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Chapter 18 The Person’s Unit Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 18 The Person’s Unit Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 18 The Person’s Unit Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2 The Person’s Unit The person’s unit is the personal space, furniture, and equipment provided for the person by the agency. The person’s unit is the personal space, furniture, and equipment provided for the person by the agency. The person’s unit is a private area. The person’s unit is a private area. Patient and resident rooms are designed to provide comfort, safety, and privacy. Patient and resident rooms are designed to provide comfort, safety, and privacy. OBRA and CMS have requirement for resident’s room that are monitored during surveys OBRA and CMS have requirement for resident’s room that are monitored during surveys Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Slide 2

3 Comfort Temperature and ventilation Most healthy people are comfortable when the temperature is 68  F to 74  F. Older and ill persons may need higher temperatures. Protect infants, older persons, and those who are ill from drafts. Have them wear the correct clothing. Have them wear enough clothing. Offer lap robes to those in chairs and wheelchairs. Provide enough blankets for warmth. Cover them with bath blankets when giving care. Move them from drafty areas. Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Slide 3

4 Odors Odors occur in health care settings and in home care. Odors occur in health care settings and in home care. Perfume in not allowed to be worn by staff Perfume in not allowed to be worn by staff Bowel movements, urine, draining wounds, and vomitus have embarrassing odors-use room deodorizers as needed Bowel movements, urine, draining wounds, and vomitus have embarrassing odors-use room deodorizers as needed Body, breath, and smoking odors may offend others. Body, breath, and smoking odors may offend others. Smoke odors present special problems. Smoke odors present special problems. Residents can only smoke in the areas allowed. Residents can only smoke in the areas allowed. Good nursing care, ventilation, and housekeeping practices help prevent odors. Good nursing care, ventilation, and housekeeping practices help prevent odors. Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Slide 4

5 Noise Common health care sounds may disturb some patients and residents. Common health care sounds may disturb some patients and residents. Loud noises may increase anxiety or frighten some residents Loud noises may increase anxiety or frighten some residents Loud talking and laughter in hallways and at the nurses’ station are common. Loud talking and laughter in hallways and at the nurses’ station are common. To decrease noise: To decrease noise: Control your voice. Control your voice. Handle equipment carefully-watch rolling carts etc Handle equipment carefully-watch rolling carts etc Keep equipment in good working order. Keep equipment in good working order. Answer phones, signal lights, and intercoms promptly. Answer phones, signal lights, and intercoms promptly. Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Slide 5

6 Lighting Good lighting is needed for safety and comfort. Good lighting is needed for safety and comfort. Adjust lighting to meet the person’s changing needs and wishes Adjust lighting to meet the person’s changing needs and wishes Always keep light controls within the person’s reach. Always keep light controls within the person’s reach. This protects the right to personal choice. This protects the right to personal choice. Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Slide 6

7 Room Furniture Rooms are furnished and equipped to meet basic needs. The right to privacy is considered. The patient is encouraged to bring in personal items The room is maintained according to the patient’s wishes The bed must be of proper height and size for the resident Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Slide 7

8 Beds-Side rails are optional. What is the biggest risk? Electric beds Controls are on a side panel, bed rail, or the foot board. Patients and residents are taught to use controls safely. Manual beds have cranks at the foot of the bed. The cranks are up for use and kept down at all other times. Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Slide 8

9 Bed Positions The six basic bed positions are: Flat Fowler’s position degrees High-Fowler’s position degrees Semi-Fowler’s position 30 degrees Trendelenburg’s position HOB is low and feet are high-requires a doctor’s order! Reverse Trendelenburg’s position HOB is high and feet low Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Slide 9

10 Fowlers Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Slide 10

11 Overbed Table The overbed table is moved over the bed by sliding the base under the bed. The overbed table is moved over the bed by sliding the base under the bed. It is raised or lowered for the person in bed or in a chair. It is raised or lowered for the person in bed or in a chair. It is used for meals, writing, reading, and other activities. It is used for meals, writing, reading, and other activities. The nursing team uses the overbed table as a work area-but must be cleaned after The nursing team uses the overbed table as a work area-but must be cleaned after Place only clean and sterile items on the table. Place only clean and sterile items on the table. Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Slide 11

12 Bedside Stand The bedside stand is next to the bed. The bedside stand is next to the bed. It is used to store personal items and personal care equipment. It is used to store personal items and personal care equipment. Place only clean and sterile items on top of it. Place only clean and sterile items on top of it. Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Slide 12

13 Chair and Privacy Curtains The person’s unit has a chair for personal and visitor use. The chair must be comfortable and sturdy. It must not move or tip during transfers. It must not be too low or too soft. The person’s unit has a privacy curtain that extends around the bed. Always pull the curtain completely around the bed before giving care. Privacy curtains only block others from seeing the patient. They do not block sound or voices. Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Slide 13

14 Personal Care Items Personal care items Personal care items Personal care items are used for hygiene and elimination. Personal care items are used for hygiene and elimination. Some persons bring their own personal care products. Some persons bring their own personal care products. The agency provides: The agency provides: Bedpan and urinal Bedpan and urinal Wash basin, emesis basin, water pitcher and cup, and soap and a soap dish Wash basin, emesis basin, water pitcher and cup, and soap and a soap dish Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Slide 14

15 Call Lights The call system lets the person signal for help. The call system lets the person signal for help. When using an intercom system, remember confidentiality. When using an intercom system, remember confidentiality. Persons with limited hand mobility may need a signal light that is turned on by tapping it with a hand or fist. Persons with limited hand mobility may need a signal light that is turned on by tapping it with a hand or fist. You must: You must: Keep the signal light within the person’s reach. Keep the signal light within the person’s reach. Place the signal light on the person’s strong side. Place the signal light on the person’s strong side. Remind the person to signal when help is needed. Remind the person to signal when help is needed. Answer signal lights promptly. Answer signal lights promptly. Answer bathroom and shower or tub room signal lights at once. Answer bathroom and shower or tub room signal lights at once. Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Slide 15

16 Bathrooms Bathroom Bathroom A toilet, sink, call system, and mirror are standard equipment. A toilet, sink, call system, and mirror are standard equipment. Grab bars are by the toilet for safety. Grab bars are by the toilet for safety. Some bathrooms have higher toilets or raised toilet seats. Some bathrooms have higher toilets or raised toilet seats. Bathrooms have signal lights. They are usually next to the toilet. Bathrooms have signal lights. They are usually next to the toilet. The sound of the bathroom call light at the nurses’ station is different from signal lights in rooms. The sound of the bathroom call light at the nurses’ station is different from signal lights in rooms. Someone must respond at once when a person needs help in a bathroom. Someone must respond at once when a person needs help in a bathroom. Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Slide 16

17 Closet and Drawer space Closet and drawer space OBRA and the CMS require that nursing centers provide each person with closet space. The closet space must have shelves and a clothes rack. The person must have free access to the closet and its contents. Items in closets and drawers are the person’s private property. You must have the person’s permission to open or search closets or drawers. Copyright © 2012 by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Slide 17


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