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A framework to move from common core to classroom practice Lexington, Kentucky Revisiting LDC April 18, 2014 1.

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Presentation on theme: "A framework to move from common core to classroom practice Lexington, Kentucky Revisiting LDC April 18, 2014 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 A framework to move from common core to classroom practice Lexington, Kentucky Revisiting LDC April 18,

2 Overview of the Sessions 2

3 Outcomes Develop a deeper understanding writing LDC modules Gain a deeper understanding of the role of text complexity Share high-leverage instructional strategies Calibrate expectations when scoring and analyzing student work Explore Socratic Seminar as an effective strategy for synthesizing information 3

4 Norms What working agreements will help make today be successful for you? 4

5 Guiding Questions How is LDC a strategy for implementing the common core? How does our conversation benefit the students we service? How does our conversation impact instruction in our classrooms? 5

6 ` How is LDC a strategy for implementing the common core? After reading informational texts, participating in discussions, and engaging with multimedia, write notes, to be used in a Socratic Seminar, that explain the impact of this strategy on students. What conclusions or implications can you draw? Cite at least 3 sources, pointing out key elements from each source. (Task 19: Informational/Synthesis) 6

7 A Look at LDC in the Classroom Literacy Matters What do you notice that the teacher is saying and doing? What do you notice that the students are saying and doing? 7

8 Instructional Shifts Required by the Common Core  Increasing rigor and relevance  Sharing responsibility of teaching reading and writing across content areas  Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction and informational text  Reading, writing, speaking and listening grounded in evidence from texts  Practicing regularly with complex text and its academic vocabulary  Emphasizing 3 modes of academic writing 8

9 Jigsaw How does LDC support the implementation of the instructional shifts and expectations demanded by the Common Core State Standards? 9

10 Instructional Shifts Required by the Common Core  Increasing rigor and relevance  Reading, writing, speaking and listening grounded in evidence from texts  Sharing responsibility of teaching reading and writing across content areas  Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction and informational text  Practicing regularly with complex text and its academic vocabulary  Emphasizing 3 modes of academic writing 10

11 Overview of the LDC Framework 11

12 Introduce Collection 2 Task 2 Template (Argumentation/Analysis): [Insert optional question] After reading ________ (literature or informational texts), write a/an ________ (essay or substitute) in which you address the question and argue_______(content) Support your position with evidence from the text(s). Task 14 Template: (Informational/Description): [Insert optional question] After reading ________ (literature or informational texts), write a/an ________ (essay, report, or substitute) in which you describe ________ (content). Support your discussion with evidence from the text(s). 12

13 Demands Demands are additional writing and cognitive challenges that you can add to a template task. Demands are developed from language in the CCSS. Demands can scaffold your instruction. 13

14 Demands You may choose one or more of these demands (D) to increase the challenge: D1 Be sure to acknowledge competing views. D2 Give ____(one; #) example/s from past or current ____ (events; issues) to illustrate and clarify your position. D3 What _____(conclusions; implications) can you draw ____? D4 In your discussion, address the credibility and origin of sources in view of your research topic. D5 Identify any gaps or unanswered questions. D6 Use ________ (stylistic devices) to develop your work. D7 Use ________ (techniques) to convey multiple storylines. D8 Include ________ (e.g. bibliography, citations, references, endnotes). 14

15 Task 21: [Insert optional question] After reading ________ (literature or informational texts), write a/an ________ (report, essay or substitutes) in which you analyze ________ (content), providing examples to clarify your analysis. (Informational or Explanatory/Analysis) Task 21 (Informational or Explanatory/Analysis): What is the theme of the poem Mother to Son? After reading Mother to Son and an informational text on metaphors, write an essay for our class literary magazine in which you analyze how Langston Hughes’ use of metaphors contributes to an understanding of the theme of this poem, providing examples to clarify your analysis. Include a bibliography. LDC Template Task  Teaching Task Teachers fill–in-the-blank by choosing: text - writing product - content - text structure 15

16 Strong Teaching Tasks: Are worthy of 2, 3 or 4 weeks of instruction Ask students to grapple with important content to the discipline Provide opportunities to read informational text of appropriate text complexity and content specific to the grade level Have students working in the most effective mode of discourse/text structure Evolve from a rigorous text-dependent question directly related to the content being taught Involve products written for an authentic audiences Important Note: Engage students in completing a balanced set of writing tasks over the course of the year 16

