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Welcome! CCSS App for Smart Phone As you enter, if you have a smart phone and do not have this free app for the Common Core State Standards, you may wish.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome! CCSS App for Smart Phone As you enter, if you have a smart phone and do not have this free app for the Common Core State Standards, you may wish."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome! CCSS App for Smart Phone As you enter, if you have a smart phone and do not have this free app for the Common Core State Standards, you may wish to download it to use both today and in the future. 1

2 An instructional framework guiding teachers to make certain decisions which support alignment with instructional shifts and demands of the Common Core. - Lee Kappes ESD - Seattle, Washington Introduction to LDC June 23-24, 2014 Day 1 2

3 Overview of the Sessions 3

4 Outcomes Deepen an understanding of the instructional shifts, structure and demands of the Common Core State Standards Learn about using the LDC framework to design instruction to meet the expectations of the Common Core Use an LDC Template Task to create a Teaching Task to target grade level Common Core aligned skills and instruction Gain a deeper understanding of the role of text complexity Plan aligned/coherent mini tasks that provide formative teaching and learning opportunities Share high-leverage instructional strategies Discover supports for implementing LDC 4

5 Norms What working agreements will help make today be successful for you? 5

6 Instructional Shifts Required by the Common Core  Increasing rigor and relevance  Sharing responsibility of teaching reading and writing across content areas  Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction and informational text  Reading, writing, speaking and listening grounded in evidence from texts  Practicing regularly with complex text and its academic vocabulary  Emphasizing 3 modes of academic writing  Addressing grade level literacy outcomes 6

7 Structure of the Standards Strand Anchor Standard Grade-Specific Standard 7

8 4 Strands Reading Literature - RL Informational - RI Foundations - RF Writing - W Speaking and Listening - SL Language - L 8

9 Getting to Know the Anchor Standards 9

10 CCSS Build Upon One Another 10

11 Deconstructing a Standard –Reading Standard for Informational Text 1 Anchor Standard: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. Grade and Standard K - With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. 1 st - Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. 2 nd - Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. Change in Expectations Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. (no prompting) Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. 11

12 Grade and Standard 2 nd - Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. 3 rd - Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 4 th - Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 5 th - Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Change in Expectation Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 12

13 Grade and Standard 5 th - Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 6 th - Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 7 th - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 8 th - Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Change in Expectation Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 13

14 Grade and Standard 8 th - Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 9 th and 10 th - Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 11 th and 12 th - Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. Change in Expectation Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. 14

15 Identify Specific Grade Level Demands In small groups, highlight the changes in expectations in Writing Standard 1. 15

16 Writing Standard 1 Anchor Standard: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. 16

17 K - Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose opinion pieces in which they tell a reader the topic or the name of the book they are writing about and state an opinion or preference about the topic or book (e.g., My favorite book is...). 1 st - Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure. 2 nd - Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking words (e.g., because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement or section. 17

18 3 rd - Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons. a. Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons. b. Provide reasons that support the opinion. c. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, therefore, since, for example) to connect opinion and reasons. d. Provide a concluding statement or section. 18

19 4 th - Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. a. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer’s purpose. b. Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details. c. Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to, in addition). d. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented. 19

20 5 th - Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. a. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s purpose. b. Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details. c. Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically). d. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented. 20

21 6 th - Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. a. Introduce claim(s) and organize the reasons and evidence clearly. b. Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text. c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the relationships among claim(s) and reasons. d. Establish and maintain a formal style. e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the argument presented. 21

22 7 th - Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. a. Introduce claim(s), acknowledge alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically. b. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text. c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), reasons, and evidence. d. Establish and maintain a formal style. e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. 22

23 8 th - Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. a. Introduce claim(s), acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically. b. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text. c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. d. Establish and maintain a formal style. e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. 23

24 9 th -10 th - Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns. c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. 24

25 11 th -12 th - Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. a. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases. c. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. 25

