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BRAIDED FUNDING PRESENTED BY VICKIE CHOITZ, CLASP; DR. ARTURO MARTINEZ, MILWAUKEE AREA TECHNICAL COLLEGE; AND BETH ARMAN, COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF BALTIMORE.

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Presentation on theme: "BRAIDED FUNDING PRESENTED BY VICKIE CHOITZ, CLASP; DR. ARTURO MARTINEZ, MILWAUKEE AREA TECHNICAL COLLEGE; AND BETH ARMAN, COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF BALTIMORE."— Presentation transcript:

1 BRAIDED FUNDING PRESENTED BY VICKIE CHOITZ, CLASP; DR. ARTURO MARTINEZ, MILWAUKEE AREA TECHNICAL COLLEGE; AND BETH ARMAN, COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF BALTIMORE COUNTY National Council For Workforce Education Milwaukee, Wisconsin October 17, 2013

2 NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR WORKFORCE EDUCATION MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN OCTOBER 17, 2013 PRESENTED BY DR. ARTURO MARTINEZ ELL/Welding A Credentialed Career Pathway Bridge Model

3 Working Learners: Educating Our Entire Workforce For Success In The 21st Century Louis Soares June 2009

4 ELL/Welding Career Pathway Model Key Program Elements Dr. Arturo Martinez Associate Dean - MATC The Career Pathway Program shifts from the traditional Training Certificate to a Credential Certificate Program that: Facilitates a process where students are engaged in hands-on and academic activities and earn college credits, Provides students with an opportunity to gain vocational skills needed for entry into the welding workforce, Prepares students to enhance their academic skills in reading, writing, and math needed to successfully complete the college level courses, and Allows students to earn college credits that count towards a one year diploma program so that students can continue their college pathway needed for further advancement in the workforce.

5 ELL/Welding Career Pathway Partners Dr. Arturo Martinez Associate Dean - MATC Funding Wisconsin Technical College System General Purpose Revenue Funds targeted for Career Pathway programs to serve Adult Basic Skills (ABE) students. Type of Career Pathway An Embedded Model - Embed basic skills into a skill certificate that can lead directly to employment or further study MATC - Internal School Partners School of Pre-College/Office of Bilingual Education – Serves ABE students but does not offer post-secondary program courses And The School of Technology and Applied Science – Provides the post-secondary college credit welding diploma program. Has linkage with employers in the welding industry.

6 Welding Pathway Courses Pre-College Contextualized ABE Courses  Basic Communications courses offered from October, 2012 to December 2012  Basic Arithmetic courses offered from October 2012 to December 2012  Basic Arithmetic contextualized with Welding Trades Mathematics April 2013 to June 2013 Credit Base Welding Courses (Chunked with Diploma Program)  QLTYIN -403 –Safety Prep/MSSC Certificate  WELD -313 Shielded Metal Arc Welding Practices  WELD-380 Welding Trades Mathematics  WELD-361 Basic Blueprint Reading for Welders  WELD -352 Gas-Shielded Arc Welding Processes Dr. Arturo Martinez Associate Dean - MATC

7 Internal MATC Department Cost Sharing Dr. Arturo Martinez Associate Dean - MATC State WTCS - Grant funded ABE/ELL – faculty $13,000 Educational Assistant Support $10,400 Text books – class-room supplies $7,600 Student application fee $14,000 MATC - Department Cost Contribution Welding faculty - $15,000 Grant match required Used the grant funds to cover their supply needs $3,000 Covered the tuition cost for students needed for the Welding courses to be offered as college courses

8 ELL Welding Student Program Cost Dr. Arturo Martinez Associate Dean - MATC Course Cr. Tuition Fees Books Cost per Student Program Paid Student Paid QLTYIN -403 Safety Prep/MSSC Certificate $ WELD -313 Shielded Metal Arc Welding Practices 5 $ WELD-380 Welding Trades Mathematics 1 $ $ $ WELD-361 Basic Blueprint Reading for Welders 1 $ $ $ WELD -352 Gas-Shielded Arc Welding Processes 1 $ $ $ $ 1,507.28$ $ 1,814.53$ 1,382.41$ HIRE C. Paid Program Paid Student Paid Milwaukee Area Workforce Investment Board -HIRE Center (1 student) $ 1,359.21$ $

