Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Connect, Extend, Challenge: Raising the Bar on Teaching Readers Session 2 Kate Story

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Connect, Extend, Challenge: Raising the Bar on Teaching Readers Session 2 Kate Story"— Presentation transcript:

1 Connect, Extend, Challenge: Raising the Bar on Teaching Readers Session 2 Kate Story

2 Session Overview Session 1 Reflections Connect Extend Challenge Placemat Contemporary Learning Digital Texts Non Fiction Cornerstones Model and Personalised Learning

3 Reflections….

4 Session 1 Revisited… Being Readers- 4 Resources Model Culture of Reading Reading Personalities Teaching Readers within the Cornerstones Model Who are our Students as Readers? Analysing the Essentials: What do Strategic Readers do? Just Right Books and Rich Texts: Text Selection for Older Readers

5 4 Resources Model Decoder What are the letters and words saying? Text User/Meaning Maker What does this mean? Text Participant What do I know about this text? Text Analyst What is the intent of this text? What is the purpose of the author?

6 Reading Personalities Independent, interdependent and self motivated Transfer skills and strategies Accountable Meta-cognitive A Literacy Disposition

7 Culture of Reading.....a place where a group’s collective, as well as individual, reading and writing is valued, visible and actively promoted as a part of the regular day to day experiences of the groups members. (Adapted from Ron Richhart, International Conference of Thinking, Melbourne, 2005)

8 Cultural Forces at Work in a Reading Classroom Cultural ForceHow they are applied:In your classroom… Routines and structuresThat scaffold reading and learningWhat routines and structures for reading and thinking about reading do you have in place in your classroom? Use of languageConversations centered on and about reading What conversations do you have about reading individually or as a group? Expectations communicatedFor reading and learningWhat are your expectations for reading and thinking about reading? Are these communicated? Opportunities createdFor engaging in reading and thinking about reading What opportunities do you provide for reading and thinking/talking about reading in your classroom? Interactions and relationshipsThat show respect for individual reading and thinking about reading How do you interact with your students as readers? How do you develop relationships with them as readers? Physical environmentWhere the process and products of reading and thinking about reading are visible What does your reading classroom look like? How have you made the reading and thinking about reading visible? ModelingOf thinking and talking about readingHow do you model reading and thinking and talking about reading? Do your students perceive you as a reader?

9 Reading Plan What are the Essential Learnings? What teaching is needed? Pedagogy What is the Context for essential learning? Who are your Students? What are the needs, interests and backgrounds of the students - individually and collectively? Who are your students as readers? What explicit reading skills/strategies do students require development in- individually and collectively? What context/ content/text will best provide the opportunities for student learning- individually and collectively? What pedagogy/teaching best compliments the students and their reading learning goals- individually and collectively? Cornerstones Model for Curriculum Planning Story and Sneddon 2007

10 Session 1 Revisited… Being Readers- 4 Resources Model Culture of Reading Reading Personalities Teaching Readers within the Cornerstones Model Who are our Students as Readers? Analysing the Essentials: What do Strategic Readers do? Just Right Books and Rich Texts: Text Selection for Older Readers

11 Connect, Extend, Challenge CONNECT: How are the ideas and information presented CONNECTED to what you already know? EXTEND: What new ideas did you get that EXTENDED or pushed your thinking in new directions? CHALLENGE: What is still CHALLENGING or confusing for you to get your mind around? What questions, wonderings or puzzles do you now have?

12 Connect Extend Challenge Placemat

13 Contemporary Learning?

14 What does Contemporary Learning look like? Supporting the Learner Enabling the Learner Engaging in the Contemporary World Powerful Teaching Powerful Learning

15 Contemporary Literacies that involve… Developing culturally relevant and valued literacy practices Creating and interacting with print, non print and multimodal texts Engaging critically and effectively in a multimodal world Communicating appropriately in a range of social contexts

16 Learning Centred Schools Innovation StreamProfessional Learning Goals Leadership for LearningStrengthen the pedagogic leadership capacities of school leaders. Curriculum By DesignBuild capacities of schools to design and implement a rigorous and relevant curriculum for the 21 st century. Transforming PedagogyPromote contemporary teaching and learning strategies to ensure that students gain the knowledge, skills, understandings and dispositions required to succeed in, and contribute to a modern, globalised world. Assessment for Teaching & Learning Build capacities of schools to measure and improve progress of individuals and cohorts of students. Learning EnvironmentsDevelop contemporary school environments which are safe, flexible, inclusive and foster collaboration and creativity.

