Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

© 2006 Population Reference Bureau Female Genital Cutting, by Age Prevalence Among Younger and Older Women Percent Source: ORC Macro, Demographic and Health.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "© 2006 Population Reference Bureau Female Genital Cutting, by Age Prevalence Among Younger and Older Women Percent Source: ORC Macro, Demographic and Health."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau Female Genital Cutting, by Age Prevalence Among Younger and Older Women Percent Source: ORC Macro, Demographic and Health Surveys.

2 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau Female Genital Cutting, by Level of Education Prevalence Among Women 15 to 49 Percent Source: ORC Macro, Demographic and Health Surveys.

3 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau Female Genital Cutting, by Residence Prevalence Among Women 15 to 49 Living in Urban, Rural Areas Percent Source: ORC Macro, Demographic and Health Surveys.

4 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau Age at Marriage Median Age at First Marriage, Women 20 to 24 at Time of Survey Years Source: Measure DHS STATcompiler: accessed online at on June 2, 2006.

5 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau Birth Spacing, Less Developed Countries Births, by Interval Percent of all births Source: Measure DHS STATcompiler: accessed online at on June 2, 2006.

6 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau 2000 Maternal deaths per 100,000 Live Births Map of Maternal Mortality, Worldwide Source: WHO, UNICEF, and UNFPA, Maternal Mortality in 2000: Estimates Developed by WHO, UNICEF, and UNFPA, 2004.

7 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau 2000 Estimates Pregnancy and childbirth-related deaths per 100,000 live births Maternal Mortality, by Region Source: WHO, UNICEF, and UNFPA, Maternal Mortality in 2000: Estimates Developed by WHO, UNICEF, and UNFPA, 2004.

8 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau Notes on Maternal Mortality, by Region Over 99 percent of maternal deaths occur in less developed countries, particularly in Asia and Africa. While high-quality, accessible health care has made maternal death a rare event in more developed countries, the lack of such health care has fatal consequences for pregnant women in less developed countries.

9 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau Pregnancy and Childbirth-Related Deaths to Women, by Cause Causes of Maternal Mortality Note: Total exceeds 100 percent due to rounding. Source: World Health Organization, The World Health Report 2005: Making Every Mother and Child Count, Geneva, 2005.

10 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau Over three-quarters of maternal deaths are due to direct complications of pregnancy and childbirth, such as severe bleeding, infection, unsafe abortion, hypertensive disorders (eclampsia), and obstructed labor. Women also die of indirect causes aggravated by pregnancy, such as malaria, diabetes, hepatitis, and anemia. Notes on Causes of Maternal Mortality

11 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau Births in 2004, and Births Attended by Skilled Personnel Births and Assisted Deliveries Worldwide Source: UNICEF End of Decade Databases—Delivery Care (http://childinfo.org/areas/deliverycare).

12 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau The areas of the world in which deliveries are least likely to be attended by skilled personnel, South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, account for nearly half of all births worldwide (37 million and 28 million, respectively, out of a total of 133 million in 2004). Notes on Births and Assisted Deliveries Worldwide

13 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau Skilled Care at Delivery and Maternal Deaths Regional Comparisons, Sub-Saharan Africa South Asia East Asia and the Pacific Middle East and North Africa Latin America and the Caribbean Central, Eastern Europe/ Baltics/ CIS* * Commonwealth of Independent States (former Soviet Union). Source: UNICEF End of Decade Databases—Maternal Health (http://childinfo.org/eddb/maternal.htm).

14 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau Respondents With Symptoms Who Sought Treatment, by Sex Percent Awareness of Sexually Transmitted Infections Note: The figure presents the percentage of respondents reporting symptoms suggestive of STIs in the last 12 months who sought care from a clinic, hospital, or private doctor. Source: DHS HIV/AIDS Survey Indicators Database: accessed online at on June 2, 2006.

15 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau Treatment-seeking for a sexually transmitted infection is a measure of knowledge of infections such as syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia—knowledge of the symptoms and knowledge that they require prompt medical treatment. Symptoms typically appear early in males, whereas STIs are less likely to produce symptoms in women and are therefore more difficult to diagnose until serious problems develop. STIs cause long-term health complications. For example, the association between human papillomavirus and cervical cancer is well established. STIs are one of the most important preventable causes of low birth weight/prematurity, congenital infection, stillbirth, and postpartum infection. Notes on Awareness of Sexually Transmitted Infections

16 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau 2002 New cases per 100,000 women Map of Cervical Cancer Incidence, by Country Source: J. Ferlay et al., International Agency for Research on Cancer, WHO, GLOBOCAN 2002 Database, Note: Rates are age-standardized, meaning they permit international comparison in spite of varying age structures.

17 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau New Cervical Cancer Cases, Annually Cervical Cancer Cases Worldwide Source: J. Ferlay et al., International Agency for Research on Cancer, WHO, GLOBOCAN 2002 Database, 2004.

18 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau Rates per 100,000 women Cervical Cancer, by World Region Note: Rates are age-standardized, meaning they permit international comparison in spite of varying age structures. Source: J. Ferlay et al., International Agency for Research on Cancer, WHO, GLOBOCAN 2002 Database, 2004.

19 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau Rates per 100,000 women Cervical Cancer in the Americas Note: Rates are age-standardized, meaning they permit international comparison in spite of varying age structures. Source: J. Ferlay et al., International Agency for Research on Cancer, WHO, GLOBOCAN 2002 Database, 2004.

20 © 2006 Population Reference Bureau Rates per 100,000 women Cervical Cancer, Latin America/Caribbean Note: Rates are age-standardized, meaning they permit international comparison in spite of varying age structures. Source: J. Ferlay et al., International Agency for Research on Cancer, WHO, GLOBOCAN 2002 Database, 2004.


Download ppt "© 2006 Population Reference Bureau Female Genital Cutting, by Age Prevalence Among Younger and Older Women Percent Source: ORC Macro, Demographic and Health."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google