26 What Are the Implications? What Did You Notice? 26

27 Overview of the LDC Framework 27

28 A Look at LDC in the Classroom Literacy Matters http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O5EnOVjRPGIhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O5EnOVjRPGI What do you notice that the teacher is saying and doing? What do you notice that the students are saying and doing? 28

29 Why the emphasis on tasks? “What was different in the four classrooms was what students were actually being asked to do, and the degree to which the teacher was able to engage students in the work by scaffolding their learning up to the complexity of the task she was asking them to do.” – Richard Elmore Rounds in Education. lizabeth A. City, Richard F. Elmore, Sarah E. Fiarman, and Lee Teitel What Task? - What Task? - Section 1 The Core of the LDC Framework 29

30 Creating Rich Teaching Tasks “… the basic components of a writing assignment or prompt are: (a) the topic, (b) the audience, and the rhetorical structure or genre to be produced.” “A poorly designed writing prompt can result in student writing that does not meet the intended requirements of the teacher.” “The Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC) proposes that good writing prompts can be formulated using prefabricated task templates that allow the teacher to customize.” Close Reading and Writing From Sources by Douglas Fisher and Nancy Frey 2014 30

31 The Template Tasks and the CCSS Task 2 Template (Argumentation/Analysis): [Insert optional question] After reading ________ (literature or informational texts), write a/an ________ (essay or substitute) in which you address the question and argue_______(content) Support your position with evidence from the text(s). Task 14 Template: (Informational/Description): [Insert optional question] After reading ________ (literature or informational texts), write a/an ________ (essay, report, or substitute) in which you describe ________ (content). Support your discussion with evidence from the text(s). 31

32 Template Task Collection The “Template Task Collection” is organized by… Writing Type: Argumentation, Informational/Explanatory, Narrative Text Structure: Definition, Description, Analysis, Problem- Solution, etc. Task Types: “After researching...” or “Insert Essential Question” Essential Question is optional in new template drafts 32

33 Demands Demands are additional writing and cognitive challenges that you can add to a template task. Demands are developed from language in the CCSS. Demands can scaffold your instruction. 33

34 Demands You may choose one or more of these demands (D) to increase the challenge: D1 Be sure to acknowledge competing views. D2 Give ____(one; #) example/s from past or current ____ (events; issues) to illustrate and clarify your position. D3 What _____(conclusions; implications) can you draw ____? D4 In your discussion, address the credibility and origin of sources in view of your research topic. D5 Identify any gaps or unanswered questions. D6 Use ________ (stylistic devices) to develop your work. D7 Use ________ (techniques) to convey multiple storylines. D8 Include ________ (e.g. bibliography, citations, references, endnotes). 34

35 Elementary Template Tasks BETA Released in May 2014 Grade Bands: K-1 2-3 4-5 Rubrics to follow Sample Teaching Tasks to follow 35

36 Original Task 2 Template (Argumentation/Analysis): [Insert question] After Reading ________ (literature or informational texts), write a/an ________ (essay or substitute) that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the text(s). L2 Be sure to acknowledge competing views. L3 Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position. Teaching Task 2 (High School): Were the achievements and growth of the Industrial Revolution Era worth the cost to society? After reading secondary and primary sources pertaining to the British Industrial Revolution, write an argumentation essay that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the texts. Be sure to acknowledge competing views. LDC Template Task  Teaching Task Teachers fill–in-the-blank by choosing: text - writing product - content - text structure 36

37 Original Elementary Task 1 Template: [Insert question] After reading_______ (literary or informational text/s), write a/n_____ (product) in which you answer the question and explain your reasons_____ (content). Give ________ (an, several, or #) examples from ____(text/s) to support your opinion. (Argumentation/Explain) Elementary Task 1 Science Example: Is pizza a nutritious food product? After reading the two provided articles, write a report in which you answer the question and explain your reasons from a health and science point of view. Give an example from the articles to support your opinion. LDC Template Task  Teaching Task Teachers fill–in-the-blank by choosing: targeted content standard - text - writing product - content - text structure 37