17 Connect, Extend, Challenge CONNECT: How are the ideas and information presented CONNECTED to what you already know? EXTEND: What new ideas did you get that EXTENDED or pushed your thinking in new directions? CHALLENGE: What is still CHALLENGING or confusing for you to get your mind around? What questions, wonderings or puzzles do you now have?

18 Digital texts Inanimate Alice Critical Readers and Writers Printed v Digital Texts Author’s Craft Reading as Writers Life is a Beach Non Fiction

19 Episode 4 Sophie & Xiao Yi

20 Handout…  Links to wikis and sites om/

21 Background  School  Teachers  Students  Professional Learning journey- Teacher Professional Leave  Inanimate Alice

22 Givens  Workshop model  Explicit teaching  Culture of literacy and thinking- valued, visible and actively promoted  High expectations for academic rigour  Accountable talk and conversations

23 Bloom’s Taxonomy Planning for Strategic Readers and Writers of Digital Fiction Evaluation- How can they use their knowledge, understandings and connections of narratives, digital fiction and Inanimate Alice to evaluate theirs, and others, episodes? How can they back up and support their evaluations as writers? Synthesis- How can the students use their understandings and connections of narratives, digital fiction and Inanimate Alice to write and create their own episode? Analysis- How can the students further analyse and break down their understandings of printed and digital fiction to get even deeper comprehension and connections? How can they further analyse and break down Inanimate Alice to be able to establish author’s style, intent and craft? Application- How can the students apply what they know and understand about reading and writing printed and digital fiction? How can they make connections and apply their understanding to themselves as readers and writers of digital fiction? Comprehension- What do you want the students to understand about reading and writing digital fiction? Knowledge- What do you want students to know about reading narratives – printed and digital? What do you want students to know about writing narratives – printed and digital?

24 Educative Purpose and Intent The intention of this unit of work:  To apply critical and creative literacy skills to deconstruct digital fiction texts as readers  To analyse and establish author’s craft, purpose and formulas to write and create their own digital text.  To reflect critically on their own role as readers and writers throughout this journey.

25 OUR GOALS:  To model, identify and apply reading strategies (inferring, questioning, wondering) to make sense of both printed and digital texts  To develop critical literacy skills to compare and contrast strategies used when reading and writing printed and digital text types  To identify text structures and features comprehensively and transfer this into their own writing to create episode four.  To identify author’s craft, style and techniques and apply to own writing of digital fiction  To explore the production of multimodal texts  To critically analyse and reflect on themselves as readers and writers of multimodal texts

26 To achieve these, we are asking the students to:  To read printed and digital text  To reflect as readers and compare strategies applied when reading printed and digital texts  To deconstruct digital and printed versions of text  To analyse author’s craft, style, techniques and intent  To identify a formula to follow for creating own text for episode four  To create own episode of digital fiction  To evaluate and reflect on own production of a digital text  To evaluate and reflect on other’s production of digital texts.

27 Read the text Analysed the text as readers Questions and wonderings as readers of the text Watched Episode 1 Compared their reading of print to digital text Analysed their reading of the digital text Identified structure and features of narrative texts Developed criteria/expectations for digital fiction Compared structure and features of printed and digital narrative texts Identified structure, features and author’s style for Inanimate Alice- formula for writing Used formula to create episode 4: written and digital elements Accountability to articulate: their journey as writers of digital fiction the decisions made as writers in the process of creating how their episode aligns with previous episodes.