9 Dr. Arturo Martinez Associate Dean - MATC Welding One Year Diploma – 30 credits Certificate Chunked CreditsNeeded to obtain one year Welding Diploma WELd-313 Shielded Metal Arc Welding -5 WELD 314 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding -5 WELD 351 Shielded Metal Arc Welding Processes - 1 WELD 350 GTAW Processes - 1 WELD 360 Blueprint Reading for Welders - 2 WELD 380 Welding Trades Mathematics- 1 WELD 315 Gas Metal Arc Welding Practices -5 WELD 316 Layout and Setup Practices -5 WELD 352 Gas-Shielded Arc Welding Processes - 1 WELD 354 Layout and Print Reading Practices - 2 SOCSCI 330 Applied Economics and Human Relations -1 ENG 347 Communication Skills - 1 Total one year diploma credits - 30 Certificate Chunked credits - 9 Credits needed to complete One-year Welding diploma program - 21

10 Program Outcomes 14 students enrolled in the ELL/Welding Program 13 program participants earned  The Certified Production Technician Safety Certificate (MSSC)  One student entered the program after the MSSC course was offered. 11 program participants earned -79% completion rate  Eight post-secondary college credits (chunked within a one year Welding Diploma) Two program participants advanced in their employment Two program participants didn’t complete the program but found employment in the welding field. Eight program participants have expressed an interest to continue to pursue the Welding one year diploma program at MATC Dr. Arturo Martinez Associate Dean - MATC

11 Classroom Hands-On Dr. Arturo Martinez Associate Dean - MATC

12 Presentation of MSSC Certificate Dr. Arturo Martinez Associate Dean - MATC

13 Without your help I would not have completed the program Dr. Arturo Martinez Associate Dean - MATC

14 The Next Steps to a Welding Diploma Dr. Arturo Martinez Associate Dean - MATC

15 Students Display their MSSC & Welding Credit Certificate Dr. Arturo Martinez Associate Dean - MATC

16 NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR WORKFORCE EDUCATION MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN OCTOBER 17, 2013 PRESENTED BY BETH M. ARMAN Construction Pre-Apprenticeship

17 Program History Goal: start a Construction Pre-Apprenticeship program Underlying rationales:  Provide qualified applicants to our apprenticeship partners  Diversify the pool of apprenticeship applicants  Enable community residents to get good-paying jobs after a short training period Beth M. Arman, Director - CCBC

18 Program History Awarded a Community-Based Job Training Grant from U.S. Department of Labor Grant paid for:  Faculty  Professional development  Rent for facility (extension center planned)  Equipment  Consumable supplies  Books  Tuition Beth M. Arman, Director - CCBC

19 Program History Problem: extension center delayed – no facility A new partnership was born:  MD Department of Juvenile Services (DJS)  MD State Department of Education (MSDE)  Industry partners, union and non-union  Held our first cohort of classes at a youth treatment facility  years old, preference given to students who were 18+ Because of this experience, asked to collaborate on a grant with DJS Beth M. Arman, Director - CCBC

20 Program History DJS awarded grant; CCBC was a sub-contractor  Young Offender Re-Entry Grant, U.S. Department of Labor  CCBC’s role:  Pre-Apprenticeship training for older youth  Career Transition specialists to work with all students Beth M. Arman, Director - CCBC

21 Program History Developed 150-hour course series: Construction Pre-Apprenticeship Successful completers receive:  First Aid/CPR card  OSHA 10 for Construction card  NCCER certification, Core  AFL-CIO certification, Multi-Craft Core  CCBC con ed certificates (each class and program as a whole) Beth M. Arman, Director - CCBC

