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Developed by the Center for the Study of Social Policy Funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

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Presentation on theme: "Developed by the Center for the Study of Social Policy Funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation."— Presentation transcript:

1 Developed by the Center for the Study of Social Policy Funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation

2 2 Strengthening Families began by seeking a strategic, feasible approach to child abuse prevention that was: systematic, national, reached large numbers of very young children, and would have impact long before abuse or neglect occurred

3 3 Usual CAN Prevention Strategies Public education campaigns (both targeted and general) Parent education Family support programs/family resource centers Home visiting and other targeted interventions based on risk

4 4 CAN Prevention Successes –Created broad public awareness of the issue –Provided needed information and support to targeted families –Learned about risk factors and how to target families at risk Challenges –Created a sense of defeat/hopelessness –Issues of “at risk” stigma seriously affect program participation and impact –Does not reach enough families early enough

5 5 The hypothesis: early care and education programs could be a good strategy because they offer: Daily contact with parents and children Uniquely intimate relationship with families A universal approach of positive encouragement and education for families An early warning and response system at the first sign of trouble

6 6 A new CAN Prevention Framework Suitable for universal, positive approach to families (no “risk” factors or deficit approach) Connected to what early childhood programs could really do Based on hard evidence

7 7 National Consultation CBFRS Child Trends CWLA Family Support America Free to Grow Natl.Alliance of Children’s Trust Funds NAEYC NCCAN NACCRRA Natl. Child Care Assn Prevent Child Abuse America USA Child Care Zero to Three

8 8 Protective Factors 1.Parental Resilience 2.Social Connections 3.Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development 4.Concrete Support in Times of Need 5.Social and Emotional Competence of Children

9 9 CAN Prevention Protective Factors Social and Emotional Competence of Children Concrete supports in times of need Knowledge of Parenting & Child Development Parental Resilience Program Strategies That: ???? Social Connections Quality Early Care & Education: How Early Childhood programs contribute to prevention of child abuse and neglect

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11 11 CAN Prevention Protective Factors Social and Emotional Competence of Children Concrete supports in times of need Knowledge of Parenting & Child Development Parental Resilience Program Strategies That: Facilitate friendships and mutual support Strengthen parenting Respond to family crises Link families to services and opportunities Value and support parents Facilitate children’s social and emotional development Observe and respond to early warning signs of child abuse or neglect Social Connections Quality Early Care & Education: How Early Childhood programs contribute to prevention of child abuse and neglect

12 12 Tools for Implementation Program guide book and self-assessment tools Literature review Program summaries Analysis of EC infrastructure requirements Newsletters and updates Handouts/slide shows/communication materials Web site:

13 13 Early care and education programs can serve several critical roles for young parents: as a primary source of information and support for young families as a gateway to outside services or supports such as health or mental health services, transportation, and even education, housing and jobs. as the key early warning system when families or children are in trouble.

14 14 What it takes Small but significant changes in program orientation, practice, and attitudes about working with families New partnerships with other service providers, particularly child welfare agencies

15 15 Creating national momentum… National partners –Zero to Three –NAEYC –U of WI –Alliance of Children’s Trust and Prevention Funds CSSP –State pilots What does it take? What would help? –Technical Assistance –Work with funders –Dissemination

16 16 A few persuasive States Alaska Arkansas Illinois Missouri New Hampshire Rhode Island Wisconsin

17 17 State Leadership Teams Child Welfare Early Childhood: Pre K and child care administration and licensing Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems planning (MCH) Early childhood providers of all kinds Advocates for children Children’s Trust Funds and Prevent Child Abuse affiliates Families

18 18 Cross State Issues Professional Development CW/EC linkages Communications Policy and funding changes Evaluation and tracking Learning networks of exemplary programs

19 19 What states can do Define and promote quality standards for early care that include the five protective factors for families. Change licensing requirements to include protective factors Create incentives for programs to adopt new practices

20 20 Partnerships Create real partnerships between early care providers and other agencies that work with children and families – especially the child welfare agency. Change policy and practice to facilitate partnerships. Train all professionals who work with children to promote protective factors

21 21 Alaska Pilot programs with CAN tracking Develop EC/CW links Professional Development Arkansas 3-5 Pilot programs EC/CW links, including cross training Professional Development Media campaign Parent involvement

22 22 Illinois 4 Pilot programs with results tracking EC plan for state wards Professional development in CW and EC CW/EC links Communications plan Parent component Missouri Pilot programs Develop evaluation tools Professional development, including cross training CW and EC workers CW/EC links, including policy and practice changes Funders group Mental health and special needs children links

23 23 New Hampshire 10 pilot programs with evaluation by DYFS and UNH Create model MOAs to create multi agency links Professional development, including higher ed. Rhode Island Community pilot Professional development Indicators and tracking Communications plan Mental Health consultation model Focus on families affected by domestic violence and substance abuse

24 24 Wisconsin EC/CW links and policy changes Pilot programs Professional development for EC providers Research-based Evaluation

25 25 An interesting development … What about the very vulnerable young children already in the child welfare system? EC programs can provide: –Key developmental support –Continuity of care –Support for foster families, kin, and biological families –Early warning and response

26 26 So, in pilot states… CW agencies are looking into: Training for case workers & foster families around child development Changes in assessment and data collection Reimbursements, training and support services (e.g. Mental Health consultants) for centers


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