38 Original Elementary Task 8 Template: [Insert optional question] After reading _____(literary or informational text/s), write a/n_____ (product) in which you compare______(content). Give ____ (an, several, or #) example/s from ____(text/s) to support your discussion. (Informational or Explanatory/Compare) Elementary Task 8 ELA Example: After reading William Blake’s poem, “I was angry with my friend,” and the lyrics to Happy Ending by Avril Lavigne, write an essay in which you compare themes in each work. Give two examples from each work to support your discussion. LDC Template Task  Teaching Task Teachers fill–in-the-blank by choosing: targeted content standard - text - writing product - content - text structure 38

39 Strong Teaching Tasks: Strong Teaching Tasks are:  Are worthy of 2, 3 or 4 weeks of instruction  Ask students to grapple with important content to the discipline  Target grade specific Common Core literacy standards and content GLEs  Evolve from a rigorous text-dependent question directly related to the content or standard(s)being taught  Provide opportunities to read informational text of appropriate text complexity and content specific to the grade level  Have students working in the most effective mode of discourse/text structure to demonstrate understanding and new knowledge  Involve products written for an authentic audiences  Stay true to the wording of the template task Important Note: When looked at cumulatively, strong teaching tasks engage students in a balanced set of rich writing tasks over the course of the year. 39

40 Discipline Specific Grade 7 ELA Task Template 2 — Argumentation & Analysis When, if ever, is it morally responsible to disobey authority? After reading primary and secondary document sources write a speech to the mayor and local officials that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the texts. RI7.8 Which author articulates the most convincing claim as to when it is morally responsible to disobey authority? After reading primary and secondary document sources, write an essay to display at our upcoming literary sharing session that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the texts. 40

41 Strong Teaching Tasks: Strong Teaching Tasks are:  Are worthy of 2, 3 or 4 weeks of instruction  Ask students to grapple with important content to the discipline  Target grade specific Common Core literacy standards and content GLEs  Evolve from a rigorous text-dependent question directly related to the content or standard(s)being taught  Provide opportunities to read informational text of appropriate text complexity and content specific to the grade level  Have students working in the most effective mode of discourse/text structure to demonstrate understanding and new knowledge  Involve products written for an authentic audiences  Stay true to the wording of the template task Important Note: When looked at cumulatively, strong teaching tasks engage students in a balanced set of rich writing tasks over the course of the year. 41

42 Jurying Teaching Tasks 42

43 Write a Task - Sample Step 1: What is the topic and/or text that will be addressed in this module? The British Industrial Revolution 43

44 Write a Task - Sample Step 2: What reading standard (in addition to #1 and 10) will be targeted/taught through this module? RH9-10.9 Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources. 44

45 Write a Task - Sample Step 3: What GLE(s) will be targeted/taught through this module? Students will analyze the factors and conditions needed to industrialize and to expand industrial production as well as shifts in economic practices. Students will examine changes and innovations in energy, technology, communication, and transportation that enabled industrialization. Students will investigate the social, political, and economic impacts of industrialization… 45

46 Write a Task - Sample Step 4: What writing standard(s) will be targeted/taught through this module? WHST9-10.1 Write arguments focused on discipline-specific Content… and WHST9-10.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. 46

47 Write a Task - Sample Step 5: What do you want students to learn while studying this topic (enduring understandings)? Students should understand that there benefits of the British Industrial Revolution, but also that there were costs. 47

48 Write a Task - Sample Step 6: Considering your topic, ask yourself what text structure would be most conducive to a successful student response (i.e. compare/contrast, define, describe, cause/effect, etc.)? Original Task 2 Template (Argumentation/Analysis): [Insert question] After reading ________ (literature or informational texts), write a/an ________ (essay or substitute) that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the text(s). L2 Be sure to acknowledge competing views. L3 Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position. 48

49 Write a Task - Sample Step 7: Decide if you will begin the teaching task with a question. Decide which (if any) demands to include in the teaching task. Were the achievements and growth of the Industrial Revolution Era worth the cost to society? After reading secondary and primary sources pertaining to the British Industrial Revolution, write an argumentation essay that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the texts. Be sure to acknowledge competing views. 49

50 Lunch 50

51 Welcome back! 51 If you have a smart phone and do not have this free app for the Common Core State Standards, you may wish to download it to use both today and in the future. What are two ‘take-aways’ from this morning? Jot yourself a note and share out with your table partners. Be ready for a whip-share with the group.

