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4th March 2002 Concluding Report Pragmatic Solutions to improve rail-freight transport along the North-South Corridor This report is confidential and only.

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Presentation on theme: "4th March 2002 Concluding Report Pragmatic Solutions to improve rail-freight transport along the North-South Corridor This report is confidential and only."— Presentation transcript:

1 4th March 2002 Concluding Report Pragmatic Solutions to improve rail-freight transport along the North-South Corridor This report is confidential and only intended for client‘s use

2 1RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt On the basis of the results of the initial hearing and interviews, the problems and their causes in the freight corridor were analysed and possible solutions identified... Procedure … the most important conclusions are presented here Interim ReportSelected interviews with market participants 1. Hearing in CH und NL with market participants Review though 2nd hearing (CH und NL) and coordination with D and I Overview problem areas Understanding causes Proposed solutions Revised final report on improving the north-south freight corridor Revised final report on improving the north-south freight corridor January 2002December January 2002 October 2001February 2002March 2002

3 2RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt “too costly” “too late” “too little”  Disproportiantely high price  Pricing structure too complex Today‘s rail-freight transport problems can be summarised into three areas Problem areas of rail-freight transport on the north-south axis Cost and cost structure 2 2 Quality 1) 1 1 Capacity 2) 3 3 1) Quality also includes short-term capacity shortfalls, which lead to poor quality 2) Includes the mediam to,long-term capacity shortfalls  Long-term capacity shortfall in long distance network, local feeder networks and at terminals  Delays  Long transport times  Lack of Track & Trace, inadequate client information  Response times Weighting Highest priority Lowest priority 0 4 Problem area Characteris tics

4 3RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt It was possible to identify 7 main causes on the basis of the causal analysis of the three problem areas Cause )  Lack of locomotives Details  Planning  Access restrictions  Condition of locomotives  Planning  Access restrictions  Condition of locomotives  Lack of drivers  Planning  Access restrictions  Planning  Access restrictions  Customs procedure (esp. for private train operators)  Complexity and time needed for customs checks for cross- border freight transport  Inadequate international coor- dination and flow of information  Coordination on introduction of timetables  Coordination and flow of information in daily planning  Coordination on introduction of timetables  Coordination and flow of information in daily planning  Prioritisation of shipments in case of delay and unforeseen events  Capacity shortfall in infrastructure  Differing pricing methods ) Not according to importance  Freight transport vs. Passenger transport  Between various types of freight transport  Freight transport vs. Passenger transport  Between various types of freight transport  Bottle-neck on north-south corridor  Bottle-necks at terminals  Bottle-neck on north-south corridor  Bottle-necks at terminals  Variability and transparency of route prices  Variability and transparency of train prices  Variability and transparency of route prices  Variability and transparency of train prices

5 4RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt The causes identified relate to the fact that the north-south corridor currently consists of nationally managed transport and networks Interface problems and maximisation of market forces Operator Level (Rail Operator, RO) Infrastructure level ROs, e.g. Railion, Shortlines, ACTS ROs, e.g. Railion, Shortlines, ACTS Infrastructure Manager Infrastructure Manager Holland DB Germany SBB Switzerland FS Italy HGK, etc. FNM, etc. BLS, etc.

6 5RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt The causes identified could be addressed by an integrated corri- dor concept for the north-south axis Operator (Transport) level Infra- structure level ROs NLDCHI Short to medium termMedium to long term RO 1 RO 2 RO 3 NLDCHI Infrastructure remains in national hands, only the management of the infra- structure will be internationally integrated ROs Corridor Control Centre

