Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

STEM: Progression from GCSE to A Level Andrew Powell (Schools Analysis and Research Division) and Aileen Clement (Curriculum Unit) Presentation at DCSF.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "STEM: Progression from GCSE to A Level Andrew Powell (Schools Analysis and Research Division) and Aileen Clement (Curriculum Unit) Presentation at DCSF."— Presentation transcript:

1 STEM: Progression from GCSE to A Level Andrew Powell (Schools Analysis and Research Division) and Aileen Clement (Curriculum Unit) Presentation at DCSF Conference: The Use of Evidence in Policy Development and Delivery, 9 February 2010

2 What is the STEM agenda?  The future economic success of the UK is dependent upon a good supply of skilled scientists and engineers.  Publication of Science & Innovation Investment Framework (SIIF) 2004 – 2014 (HMT, DTI & DfES) in July 2004 called for a step change in: –Achievement in science at Key Stage 4 (14 – 16 years) –Increase in post-16 progression –Proportion of students pursuing R&D careers –Proportion of BME and women in Higher Education

3 Science and maths A level entries between 1996 and 2006

4 Focus on the 5 – 19 STEM Agenda…  The Government’s ambition is to create an education and training environment that delivers the best in science and maths teaching and learning at every stage.  In March 2006 the Government published the Science and Innovation Investment Framework : Next Steps which announced ambitions to increase: –The number of pupils getting level 6+ at Key Stage 3 (11 – 14 year olds); –The number of pupils achieving A*-B and A*-C grades in two science GCSEs; –A level physics, chemistry and mathematics entries whilst maintaining A level biology entries; and –The recruitment, retraining and retention of physics, chemistry and mathematics specialist teachers.  Responsibility for the STEM agenda is shared between the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) and the Department of Business Innovation and Skills (BIS). The DCSF leads on the 5 – 19 schools remit whilst BIS is responsible for the STEM agenda in further and higher education.

5 What are our key priorities?  Increasing post-16 take up of science and maths at A level particularly take up of physics  Improving the quality of teaching and learning  Increasing workforce capacity and teacher supply  Improving the curriculum and qualifications  Improving young people’s attitudes towards science and maths

6 Triple Science GCSEs (Individual GCSEs in physics, chemistry and biology)

7 Why focus on triple science? Our analysis shows that pupils studying triple science GCSEs are more likely to progress to A level physics, chemistry and biology than those pupils entering other Key Stage 4 (14 – 16 year olds) science qualifications.

8 But Double Science* remains the route through which most pupils progress to A level science… *GCSE Core and Additional Science from 2006

9  Over 90% of A level science pupils achieved level 6 or 7 in Key Stage 3 science  And over 90% of level 6+ Key Stage 3 pupils take either GCSE triple or double science KS3 science levels of A level science pupils KS4 science subjects taken by high attaining pupils High attaining Key Stage 3 pupils progress to A level Science

10 But those progressing via GCSE triple science are more likely to progress to A level Science High attaining pupils are more likely to progress to A level science if they enter GCSE triple science rather than double science: 45% of triple science pupils progress to A level science 19% of double science pupils progress to A level science

11 Developing the triple science target… Steady increase in triple science entries but only a small proportion of pupils entering In % of all pupils and 6% of maintained pupils entered triple science

12 Developing the triple science target…  Original target proposed that 14% of pupils in maintained schools should be studying triple science in  Increases in take up suggested a more ambitious target may be needed… but this would require more level 6 pupils to take triple science This increase will need an extra 50,000 pupils to be entering triple science in 2014 from 2006 levels Between 2002 and 2006 an extra 10,000 pupils entered triple science

13 Developing the triple science target…  In February 2009, the Prime Minister announced the Government’s commitment to increase access to triple science to ensure: -that all pupils in maintained schools have access to triple science GCSEs by 2014 and -that we will double the number of state school pupils taking the three science subjects to 17% by 2014 (based on 8.5% in 2008)

14 So what’s the impact…? The proportion of maintained schools offering triple science has more than doubled since data shows that over 40% of maintained schools in England offer access to triple science GCSEs, an increase of 9ppt on 2008.