17 Discipline Specific Grade 7 ELA Task Template 2 — Argumentation & Analysis When, if ever, is it morally responsible to disobey authority? After reading primary and secondary document sources write a speech to the mayor and local officials that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the texts. RI7.8 Which author articulates the most convincing claim as to when it is morally responsible to disobey authority? After reading primary and secondary document sources, write an essay to display at our upcoming literary sharing session that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the texts. 17

18 Strong Teaching Tasks: Are worthy of 2, 3 or 4 weeks of instruction Ask students to grapple with important content to the discipline Provide opportunities to read informational text of appropriate text complexity and content specific to the grade level Have students working in the most effective mode of discourse/text structure Evolve from a rigorous text-dependent question directly related to the content being taught Involve products written for an authentic audiences Important Note: Engage students in completing a balanced set of writing tasks over the course of the year 18

19 Jurying Teaching Tasks 19

20 Write a Task Choose a topic and/or texts Identify the targeted standard(s) and GLEs Decide what you want students to learn Determine mode of writing Informational or Argumentation Determine text structure Choose a template task Write the proposed teaching task Decide which demands you will include 20

21 Checklist for Teaching Tasks 21

22 Jury Draft Teaching Tasks Offer one compliment Pose one question 22

23 Jurying Modules How are modules deemed ‘exemplar’? How can we support this process? 23

24 Jurying a Module -Section 1: What Task -Section 2: What Skills -Section 3: What Instruction 5 Most Effective Components 24 Investment Research Retelling Corduroy

25 The text selection is critical! Look for the perfect balance: -reading level of students -complexity of text (demands on skills and stamina of reader) -background knowledge required for comprehension -sufficiency of content for writing task Keep Gradual Release in mind: -whole group -small group -independent Be sure text provides students with information needed to respond completely to the teaching task. If an argumentation task, be sure the quantity and content of texts arent biased. Choosing the Texts (and if desired, multi-media) 25

26 Text Complexity Quantitative Measures Qualitative Characteristics Considerations of Readers and Task 26

27 Quantitative Dimensions …refer to those aspects of text complexity, such as word length or frequency, sentence length, and text cohesion, that are difficult … for a human reader to evaluate efficiently… and are thus today typically measured by computer software 27

28 Qualitative Characteristics …refer to those aspects of text complexity best measured or only measurable by an attentive human reader, such as levels of meaning or purpose; structure; language conventionality and clarity; and knowledge demands. -Levels of Meaning (literary texts) or Purpose (informational texts) -Structure -Language Conventionality and Clarity -Knowledge Demands: Life Experiences (literary texts) -Knowledge Demands: Cultural/Literary Knowledge (literary texts) -Knowledge Demands: Content/Discipline Knowledge (informational texts) 28

29 Qualitative Features of Text 29

30 Matching Reader and Task …variables specific to particular readers (such as motivation, knowledge, and experiences) and to particular tasks (such as purpose and the complexity of the task assigned and the questions posed) must also be considered… Such assessments are best made by teachers employing their professional judgment, experience, and knowledge of their students and the subject. 30

31 Text Complexity Read page one of The Book Thief excerpt Lexile Level = 730L 2 nd -3 rd Grade Recommended Lexile Levels = th -5 th Grade Recommended Lexile Levels = What are the qualitative features noted? 31

32 Example - The Book Thief 32

33 33 Quantitative Analysis 730 Lexile Qualitative Analysis Text Structure - Complex Language Features – Complex Meaning - Complex Knowledge Demands – Somewhat Complex The Book Thief The Book Thief would probably be most appropriate in middle school. Specifically 7 th -8 th grade Less mature readers could definitely read and understand pieces of, but a more sophisticated read does it more justice.

34 Collegial Sharing of Best Practices Give One – Get One Quick Write – Instructional Strategy for: Preparing for the Task Developing Vocabulary Active Reading and Note-Taking Bridging Conversation from Reading to Writing Writing, Planning and Development Revision and Editing Alignment between all components is critical! Creates an opportunity for a formative cycle! 34

35 High Leverage Instructional Strategies Deconstructing the Teaching Task Translating the Rubric 35

36 Skill Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task Recommended Strategy: Deconstruct the Teaching Task What are the features of an ideal mixed economy? After reading informational texts, editorials, and an interactive infographic write an essay for the school newspaper that compares the characteristics of market and command economies and argues what combination of characteristics would be most effective for the United States today. Be sure to support your position with evidence from the texts. 36

37 Skill Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task Recommended Strategy: Translate the Rubric What are the features of an ideal mixed economy? After reading informational texts, editorials, and an interactive infographic write an essay for the school newspaper that compares the characteristics of market and command economies and argues what combination of characteristics would be most effective for the United States today. Be sure to support your position with evidence from the texts. 37