7 6RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt This would require significant changes to current practices... Measures to realise the integrated north-south corridor  1. Dedicated Corridor Control Centre  2. „One stop shop“ for clients using corridor  3. Transparency in corridor pricing  4. Integrated timetable planning (cross-border)  5. Greater flexibility of prioritisation of transports, particularly in case of delays  1. Dedicated Corridor Control Centre  2. „One stop shop“ for clients using corridor  3. Transparency in corridor pricing  4. Integrated timetable planning (cross-border)  5. Greater flexibility of prioritisation of transports, particularly in case of delays Integrated infrastructure management  6. Corridor-specific locomotive pool  7. Cross-border use of locomotives and drivers  8. Better coordination and information flows in daily planning and disposition of ROs  6. Corridor-specific locomotive pool  7. Cross-border use of locomotives and drivers  8. Better coordination and information flows in daily planning and disposition of ROs Improved operation (transport)  9. Analysis and planning of on north-south corridor  10. Elimination of bottle-necks and optimisation of capacity of north-south corridor  9. Analysis and planning of on north-south corridor  10. Elimination of bottle-necks and optimisation of capacity of north-south corridor Capacity improvements  11. Extension of simplified customs procedures for all rail operators  12. Mutual recognition of training and licensing of train drivers  13. Mutual recognition of locomotive licensing  14. Market observation to prevent distortion of competition  11. Extension of simplified customs procedures for all rail operators  12. Mutual recognition of training and licensing of train drivers  13. Mutual recognition of locomotive licensing  14. Market observation to prevent distortion of competition Harmonised basic conditions … the necessary measures are listed as follows... Measures partly already initiated by market participants

8 7RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt A joint Corridor Control Centre would enable an integrated management of corridor infrastructure in the medium to long-term and thereby improved coordination and information flows Operation Infra- structure NLDCHI Corridor Control Centre …  The Corridor Control Centre consists of infrastructure managers from 4 countries, who jointly supervise the corridor infrastructure from one location  As an operations control centre information flow and integrated operations management can therefore be assured  It must be supported by open IT systems in order to enable the rail operators to monitor their trains  The Control Centre should also have Account Managers for important rail operators so as to provide a contact interface(Single-Point-of-Contact)  Furthermore, the ITCs and if necessary important clients should also be able to take a seat in the Control Centre Measure 1: Corridor Control Centre (short to medium-term) RO 1 RO 2 RO 3 RO 4 RO 5

9 8RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt In addition a Corridor Infrastructure Sales Office could be set up as a One-stop-shop for Clients  The future model of the One-Stop-Shop could be an infrastructure sales office for the track network management  This office should be operated by the various corridor infrastructure managers  The roll would consist of timetable planning, track management and price setting of infrastructure for national rail companies and Open Access Operators  The One-Stop-Shop should also contribute to transparency of corridor pricing and bring about a harmonisation of price setting methods Measure 2+3:„One-stop-shop“ and price transparency RO 1 RO 2 RO 3 Infrastructure Manager 1 Infrastructure Manager 2 Infrastructure Manager 3 Infrastructure Manager 4 Client Own client of Open Access Operator (e.g. IKEA) Open Access Logistics Company Corridor Infrastructure Operations Office

10 9RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt The joint planning of timetables and resources should continue to be improved in order to raise the quality of rail-freight transport  It is important that national timetables for rail-freight are altered on the same date each year so as to prevent disruption  Open IT planning systems could contribute to improved coordination of the timetable planning in rail-freight transport –Such systems would enable advance insight into the creation of international timetables –They could also be useful to test the availability of locomotives, drivers and track/network capacity beyond one‘s own border Measure 4: Integrated timetable planning (cross-border)

11 10RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt The prioritisation rules used by the Corridor Control Centre should be well-considered and take into account the volume of various transports  Basically the prioritisation rules should be reconsidered and moreover with regard to –Passenger transport and freight transport as well as –Between various types of freight transport (e.g. UCT versus Truck on Train  The „Value“ concept could be used as a priority determinant –One stretch of track could contribute to the transportation of 1.5 million tonnes of international freight per year –The same stretch of track could also be used to carry just 100 local passengers a day –A decision-support system could be used to weigh up different types of transport and determine corresponding priorities  The reconsideration or flexiblee approach to priority rules is important particularly in case of delays, in order to raise the quality of rail-freight transport Measure 5: Greater flexibility in prioritising shipments

12 11RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt Furthermore, dedicated locomotives for the north- south corridor would improve the quality of cross-border rail- freight transport  Dedicated locomotives for freight transport could be used to bring about an optimal service in the corridor. Ideal characteristics include: –Medium to high hauling power –Medium speed, so that it can keep up with quicker passenger trains and also maximise track capacity –Multi-current locomotives enabling cross-border operation in various electricity systems –Equipped for various signal systems (the standardisation in Europe will render this requirement superfluous in future) –Diesel locomotives could be used where conditions permit (e.g. less incline)  Dedication would also prevent the locomotives being used for other transports and mean they were ready when needed  The railway companies could either dedicate their own locomotives for the corridor or set up a transport company with a locomotive pool for the corridor to lease locomotives to ROs in the corridor Measure 6: Corridor-specific locomotive pool

