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Hearing and Hearing Conservation A classroom curriculum for 4 th graders developed by Longwood University Communication Sciences and Disorders for the.

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Presentation on theme: "Hearing and Hearing Conservation A classroom curriculum for 4 th graders developed by Longwood University Communication Sciences and Disorders for the."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Hearing and Hearing Conservation A classroom curriculum for 4 th graders developed by Longwood University Communication Sciences and Disorders for the Farmville Lions. (View “Notes” for information on materials and directions for presentation.) Contact Lissa Power-deFur, Ph.D., CCC-SLP for information about © 2011

3 A partnership between the Lions and Longwood University We Serve The Lions Goal is to serve all people around the world. Our main role is to help people see and hear better and assist those that have an illness called diabetes. We educate people about sight and hearing, provide eye glasses and hearing aids to those in need, and aid people with visual or hearing impairment. © 2011

4 Hearing and Hearing Conservation Listen Up! How to Protect your Hearing! © 2011

5 Hearing Conservation Cycle turn down the volume or get away from the noise get your hearing tested regularly use hearing protection devices that fit well get educated learn about different loud noises Cycle of hearing conservation Preventing damage to your hearing by protecting your ears © 2011

6 What are our senses? Hearing is one of our 5 senses! What are some sounds that we hear every day? © 2011

7 How do we hear? We use our ears to hear different sounds in the environment. © 2011

8 Parts of the Ear Outer Ear © 2011

9 Parts of the Ear Middle Ear The middle ear is made up of the ear drum and three bones called the malleus (hammer), the incus (anvil), and the stapes (stirrup). © 2011

10 Parts of the Ear Inner Ear The inner ear is made up of the cochlea and the auditory nerve. The small hair cells inside the cochlea help us hear the sounds. © 2011

11 The Ear Outer Ear Middle Ear Inner Ear © 2011

12 What is sound? Sound travels in waves, called vibrations. These vibrations hit the different parts of the ear and help us hear all the different sounds! © 2011

13 Sound Sound vibrates at different frequencies. Frequency is how fast a sound wave vibrates through the air. © 2011

14 Frequency of Sound The vibrating frequency can be fast or slow. Fast frequencies make high sounds. Slow frequencies make low sounds. © 2011

15 So How Do We Hear? We hear when sound waves travel through our ear and vibrate the hair cells in our cochlea. How the ear works... © 2011

16 Sounds can be Loud or Soft Sounds are measured in Decibels (dB) Low dB = Quiet sound High dB = Loud sound © 2011

17 Sound Level Meter Measures the dB in the environment Let’s see what different dB readings we can get!! © 2011

18 Sound Level Meter - Quiet © 2011

19 Sound Level Meter – “Shhh” © 2011

20 Sound Level Meter – “Ahhh” © 2011

21 Sounds can be Loud or Soft Sounds start to become harmful when they reach: A dBC dB B dBD dB © 2011

22 Hearing Loss You can get a hearing loss when a part of your ear does not work the way that it needs to for hearing all the sounds in the environment. © 2011

23 Types of Hearing Loss Hearing loss can be: Slight/Mild: have a hard time hearing soft sounds or whispering Moderate: have a hard time hearing someone talking beside you Severe: have a hard time hearing all talking Profound: can only hear the loudest sounds © 2011

24 What noises CAN’T we hear? If you have a mild hearing loss, you couldn’t hear…  Whispers  A fan blowing  A clock ticking If you have a moderate hearing loss, you couldn’t hear…  Normal conversation  A dishwasher  A clothes dryer © 2011

25 What noises CAN’T we hear? If you have a severe hearing loss, you couldn’t hear…  Almost all conversation  Music  A hand drill If you have a profound hearing loss, you couldn’t hear…  A chainsaw  A lawnmower  A siren © 2011

26 How Well Can You Take A Spelling Test When You Have A Hearing Loss This is just for FUN! Listen carefully and spell the words the best you can on your paper. © 2011

27 How Can You Get A Hearing Loss? 1.You can be born with it 2.Illnesses like meningitis or ear infections 3.Being hit in the head or sticking things in your ears 4.Listening to too many loud sounds © 2011

28 You Might Have Hearing Loss if.. You ask people to repeat themselves because you can’t hear them. You can't hear someone who is 3 feet away. People talking near you sound fuzzy. It is hard to hear after you leave a noisy area. You have pain or ringing in your ears after listening to loud noise. © 2011

29 Ear Infections (Otitis Media) What is an ear infection? What does it look like when this happens? © 2011

30 When you had an ear infection, what did the Doctor do? Antibiotics Tubes © 2011

31 Noise Induced Hearing Loss Loud noise can be very damaging to hearing The hair cells in your ears become damaged and if they become damaged they don’t grow back. © 2011