15  All maintained schools will offer access to triple science by  Impact is a likely increase in the number of pupils entering triple science and a likely increase in pupils entering A level sciences (physics, chemistry and biology) If the same proportion of triple science pupils enter A level science in 2014 this will mean that around 16,000 extra pupils in maintained schools will enter an A level science subject in 2014 – an increase of 30% from 2009 So what’s the impact…?

16 What are we doing to increase take up of triple science?  Introduction of a statutory entitlement to two science GCSEs to be enshrined by pupil guarantee in 21st Century Schools White Paper;  Over £6million investment between 2009 – 2011 to provide support to schools to offer access to triple science through the triple science support programme; and  Range of programmes to improve the recruitment, retention, and retraining of science teachers including increasing teacher training bursaries, accredited courses for science and maths teachers and golden hello for new teachers.

17 Increasing A level entries in Science and Maths

18 Prior attainment is the biggest factor associated with A level Maths take up

19 And for Physics take up, although Gender is also a significant factor

20 Developing the A Level Maths target…  Originally that 56,000 pupils will enter the subject in 2014…but the target was met by 2008!  A new target of 80,000 maths A level entries was agreed.

21 Large increase in A Level Maths entries between 2008 and 2009 An increase of 3,000 entries was required to remain on course for the revised 2014 target. In fact the increase was 7, ,056 pupils entered AS level maths in 2008 – hopefully a similar number will continue to A level in 2009

22 On track for Biology and Chemistry targets, but below trajectory for Physics The 2010 points show the number of pupils entering the AS level subjects in Hopefully a good proportion of these pupils will proceed to A level

23 Next Steps

24 Targets and trajectories Trends in A level entries for physics, chemistry, biology and maths including forecast until 2014

25 What are we doing to increase take up?  Increasing post-16 take up of science and maths A level - triple science support programme working with over 1000 schools; revised secondary curriculum; enrichment & enhancement activities e.g. over 500 STEM Clubs and promotion of practical work in partnership with SCORE and ASE.  Improving the quality of teaching and learning - national network of Science Learning Centres providing over 11,700 training days per annum; Project Enthuse bursaries; National Centre for Excellence in the Teaching of Mathematics (NCETM); National Strategies CPD to raise attainment and Stimulating Physics Network providing support across England.  Increasing workforce capacity and teacher supply – maths, physics and chemistry teacher training bursary (£9,000), golden hello (£5,000); Student Associate Scheme; accredited courses in science and maths for 400 teachers; STEM mentoring scheme (600 teachers by 2010) and extra £22m funding to TDA to support additional recruitment of priority subjects including science and maths teachers in response to increased demand.

26 What are we doing to increase take up?  Getting the curriculum and and qualifications right - statutory entitlement to two science GCSEs; non-statutory entitlement to study triple science for those who would benefit; new pupil guarantee will enshrine both these entitlements; development of the Diploma in Science; and revised maths and science GCSEs.  Improving young people’s attitudes towards science and maths – three year science and maths campaign to raise awareness of career opportunities; National Careers Coordinator; careers support and guidance for young people; Big Bang Fair promoting STEM careers and DCSF IAG strategy including a commitment that all secondary school pupils should have access to careers education and information to enable them to make informed choices.

27 Forward work programme  Monitor and review progress e.g. through GCSE and A level results.  Identify and analyse specific issues to get a detailed understanding of what is happening and why.  Current examples include analysing the possible reasons for the substantial increase in A level maths take up and monitoring take up of Level 2 science qualifications by pupil type.

28 Contact Us Andy Powell (SARD) Aileen Clement (Curriculum Unit)


Download ppt "STEM: Progression from GCSE to A Level Andrew Powell (Schools Analysis and Research Division) and Aileen Clement (Curriculum Unit) Presentation at DCSF."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google