that shows the differences between photosynthesis and respiration. Dessert (Optional) Create a test to assess the teacher’s knowledge of photosynthesis.

80 2-5-8 Menu - FICTION Directions: Choose 2 activities from the menu below. The activities must total 10 points. Place a checkmark next to each box to show which activities you will complete. All activities must be completed by ________. 2 points  Complete a story map for a fictional story of your choice.  Create a quiz addressing what important elements a fictional story should contain. 5 points  Make a recipe for a good fictional story.  Read a fictional book of your choice and create a crossword puzzle about the important elements.  Create a poster to show your favorite fictional character. On the poster, place the character in his or her setting, and surround the character with elements from the story.  Free choice – prepare a proposal form and submit it to your teacher for approval. 8 points  Write your own fictional short story about someone your age and a problem he or she must solve.  The Book Hall of Fame is taking nominations for the best fictional book ever written. Write a submission for his honor. Describe the book you picked and why it deserves the honor.

81 Game Show Format – Word Play HomophonesSynonymsAntonymsMultiple Meaning Words Points of Each Level  Complete the homophone brainstorming activity (10)  Make a set of concentration cards for pairs of at least 10 synonyms (10)  Make a window pane of antonyms with at least 10 sets of words (10)  Using a dictionary, look up the word run. Make a poster showing pictures for at least ½ of the definitions for run (15) points  Design a game for your classmates that tests their knowledge of homophones (20)  Create 2 word webs: 1 for good, and one for nice. Brainstorm synonyms for each that could be used in writing instead (20)  Design a worksheet for a student that tests their knowledge of antonyms (20)  Design a crossword puzzle with at least five multiple meaning words (20) points  Create a poem using at least 10 different sets of homophones (30)  Write a funny, descriptive story about a day in the life of a bug. No banned words (30)  Design your own children’s 20- questions book based on antonyms (30)  Create a PowerPoint quiz that uses multiple meaning words and tests the reader’s ability to identify their meaning (30) 30 points  Free Choice (prior approval) (25-50 points)  Free Choice (prior approval) (25-50 points)  Free Choice (prior approval) (25-50 points)  Free Choice (prior approval) (25-50 points) points Total: Total Grade: Banned words: good, bad, fun, like, said, hot, cold, happy, sad, mad, go, blue

82 General – All Purpose Rubric CriteriaExcellent Full Credit Good Half Credit Poor No Credit Self Content: Is the content of the product well chosen? Completeness: Is everything included in the product? Creativity: Is the product original? Correctness: Is all the information included correct? Appropriate Communication: Is the information in the product well communicated?

83 Other types of choices Choice homework for reading assignments; choice note taking; choice bookmarks;

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91 Differentiation – 3 sets of 3 1. On-Going Assessment 2. Flexible Grouping 3. Choices 1.Readiness 2.Interest 3.Learning Profile 1.Content 2.Process 3.Product

92 What is Tiering? The goal of a tiered assignment is to ensure that each student has to stretch a bit to complete the work, but is able to do so with appropriate effort and support.

93 To Tier or Not To Tier? Based on pre-assessments Degree of difficulty of original assignment Does it make sense to have multiple assignments? DON’T REINVENT THE WHEEL!

94 1. Name and define the 6 steps in the experimental design process. 6. Create a data chart for an experiment that has an independent and dependent variable. Graph this data and label the graph properly. 5. Suppose an experimental design process with several trials showed that chickens lay more eggs when listening to music. What additional questions would a scientist ask about this experiment? 2. Design a question that would have an independent and a dependent variable. Label each variable. 3. Change a question into a hypothesis. 4. Change a hypothesis into a prediction statement using IF…, And…, Then...

95 . What are the 6 steps of the experimental design process?. Explain the difference between an independent and dependent variable. 3. Write a hypothesis from this question: Does listening to music cause chickens to lay more eggs?. Using If…, And… Then…, write a prediction statement for the following hypothesis: Listening to music causes chickens to lay more eggs 5. Make a double T chart that would compare an experiment where music is played for one group of chickens and not for another to see if music affects the number of eggs they lay. Label each variable. 6. Make a graph using the following information. Label which axis is the independent and dependent variable. Not playing music—5 chickens lay 17 eggs. Playing music—5 chickens lay 25 eggs. Basic. What are the 6 steps of the experimental design process?. Explain the difference between an independent and dependent variable. 3. Write a hypothesis from this question: Does listening to music cause chickens to lay more eggs?. Using If…, And… Then…, write a prediction statement for the following hypothesis: Listening to music causes chickens to lay more eggs 5. Make a double T chart that would compare an experiment where music is played for one group of chickens and not for another to see if music affects the number of eggs they lay. Label each variable. 6. Make a graph using the following information. Label which axis is the independent and dependent variable. Not playing music—5 chickens lay 17 eggs. Playing music—5 chickens lay 25 eggs. Basic

96 Basic Cube Record Sheet. STEPS WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE? Independent Variable - Dependent Variable -. MUSICAL EGGS Question: Does listening to music cause chickens to lay more eggs? Hypothesis:. PREDICTING EGGS Hypothesis: Listening to music causes chickens to lay more eggs. Prediction: If… And… Then… 5. DOUBLE “T” 6. GRAPH IT

97 Basic Elements Defining the Core Curriculum Process: Thinking Skills ContentProcess: Research Skills Product Thinking SkillSubject MatterResearch Skills and/or Resources Culmination or Exhibition ListThe causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution After reading the text, pages Write a paragraph to share the information.