22 Program History Began running 2 concurrent pre-apprenticeship programs:  1 for adults, very few restrictions  1 for Baltimore city youth, ages (with preference for 18+), in the DJS system Each grant had its own faculty/coordinator, shared adjunct faculty  When an instructor taught adults, paid from CBJT grant  When an instructor taught youth, paid from Re-Entry grant Split costs such as supplies, NCCER student certificates – each grant paid their share Beth M. Arman, Director - CCBC

23 Program History Later began running out of appropriate students on DJS grant Scheduled simultaneous classes  If we got enough adults and youth to justify separate cohorts, we ran separate cohorts; each grant covered own costs  If we didn’t, we combined adults and youth into a single cohort and charged each grant according to its share of students  CBJT Grant ended before Youth Re-Entry; later used same model, combining open-enrollment with Youth Re-Entry Beth M. Arman, Director - CCBC

24 Current Status, Post-Grants CBJT Grant ended 3/31/12 Re-Entry Grant ended 6/30/13 Transitioned – with some bumps – to program supported primarily by tuition and fees Far fewer cohorts, and cohorts are smaller Beth M. Arman, Director - CCBC

25 Current Status, Post-Grants How do we cover costs now?  Coordinator is on college operating budget, now has larger scope of work – not solely focused on Pre-Apprenticeship  College gets FTE money from state, covers many indirect costs  We pay for adjunct faculty and supplies from tuition and fees ($1,399 for a 150-hour program)  Many students qualify for institutional Opportunity Grant: previously $500, now can be up to $1,000 for a series of courses like this  Some students receive other funds –local philanthropic organizations, Workforce Investment Act (WIA), Trade Adjustment Act (TAA), even gifts/loans from family members Beth M. Arman, Director - CCBC

26 Current Status, Post-Grants Occasionally have other grants or contracts  State Highway Administration:  Did 1 contract training cohort; may do others in future  SHA has US Department of Transportation funding to promote highway construction careers for under-served populations  I-BEST program; combined construction trades with GED instruction  Program free to participants; costs covered by SHA Beth M. Arman, Director - CCBC

27 Current Status, Post-Grants Occasionally have other grants or contracts  ACE Grant (Accelerating Connections to Employment – part of US Department of Labor Workforce Innovations fund):  Slated to start 1 st cohort in November  I-BEST program; combining construction trades with ESOL  Program free to participants; costs covered by ACE grant  Randomized study; not everyone who wants to participate will be able to do so – will some end up going into regular program? Beth M. Arman, Director - CCBC

28 Program Outcomes Under CBJT grant:  17 Core cohorts, 7 Specialty cohorts (NCCER Level 1 – Electrical, Carpentry, Plumbing, Power Generation)  96% of participants completed at least 1 NCCER module  277 enrolled, 185 completed (67%)  95, or 51%, got jobs after training  Removing original DJS cohort + 2 Department of Corrections cohorts, 65% completion and 60% job placement  Placements with IBEW, Plumbers and Steamfitters, Carpenters, Laborers, facility maintenance companies, home improvement companies, etc. Beth M. Arman, Director - CCBC

29 Program Outcomes Under Youth Re-Entry grant:  11 Core cohorts (many co-listed with other cohorts), 5 shorter courses  86 enrolled, 42 completed (49%)  93% completed at least 1 NCCER module  Stopped collecting job placement data as we got younger and younger students  Couldn’t place in most construction jobs if not 18  Job placement seen as a bonus, not a requirement for grant  Primary focus was some type of positive outcome such as graduation or continued educational enrollment, no new involvement with criminal justice system Beth M. Arman, Director - CCBC

30 Program Outcomes Post-grants:  3 Core cohorts that were partly or exclusively open-enrollment, total of 12 open-enrollment students  1 SHA Core cohort, 28 people  1 Electrical Specialty cohort, 4 people  Smaller groups but more motivated students – they are paying their own way, or at least covering part of it Beth M. Arman, Director - CCBC

31 Electrical Lab Plumbing Lab Beth M. Arman, Director - CCBC Photos

32 Carpentry Lab Students at Work Beth M. Arman, Director - CCBC Photos


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