13 12RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt Cross-border use of multi-current or diesel locomotives would reduce the number of locomotive changes at critical points in the network Border Terminal Gate = Locomotive change Present Future Electric Diesel/Multi-current Electric Diesel Advantage:  Fewer Locomotive changes  Avoids locomotive changes at critical points Advantage:  Fewer Locomotive changes  Avoids locomotive changes at critical points Measure 7: Cross-border use of locomotives and drivers I (3kV) CH (15kV) D (15kV) D (15kV) NL (1.5kV) Example Optimisation of overall stretch Neither locomotives nor drivers should be changed at the border, but rather at points for optimal efficiency.

14 13RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt Through better coordination and communication between ROs on the corridor in daily planning and disposition, the quality of freight transport can be raised  Joint planning and disposition of freight transport companies can be improved through transport concepts such as overlapping transport planning and controls (e.g. SBB/Trenitalia Feeder/Long Haul) and by extraction of specific corridors –Since the introduction of the feeder/long haul project, SBB/Trenitalia have been able to make significant improvements and plan to extend the concept  In addition, the EVUs should be informed more quickly of delays through daily planning and priority setting of shipments better coordinated  By having a seat in the Corridor Control Centre, the communication of information between ROs will be simplified Measure 8: Better coordination and information in daily planning and disposition of ROs

15 14RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt A corridor capacity plan could be a basis for a capacity improvement along the north-south axis Development and adoption of capacity development plan with measures and cost estimates  Capacity increase of exisitng terminals  Planning of new terminals  Use of closed facilities  Capacity increase of exisitng terminals  Planning of new terminals  Use of closed facilities  Study feasibility of track widening  Examine alternative routes, so as to avoid over loading certain stretches  Identify other measures to increase capacity  Examine alternative routes, so as to avoid over loading certain stretches  Identify other measures to increase capacity Identification of possible solutions (Return to national plans and information from 1st hearing where available) Identification of possible solutions (Return to national plans and information from 1st hearing where available) Terminal capacity Single-track stretches Single-track stretches Overstretched network hubs Overstretched network hubs Identification of existing bottle-necks Measure 9: Capacity plan

16 15RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt Capacity improvement must – based on the capacity plan – be tackled on 3 levels S. EuropeN. Europe Local feeder/terminal Bottle-necks– Possibility of using disused or not fully used routes and terminals/sidings Local bottle-necks in long-distance network– bottlenecks can sometimes be lifted with short-term measures, e.g. Signal changes to increase capacity Strategic/Long-term Pre-defined projects (e.g. NRLA) requiring large investments and long implementation periods Strategic/Long-term Pre-defined projects (e.g. NRLA) requiring large investments and long implementation periods Measure 10: Removal of bottle-necks and optimisation of capacity on north-south corridor

17 16RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt The harmonisation of basic conditions is required to create and integrated north-south corridor Measures 11-14: Harmonisation of basic conditions Simplified customs procedures  Without „simplified customs procedures“ cross-border freight transport is rendered highly difficult  The „simplified customs procedures “ should be extended to all rail operators –Private rail operators –National rail companies, operating abroad under Open Access  Consequently, the outsourcing of the accounting point into an independent service company capable of taking over the billing of rail operators should be assessed  Without „simplified customs procedures“ cross-border freight transport is rendered highly difficult  The „simplified customs procedures “ should be extended to all rail operators –Private rail operators –National rail companies, operating abroad under Open Access  Consequently, the outsourcing of the accounting point into an independent service company capable of taking over the billing of rail operators should be assessed Training and licensing of drivers and locomotives  Variation in individual countries of rules regarding training and licensing of train drivers and differences in approval of locomotives restrict the cross-border use of resources  The mutual recognition of training and licensing rules would enable more efficient operations on the north-south corridor  Variation in individual countries of rules regarding training and licensing of train drivers and differences in approval of locomotives restrict the cross-border use of resources  The mutual recognition of training and licensing rules would enable more efficient operations on the north-south corridor Market observation  Coordinated market observation to avoid distortions to competition