28 Specific language skills that were developed :  Awareness and use of correct tense  Correct use of a range of punctuation  Sentence structure (simple and complex)  Use of dialogue conventions  Figurative language  Extended vocabulary – consideration of word choice / deliberate word choice  Structure of texts – specifically narrative  Importance of writing for an audience (reading your work as a reader)  Creating images for the reader – through combination of words and visuals  Writing descriptively  Using author techniques  Organisation of text  Relevance vs irrelevance  Revising your work through the lens of a reader not just as a writer

29 Planning and Assessment: Inanimate Alice Unit Planner Assessment Rubric Will’s reflection

30 Margo Edgar: Pascoe Vale Primary School

31 “My words aren’t so boring anymore.” Michael

32 Connect Extend Challenge Placemat

33 Life is a Beach

34 Little Red with a Difference… Q

35 Digital Storytelling with a twist.. Y

36 Connect Extend Challenge Placemat

37 Non Fiction Texts “over 80% of classroom books fell into the fiction category… considering about 80% of what we read outside of school is non fiction, it wasn’t hard to recognise a disconnect.” Stephanie Harvey “Strategies That Work”

38 Non Fiction Texts Non fiction read alouds Non fiction author studies Teaching non fiction forms, text structures and features Explicit teaching of strategies for reading non fiction texts

39 Three-Toed Sloth Text 1

40 Three-Toed Sloth Munro’s Seven High Reliability Strategies GETTING KNOWLEDGE READY VOCABULARY READING ALOUD PARAPHRASING SAY QUESTION THE TEXT ANSWERS SUMMARISING REVIEW

41 Connect Extend Challenge Placemat

42 Non Fiction Reading Power Strategies Zoom In Question/ Infer Determine Importance Connect Transform Adrienne Gear ‘Non Fiction Reading Power’ Stenhouse 2008

43 Zoom-In Active readers recognise, locate and are able to interpret non fiction text features Utilising non fiction text features such as: -maps -charts -diagrams -webs -captions -visuals -italics -bold headings

44 Question/ Infer Active readers ask questions and make inferences to further their understanding on non fiction texts When reading texts that: -Promote deeper thinking -Are designed around questions -Include wordless images -Are open ended in nature and don’t include all of the information

45 3 Types of Questions… Literal Reorganisational Inferential

46 Inferring What is involved? Simple sentences Sections of text What are the clues? What is the conclusion?

47 Simple sentences… Sue blew out the candles and got presents. The boat drifted in the middle of the lake. I forgot to set my alarm clock last night. Everyone stopped when the referee blew the whistle.

48 Sections of text… She enjoyed travelling in the car, but she could never stay still. She was constantly excited by whatever she saw, especially things that moved. We were travelling down a quiet road one lazy Sunday afternoon. Sue, balancing on her four short legs between the headrest of the front seat, spotted a hawk that rose up in front of the car. With a growl, she lunged at it. It took several minutes for her to recover.

49 Sections of text… The under six year old team was playing its first game. Scores of parents spread along the sidelines. His father stood near the halfway line so that he could see all the action. Kurt picked up the ball, put his head down and ran. He saw a white line, dived across it and pressed the ball down. Glowing with pride he stood up. But why were all the spectators laughing? Why was his father right there in front of him grinning?

50 Determine Importance Active readers are able to find the main ideas in non fiction texts In texts : -That may be short (articles, chapters and more text heavy) -Include text features

51 Connect Active readers make connections to experiences and background knowledge to enhance their understanding of non fiction texts -Text to text -Text to Self -Text to World

52 Transform (or Synthesise) Active readers are able to recognise a change in their own thinking, perception, or perspective through reading a piece of non fiction text -Thought provoking issues -Extraordinary events or inspiring people -Quick facts that stimulate big reactions

53 Paraphrasing & Summarising What’s involved as a reader?

54 THIEVESTHIEVES Title Heading/s Introduction Every first sentence Visuals Ending So What?

55 Connect Extend Challenge Placemat

56 Cornerstones Model and Personalised Learning Contemporary Teaching and Learning Critical Literacy Digital Literacy Non Fiction reading strategies

57 Reading Plan What are the Essential Learnings? What teaching is needed? Pedagogy What is the Context for essential learning? Who are your Students? What are the needs, interests and backgrounds of the students - individually and collectively? Who are your students as readers? What explicit reading skills/strategies do students require development in- individually and collectively? What context/ content/text will best provide the opportunities for student learning- individually and collectively? What pedagogy/teaching best compliments the students and their reading learning goals- individually and collectively? Cornerstones Model for Curriculum Planning Story and Sneddon 2007

58 Connect Extend Challenge Placemat

59 &feature=related

60 Where to next?


Download ppt "Connect, Extend, Challenge: Raising the Bar on Teaching Readers Session 2 Kate Story"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google