32 What noises are too loud? 150 dB = fireworks at 3 feet 140 dB = guns/gun fire, jet engine 130 dB = jackhammer 120 dB = siren © 2011

33 What noises are too loud? 110 dB = loudest volume on iPods, chain saw 106 dB = gas lawn mower, leaf blower 100 dB = hand drill © 2011

34 What noises are too loud? 90 dB = subway, passing motorcycle 80–90 dB = blow-dryer, kitchen blender, © 2011

35 What sounds are safe? 60 dB = typical conversation, dishwasher, clothes dryer 50 dB = moderate rainfall 40 dB = quiet room 30 dB = whisper, quiet library © 2011

36 How long can we listen to other sounds? 85 dB (kitchen blender): 45 minutes 100 dB (hand drill): 1 minute and 30 seconds 115 dB (siren): 3 seconds 130 dB (jackhammer): less than 1 second 140 dB (guns/gun fire ): NO TIME © 2011

37 Ear Buds Listening to music with ear buds can be harmful to your ears. Ear buds take the sound directly into your ear, causing more damage than regular headphones © 2011

38 What can we do to protect our hearing? Avoid loud noises when possible. Turn down the volume on your iPod. If you know you will be around loud noises, wear hearing protection. © 2011

39 60 for 60 You can listen to your iPod at 60% volume for 60 minutes. 60% for 60 minutes. © 2011

40 Types of Hearing Protection Ear plugsEarmuffs © 2011

41 Wear Earmuffs When Hunting! A gunshot is a very loud sound! Protect your ears by wearing earmuffs to prevent damage to your ears! © 2011

42 Wear Earplugs When at a Concert! Concerts are also VERY loud! Try and stay away from the speakers, and always wear earplugs to protect your hearing! © 2011

43 Tips for Helping your Hearing Remember: E= Ear plugs or ear muffs A= Avoid Loud Sounds R= Reduce Volume S= Shorten time in Noise © 2011

44 Tips For Helping Your Hearing E=A=R=S=E=A=R=S= © 2011

45 Arm’s Length Rule Use the arm’s length rule! If you have to yell to be heard from 3 feet away, the noise is too loud. © 2011

46 Hearing Screenings Get your hearing checked regularly. Ask your parents and ask your doctor. Get your hearing checked if you think you’ve been around a lot of noise! © 2011

47 Sounds can be Loud or Soft Sounds start to become harmful when they reach: A dBC dB B dBD dB © 2011

48 Review Today, we learned about… The parts of the ear Facts about sound How sounds travel What sounds are too loud What sounds are safe How to protect our hearing E-A-R-S © 2011

49 Special Thanks To: Ms. Beth Fitts Mrs. Gloria Eiban Dr. Bill Schall Dr. Lissa Power-deFur Allison Chaplin Andrew Hockenbery The Farmville Lions Club Prince Edward Elementary School Longwood University and the Longwood Center for Communication Literacy and Learning © 2011

50 References American Speech Language Hearing Association. (2011). Communication for a Lifetime. Retrieved from American Speech Language Hearing Association. (2011). Hearing and Balance. Retrieved from American Speech Language Hearing Association. (2010). Listen To Your Buds. Retrieved from Bauman, N.Ph.D. (2007, January 21). What are safe sound levels? Retrieved from Collins, S.H. (1989). Sound hearing or.. Hearing what you miss. Eugene, OR: Garlic Press. Moyer, R., Daniel, L., Hackett, J., Prentice-Baptiste, H., Stryker, P., & Vasquez, J. (2004). Science. (Virginia ed). New York: Macmillian/McGraw- Hill. © 2011

51 Images Retrieved From: Slide 1: Slide 2: Lions Club Logo: 96AE-82E76A9E0763}http://winnebago.govoffice.com/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC={8583B20E-C1B3-46AD-8B72-F35B4C2268F0}&DE={53FA CCD- 96AE-82E76A9E0763 Slide 3: Longwood logo Slide 6: Slide 7: Slide 8 & 9: Slide 10: see slides 7-9 Slide 11: Slide 14: or Slide 21: Slide 25: Slide 28: Diagram: Healthy TM: Infected TM: Slide 29: Slide 30: Slide 31 Gun: Rocket: Slide 32 iPod: Lawn Mower: Slide 33: Motorcycle: Slide 34: Kids talking: © 2011

52 Images Retrieved From Slide 35: Pistol: Ambulance: Hand drill: Blender: Slide 36: Ear Buds: Headphones: Slide 37: Loud Noise Sign: Earplugs: Slide 38: Volume Meter: Slide 39: Earplugs: Earmuffs: Slide 40: Hunter: Earmuffs: Slide 41: Justin Bieber: Earplugs: Slide 42: Lion: Slide 43: Slide 44: Slide 45: Audiometer: Screening: © 2011


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