18 17RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt The implemenation of the concept of an integrated north-south corridor has significant advantages for all market participants Improved quality Reduced costs for carriage owners Reduced rail operating costs Better real time service information Reduced circulation time Improved punctuality Higher volume Higher product-profitability Higher volume Higher product-profitability Advantages for rail companies Reduced prices Reduced, internal transport costs Better planning of arrival times Reduced prices Reduced, internal transport costs Better planning of arrival times Advantages for clients Higher attractivity Lower “crisis management” costs Expected effects

19 18RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt The realisation of the corridor concept requires the implementation of numerous short, medium and long-term measures Masterplan Integrated infrastructure management Integrated infrastructure management Improved Operation Improved Operation Capacity improvements Capacity improvements Harmonised basic conditions Harmonised basic conditions Short-term ( )Medium-term ( )Long-term ( )  Creation of Corridor Control Centre  Improvement of planning integration for freight transport  Revision of priority setting rules  Creation of price transparency  Creation of Corridor Control Centre  Improvement of planning integration for freight transport  Revision of priority setting rules  Creation of price transparency  Creation of corridor infrastructure, coordination and sales office as “One-stop-shop”  Development of more open IT sys- tems (e.g. Train Position Tracking) for all corridor users  Creation of corridor infrastructure, coordination and sales office as “One-stop-shop”  Development of more open IT sys- tems (e.g. Train Position Tracking) for all corridor users  Corridor specific locomotive pool  Acquisition of multi-current loco- motives  Improvement of coordination and information flows in daily freight transport planning  Corridor specific locomotive pool  Acquisition of multi-current loco- motives  Improvement of coordination and information flows in daily freight transport planning  Cross-border use of locomotives and drivers  Drafting of capacity plan for north- south corridor  Capacity improvement: Lifting of bottle-necks (e.g. Terminals, local feeder networks etc)  Extension of main network according to needs  Extension of simplified customs procedure to all rail operators  Coordinated market observation to prvent distortion of competition  Extension of simplified customs procedure to all rail operators  Coordinated market observation to prvent distortion of competition  Outsourcing of accounting point for simplified customs procedure  Mutual recognition of training and licensing of locomotives and drivers  Outsourcing of accounting point for simplified customs procedure  Mutual recognition of training and licensing of locomotives and drivers Implemenation periods

20 19RPMU_849_MM01_10.ppt Clearly defined areas of responsibility were set for each field of tasks Responsibilities Integrated infrastructure management Integrated infrastructure management Improved operation Improved operation Capacity improvements Capacity improvements Harmonised basic conditions Harmonised basic conditions  Infrastructure Managers in the individual countries  State –Forcing and support with international cooperation –Common revision of rules on prioritisation with infrastructure managers –Promotion of a priority pilot project within the exisiting working group on North-South freight freeway  ROs: Cooperation on Corridor Control Centre  State –Forcing and support with international cooperation –Common revision of rules on prioritisation with infrastructure managers –Promotion of a priority pilot project within the exisiting working group on North-South freight freeway  ROs: Cooperation on Corridor Control Centre  ROs of the North-South Corridor  State –Enabling of cross-border use of train drivers and locomotives through mutual recognition  Transport companies and terminal operators –Close cooperation with ROs in improvement measures  State –Enabling of cross-border use of train drivers and locomotives through mutual recognition  Transport companies and terminal operators –Close cooperation with ROs in improvement measures  State with strong participation of infrastructure managers and terminal operators –Initiator –Financing –Implementation  State with strong participation of infrastructure managers and terminal operators –Initiator –Financing –Implementation  Infrastructure manager, ROs, terminal operators and transport companies –Joint compilation of capacity plan for the corridor –Upgrading of infrastructure according to requirements  Infrastructure manager, ROs, terminal operators and transport companies –Joint compilation of capacity plan for the corridor –Upgrading of infrastructure according to requirements  State  ROs and transport companies –Specialist support, elaboration of proposals –Assessment of outsourcing of costing point for the simplified customs procedure into an independent service company  ROs and transport companies –Specialist support, elaboration of proposals –Assessment of outsourcing of costing point for the simplified customs procedure into an independent service company Person/Agency responsible Participant/Support


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