98 Differentiating the Core: Modifying the Process Element – Thinking Skills Process: Thinking Skills ContentProcess: Research Skills Product Judge with criteria The causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution After reading the text, pages Write a paragraph to share the information. ListThe causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution After reading the text, pages Write a paragraph to share the information.

99 Differentiating the Core: Modifying the Process Element – Research Skills Process: Thinking Skills ContentProcess: Research Skills Product Judge with criteria The causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution Interview an American history professor at the university; use the Internet; and read the text, Chapter IV. Write a paragraph to share the information. ListThe causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution After reading the text, pages Write a paragraph to share the information.

100 Differentiating the Core: Modifying the Product Element Process: Thinking Skills ContentProcess: Research Skills Product Judge with criteria The causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution Interview an American history professor at the university; use the Internet; and read the text, Chapter IV. Write an editorial and debate the positive and negative consequences of the Industrial Revolution. ListThe causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution After reading the text, pages Write a paragraph to share the information.

101 Differentiating the Core: Modifying the Content Element Process: Thinking Skills ContentProcess: Research Skills Product Judge with criteria The patterns in the behaviors and trends of consumers and producers who contributed to the causes and subsequent effects of the Industrial Revolution. Interview an American history professor at the university; use the Internet; and read the text, Chapter IV. Write an editorial and debate the positive and negative consequences of the Industrial Revolution. ListThe causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution After reading the text, pages Write a paragraph to share the information.

102 The “Profiler” Choices: Learning Profile

103 What is your preferred Learning Profile? Write Draw Act Sing Build

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109 Differentiation “Profiler” You have just attended a stimulating workshop on differentiated instruction and you feel motivated to let the world know more about differentiated instruction. Your “world” might be a group of students, parents, fellow teachers, and/or the general public. You will join a group of workshop participants who are as motivated as you are and share your excitement about differentiate instruction to spread the news about this teaching and learning philosophy!

110 Differentiation “Musician” Your mission is to write and perform a song (any style of music) about the experience of observing in a classroom which is focused on developing units and using strategies that help to differentiated instruction. You can make up a new tune or write new lyrics that fit with an existing melody. You should have at least one verse about each of the three sets of three elements that should be the focus of a differentiated classroom. Include a chorus about the goal of differentiated instruction. Make it personal and fun.

111 Differentiation “Writers” Your task is to write an article for USA Today telling the public how differentiated instruction helps teacher to meet the needs of diverse learners in their classrooms. You should minimally include the following information: How students differ as learners. How student learning differences affect how students learn. Evidence you have that explains that students work harder when what they are asked to do connect to something they are interested in doing and/or connects to their learning profile. Identify classroom techniques/strategies that support the achievement of students who have different readiness levels, different interests and/or different learning profiles.

112 Differentiation “Builders” Your group has been commissioned to build a model of a differentiated classroom for a local museum featuring best practices in education. Your model must accurately reflect the elements of differentiated instruction in a classroom where these elements are being practiced. You can build a small model using Play Dough, pipe cleaners, aluminum foil, a flashlight, etc., or you may build a larger model using garbage bags, and anything else you can creatively devise.

113 Differentiation “Actors” Your job is to create and perform an episode of a children's or teenager’s television program. This episode should be all about differentiated instruction. Be sure to include the following information: What is differentiated instruction. What it is like being in a classroom where differentiated instruction is practiced. How you (the student) will benefit from being in a classroom where differentiated instruction is practiced.

114 Differentiation “Artists” Create a poster – or series of posters – that clearly illustrates the key points of what it means to differentiate instruction. Your poster(s) will be designed for those who are unable to read, so it/they must communicate clearly through pictures and graphics, and should not rely heavily on captions. Your posters should depict the three sets of three elements of differentiated instruction. Poster paper, markers and other materials are available; let your instructor know what else you need.

115 Advantages and Disadvantages of a table, graph, report.

116 Where are you on the continuum of DIFFERENTIATION? What will it take for you to move? What roadblocks are in your way? How can you remove them?

117 TTT: Things Take Time One unit at a time One lesson at a time One student at a time One strategy at a time One grade level at a time

118 Where Do I Begin? Start small – but start! First Steps: ****** ****** Next Steps Leaps ****** Bounds Who will help or support you? ___________________ ******

119 Yes but… I teach in a four wall box of drab proportions, But choose to make it a place that feels like home. I see too many students to know them as they need to be known, But refuse to let that render them faceless in my mind. I am overcome with the transmission of a canon I can scarcely recall myself, But will not represent learning as a burden to the young. I suffer from a poverty of time, And so will use what I have to best advantage those I teach. I am an echo of the way school has been since forever, But will not agree to perpetuate the echo another generation. I am told I am as good a teacher as the test scores I generate, But will not allow my students to see themselves as data. I work in isolation, And am all the more determined to connect my students with the world. I am small in the chain of power, But have the power to change young lives. There are many reasons to succumb, And thirty reasons five times a day to succeed. Most decisions about my job are removed from me, Except the ones that matter most. C. Tomlinson

120 Exit Card Name Question: Explain how you would use a strategy (from this presentation) that you could use in YOUR classroom. Rate yourself: 1 = high confidence 2 = medium confidence 3 = I’m not sure on this Would you help someone else learn this? YES Not at this time


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