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Improving Education for English Learners: Research-Based Approaches English Learner and Support Services Professional Learning Series January 6, 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "Improving Education for English Learners: Research-Based Approaches English Learner and Support Services Professional Learning Series January 6, 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 Improving Education for English Learners: Research-Based Approaches English Learner and Support Services Professional Learning Series January 6, 2011

2 Chapter 4 (pp ) Effective English Literacy Instruction for English Learners by Diane August, Center for Applied Linguistics Timothy Shanahan, University of Illinois, Chicago

3 Title III Accountability Institute August and Shanahan presented at Institute PPT will be posted to the Schools Moving Up website nt/htdocs/smu/webinars/upcoming.htm nt/htdocs/smu/webinars/upcoming.htm

4 Based on a presentation by Jan Mayer, Sacramento COE and Olivia Sosa, San Joaquin COE Title III Regional Leads

5 Today’s format Information on four components of literacy development Your presentations on each of the eight guidelines for teaching literacy to English learners

6 Chapter 4 Overview 6 Primary Source: The National Literacy Panel for Language Minority Children and Youth (August & Shanahan 2006) Chapter is based on the most up-to-date, comprehensive review of the best studies on teaching literacy to ELs. pp

7 7 –Research includes: Literacy learning for language minority children ages 3 – 18 Time span: 1980 – 2002 (National Literacy Panel), (for this chapter) 83 studies included in the review –Dissertations and Technical Reports –Reviews of Instructional Methodology »had to report research (e.g., systematic data analysis) »design was experimental or quasi-experimental »published in peer-reviewed journal p. 210

8 Background of Literacy Development 8 Literacy development requires the acquisition of word-level skills (those involved in word- reading and spelling) text-level skills (those involved in comprehension and writing). p. 211

9 “Ultimately, the goal of literacy instruction is to build students’ comprehension and writing skills.” (p. 211)

10 Background of Literacy Development 10 Although some ELs may progress at slower rates than native speakers, their growth in literacy generally follows s_______ developmental paths. –Word-reading (phonological awareness, decoding) –Spelling (orthographic knowledge) Reading comprehension development of ELs compared to native-speaking peers indicated that the performance of ELs falls w___ b____ that of their native-speaking peers. p. 211

11 Background of Literacy Development 1.Role of First-Language Literacy 1.Role of English-Language Literacy 2.Sociocultural Context 3.Social vs. Academic Language

12 12 Many factors influence cross-language relationships L 1 Literacy experience Similarities of L 1 and L 2 (language and writing systems) Language proficiency Cross-language relationships: Word reading Spelling (positive and negative) Vocabulary (postive and negative [embarrass & embarazar]) Reading comprehension (significant correlation L1 to L2) Reading strategies Writing skills pp Role of First-Language Literacy

13 13 Language minority students receiving instruction in both their native language and English did better on English reading measures than language-minority students instructed only in English. p Role of First-Language Literacy

14 14 …reading programs that used only English to teach ELs to read in English are showing promising results, suggesting that if children receive good instruction with appropriate scaffolding, they can successfully master word-level reading skills in English. p Role of First-Language Literacy

15 15 Phonological processing skills in English were much better predictors of word-reading than was oral language proficiency in either the native language or English. Phonological awareness Rapid letter naming Phonological memory p Role of English-Language Proficiency

16 16 p. 214 …oral English proficiency and the skills that allow accurate and effortless recognition of printed words are essential factors in comprehension development. …oral English proficiency and the skills that allow accurate and effortless recognition of printed words are essential factors in comprehension development. 2. Role of English-Language Proficiency

17 StandUp, HandUp, PairUp 1. What information about the role of first-language literacy did you find reaffirming or interesting? 2. What information about the role of English-language proficiency did you find reaffirming or interesting?

18 3. Sociocultural Context 18 A meta-analysis of studies found bilingual programs were significantly better than English-only programs in developing English literacy skills. (Note: Moderate average effect size) Programs incorporating culturally appropriate curriculum resulted in h_____ levels of e__________. pp

19 4. Social vs Academic Language 19 …we are in accord with Bailey (2007), who stressed the importance of guarding “against believing that there is something inherent in social language that makes it less sophisticated or less cognitively demanding than language used in an academic context.” p. 216

20 4. Social vs Academic Language 20 It is most accurate to characterize the difference between academic language and social language as differences in the relative frequency of complex grammatical structures, specialized vocabulary, and uncommon language functions. Social and academic language may both contain complex linguistic responses. No direct research was found on the notion that “Some ELs have problems developing academic language.” pp

21 Think-Pair-Share Consider the four components of literacy development: role of first-language literacy, role of English-language literacy, sociocultural context, and social vs. academic language. Which one/s currently have the most impact, positively or negatively, on the acquisition of literacy of the ELs in your district/school? How could you address it/them in the future?

22 Review the information about the guideline assigned to your group. On the flip chart, list 2-4 key points. Feel free to add quotes, sketches, etc. Discuss the possible implications of the guideline related to your school/district. Be ready to share with the entire group. The Eight Guidelines for Teaching Literacy to English Learners

23 GuidelinesKey PointsImplications 1.Effective instruction for ELs emphasizes essential components of literacy. pp Effective instruction for ELs is similar to effective instruction for native speakers. pp Effective literacy curriculum and instruction for ELs must be adjusted to meet their needs. pp Effective literacy instruction for ELs is comprehensible and multidimensional. pp

24 24 GuidelinesKey PointsImplications 5.Effective literacy instruction for ELs develops oral proficiency. pp Effective literacy instruction for ELs is differentiated. pp Effective literacy instruction for ELs requires well-prepared teachers. pp Effective literacy instruction for ELs is respectful of the home language. pp

25 …we hope the guidelines will be useful to practitioners as they grapple with the everyday challenge of educating English learners, to policymakers as they endeavor to create contexts in which effective instruction can occur, and to researchers attempting to build on previous research. Conclusion p. 237


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