52 Your Turn to Write a Task Step 1: What is the topic and/or text that will be addressed in this module? The British Industrial Revolution 52

53 Your Turn to Write a Task Step 2: What reading standard (in addition to #1 and 10) will be targeted/taught through this module? RH9-10.9 Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources. 53

54 Your Turn to Write a Task Step 3: What GLE(s) will be targeted/taught through this module? Students will analyze the factors and conditions needed to industrialize and to expand industrial production as well as shifts in economic practices. Students will examine changes and innovations in energy, technology, communication, and transportation that enabled industrialization. Students will investigate the social, political, and economic impacts of industrialization… 54

55 Your Turn to Write a Task Step 4: What writing standard(s) will be targeted/taught through this module? WHST9-10.1 Write arguments focused on discipline-specific Content… and WHST9-10.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. 55

56 Your Turn to Write a Task Step 5: What do you want students to learn while studying this topic (enduring understandings)? Students should understand that there benefits of the British Industrial Revolution, but also that there were costs. 56

57 Your Turn to Write a Task Step 6: Considering your topic, ask yourself what text structure would be most conducive to a successful student response (i.e. compare/contrast, define, describe, cause/effect, etc.)? Original Task 2 Template (Argumentation/Analysis): [Insert question] After reading ________ (literature or informational texts), write a/an ________ (essay or substitute) that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the text(s). L2 Be sure to acknowledge competing views. L3 Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position. 57

58 Your Turn to Write a Task Step 7: Decide if you will begin the teaching task with a question. Decide which (if any) demands to include in the teaching task. Were the achievements and growth of the Industrial Revolution Era worth the cost to society? After reading secondary and primary sources pertaining to the British Industrial Revolution, write an argumentation essay that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the texts. Be sure to acknowledge competing views. 58

59 Jury Draft Teaching Tasks Offer one compliment Pose one question 59

60 The text selection is critical! Look for the perfect balance: -reading level of students -complexity of text (demands on skills and stamina of reader) -background knowledge required for comprehension -sufficiency of content for writing task Keep Gradual Release in mind: -whole group -small group -independent Be sure text provides students with information needed to respond completely to the teaching task. If an argumentation task, be sure the quantity and content of texts arent biased. More on text complexity tomorrow… Choosing the Texts (and if desired, multi-media) 60

61 Creating an Overview Written to colleagues Include who, what, when, where, why, how This module sits inside a unit in which students study the Age of Revolution and the focus of the module is on the British Industrial Revolution. Students will draw on content studied during the unit and their readings of primary and secondary sources about the module topic to write an argumentative essay… 61

62 Creating the Background Section Written to the students Include who, what, when, where, why, how In this module you apply what you learned in the unit on the Age of Revolution to assess whether the achievements of the British Industrial Revolution outweighed the societal cost. You should draw on what you have learned in the unit and apply the reading, research, and writing skills you learned throughout the semester thus far. 62

63 Supports What assistance is available? 63

64 Supports www.reachassoc.net 64

65 LDC Website www.ldc.org 65

66 Work Session 66 Set up an account on CoreTools Complete Section 1 of your module: Overview/Description Grade Level Template Task Teaching Task Standards Background for Students Explore www.ldc.orgwww.ldc.org Explore www.reachassoc.netwww.reachassoc.net

67 Exit Slip - Something that you are excited by - A question you have - A goal you are setting for yourself 67

68 68


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