38 Rubric Elements within the Context of the Teaching Task Focus – Addresses key aspects of prompt in a detailed response; stays on task My essay will stay on the topic of a mixed economy. I will compare the characteristics of market and command economies. I will make a claim about which combination of these characteristics would be most beneficial in the US today. 38

39 What Results? What Results? – Section 4 Scoring Student Work with the LDC Rubric Can be used to score holistically or analytically 2 rubrics – Informative/explanatory & Argumentative 7 Scoring Elements: Focus Controlling Idea Reading/Research Development Organization Conventions Content Understanding 39

40 LDC Rubrics – Scoring v. Grading The LDC rubric… provides feedback to students and teachers helps students know expectations prior to completing the task helps teachers gauge the effectiveness of their instructional choices 40

41 Common Misconceptions about Scoring with the LDC Rubric Confusion between Focus and Controlling Idea Grading only the final product Using a straight percentage score for a grade 41

42 Collaborative Scoring 42

43 LDC Is Not a program a set of materials Is an instructional strategy a framework 43

44 How does LDC look and sound? Teaching Task - highlighted daily Gradual Release of Responsibility Students empowered and held accountable as learners Instruction and facilitation High level of engagement Daily oral and written discourse Active reading Academic writing Formative Assessment Academic Behaviors Goal setting and reflection by students 44

45 What is special about the LDC strategy? Aligns with Common Core StandardsDistributes responsibility for teaching reading and writingMakes tasks central – teaching tasks and mini tasksConnects reading and writing instruction with contentFosters a formative teaching and learning systemEncourages creativity and local choiceSupports effective teaching 45

46 Skill Cluster 3: Transition to Writing Possible Strategy: Socratic Seminar https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/teaching-the-n-word 46

47 Socratic Seminar: Expectations We read and think about the text in advance. We refer to the text and give enough time for fellow classmates to locate text. We engage in conversation; we don’t talk at each other. We show we are listening by tracking the speaker and summarizing what a classmate said. We don’t raise our hand, but we wait for speaker to finish. We ask questions, give comments, but always give evidence to support our opinions. 47

48 Follow-Up Questions Tell me more about that. What about the reading made you think that ___? Using evidence, convince us that __. In what other context does that idea play out? What evidence would you give to someone who thought ___? Based on what we have read, what do you think that we will discover in the next chapter? After reading this information, how would handle a situation like ___? How is your answer different or the same from others? So, this leads to you to what conclusions? What did you discover? Adapted from 48

49 Socratic Seminar It’s OKAY to disagree, so long as you do so respectfully I understand what you are saying, but I disagree because… I respect your opinion, but I disagree because… I hear where you are coming from, but… Most importantly, in a discussion there are no right or wrong answers. 49

50 Sentence Starters So what you’re saying is… I disagree/agree… I’d like to raise a question… I’m confused about… What is your opinion of… I think this means… What puzzles me is… This relates to… Do you agree/disagree…. Don’t you think this is similar to… I’d like to talk with people about… 50

51 Readying for a Socratic Seminar Annotating text: How is LDC a strategy for implementing the common core? RI-1: Ask yourself - and make notes (underline, circle, record important information in the margins) - about what the text says explicitly and what inferences you can logically make from the text. Record specific textual evidence that addresses the teaching task/guiding questions. 51

52 ` How is LDC a strategy for implementing the common core? After reading informational texts, participating in discussions, and engaging with multimedia, write notes, to be used in a Socratic Seminar, that explain the impact of this strategy on students. What conclusions or implications can you draw? Cite at least 3 sources, pointing out key elements from each source. (Task 19: Informational/Synthesis) 52

53 We Have Been Discussing… How is LDC a strategy for implementing the common core? How does our conversation benefit the students we service? How does our conversation impact instruction in our classrooms? 53

54 Socratic Seminar If your principal had no prior LDC training, can you justify spending 20 instructional days on an LDC module? 54

55 Readying for a Socratic Seminar Reviewing notes Reviewing roles Setting a goal 55

56 Sentence Starters So what you’re saying is…” I disagree/agree… I’d like to raise a question: I’m confused about What is your opinion of… I think this means… What puzzles me is… This relates to… Do you agree/disagree…. Don’t you think this is similar to… I’d like to talk with people about… 56

57 Supports What are expectations? What assistance is available? 57

58 Supports 58

59 LDC Website 59

60 Work Session 60

61 Questions and Answers Exit Slip 61

62 Feel free to be in touch… Diane - Jody – 62


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