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Jane Eyre di Franco Zeffirelli (1995) “A black pillar! Such, at least, appeared to me at first sight, the straight, narrow, sable clad shape standing erect.

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Presentation on theme: "Jane Eyre di Franco Zeffirelli (1995) “A black pillar! Such, at least, appeared to me at first sight, the straight, narrow, sable clad shape standing erect."— Presentation transcript:

1 Jane Eyre di Franco Zeffirelli (1995) “A black pillar! Such, at least, appeared to me at first sight, the straight, narrow, sable clad shape standing erect on the rug; the grim face at the top was like a carved mask, placed above the shaft by way of capital”. C. Brontë, Jane Eyre, cit., p.63

2 Jane Eyre di Franco Zeffirelli (1995) “Poverty looks grim to grown people; still more so to children: they have not much idea of industrious, working, respectable poverty; they think of the word only as connected with ragged clothes, scanty food, fireless grates, rudes manners, and debasing vices: poverty for me was synonymous with degradation.” C. Brontë, Jane Eyre, cit., p.56.

3 Jane Eyre di Franco Zeffirelli (1995) “I am very happy, Jane. And when you hear that I am dead, you must be sure and not grieve: there is nothing to grieve about. [… ] By dying young, I shall escape great sufferings. I had not qualities or talents to make my way very well in the world […] I count the hour till that eventful one arrives which shall restore me to Him, reveal Him to me.”

4 Jane Eyre di Franco Zeffirelli (1995) “tall, fair, and shapely […with] a complexion, if pale, clear; and a stately air and carriage” C. Brontë, Jane Eyre, cit., pp

5 Jane Eyre di Franco Zeffirelli (1995) “and her face, naturally pale as marble, appeared to be assuming also the coldness and fixity of that material; especially her mouth, closed as if it would have required a sculptor’s chisel to open it, and her brow settled gradually into petrified severity”. C. Brontë, Jane Eyre, p. 95.

6 Jane Eyre di Franco Zeffirelli (1995) “act as a good girl” C. Brontë, Jane Eyre, p. 102.

7 Jane Eyre di Franco Zeffirelli (1995) From the day she left I was no longer the same: with her was gone every settled feeling, every association that had made Lowood in same degree a home to me. […] It did not seem as if a prop were withdrawn, but rather as if a motive had gone. […] My world had for some years been in Lowood: my experience had been of its rules and systems; now I remembered that the real world was wide, and that a varied field of hopes and fears, of sensations and excitement, awaited those who had courage to go forth into its expanse. C. Brontë, Jane Eyre, p. 116.

8 Jane Eyre di Franco Zeffirelli (1995) “a clergyman, an excellent man, almost worthy of such a wife”. C. Brontë, Jane Eyre, cit., p. 116

9 Jane Eyre di Franco Zeffirelli (1995) “Millions are condemned to a stiller doom than mine, and millions are in silent revolt against their lot. […] Women are supposed to be very calm generally; but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts as much as their brothers do; they suffer from too rigid a restraint, too absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags.”. C. Brontë, Jane Eyre, cit.p. 141.

10 Jane Eyre di Franco Zeffirelli (1995) “The neatest imaginable little elderly lady, in widow’s cap, black silk gown, and snowy muslin apron”. C. Brontë, Jane Eyre, cit., p.127.

11 Jane Eyre di Franco Zeffirelli (1995) “I am so glad, I am so glad you are come; it will be quite pleasant living here now with a companion. To be sure it is pleasant at any time; [... ] yet you know in winter time one feels dreary quite alone, in the best quarters. I say alone - Leah is a nice girl to be sure, and John and his wife are very decent people, but then you see they are only servants, and one can’t converse with them on terms of equality; one must keep them at due distance for fear of losing one’s authority”. C. Brontë, Jane Eyre, cit, p.128.

12 Jane Eyre di Franco Zeffirelli (1995) “Is Mr Rochester an exacting, fastidious sort of man?” “Not particularly so, but he has a gentleman’s tastes and habits, and he expects to have things managed in conformity to them.” “Do you like him? Is he generally liked?” “Oh, yes; the family have always been respected here. Almost all the land in this neighbourhood, as far as you can see, has belonged to the Rochester time out mind.” “Well, but leaving his land out of question, do you like him? Is he liked for himself ?” “I have no cause to do otherwise than like him”, C. Brontë, Jane Eyre, cit., p.136.

13 Jane Eyre di Franco Zeffirelli (1995) “ The din was on the causeway: a horse was coming; the windings of the lane yet hid it, but it approached. […]As this horse approached, and as I watched for it to appear through the dusk, I remembered certain of Bessie’s tales, wherein figured a North of England spirit, called a ‘Gytrash’; which, in the form of horse, mule, or large dog, haunted solitary ways, and sometimes came upon belated travellers, as this horse was now coming upon me.It was now very near, but not yet in sight; when, in addition to the tramp, tramp, I heard a rush under the hedge, and close down by the hazel stems glided a great dog, whose black and white colour made him a distinct object against the trees. It was exactly one mask of Bessie’s Gytrash.[…] The horse followed - a tall steed, and on its back a rider”. C. Brontë, Jane Eyre, cit., pp

14 Jane Eyre di Franco Zeffirelli (1995) “ ‘It is always the way of events in this life,’ he continued presently: ‘no sooner have you got settled in a pleasant resting-place, than a voice calls out to you to rise and move on, for the hour of repose is expired.’‘Must I move on, sir?’ I asked. ‘Must I leave Thornfield?’‘I believe you must, Jane. I am sorry, Janet, but I believe indeed you must.’”. C. Brontë, Jane Eyre, cit., p. 278.


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