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Jazmon Calhoun John Dogan Summer Lewis Edward Refuerzo Sarah Wilks.

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Presentation on theme: "Jazmon Calhoun John Dogan Summer Lewis Edward Refuerzo Sarah Wilks."— Presentation transcript:

1 Jazmon Calhoun John Dogan Summer Lewis Edward Refuerzo Sarah Wilks

2 Prompt From a novel or play with literary merit, select an important character who is a villain. Analyze the nature of the character’s villainy and shows how it enhances meaning in the work.

3 What is a villain? OOne blamed for a particular evil or difficulty AA character in a story who opposes the hero; the antagonist AA deliberate scoundrel or criminal

4 Who is the Villain in Frankenstein?  The creature could be considered a villain because he not only is an actual criminal (murder), but he also opposed his creator.  Oddly enough, he began as a gentle creation, but was turned into a villain due to the reactions to his horrific appearance.

5 “CURSED, CURSED creator! Why did I live? Why, in that instant, did I not extinguish the spark of existence which you had so wantonly bestowed? I know not; despair had not yet taken possession of me; my feelings were those of rage and revenge. I could with pleasure have destroyed the cottage and its inhabitants, and have glutted myself with their shrieks and misery” (Shelley 97). This was one of the many instances when the creature had felt that everyone around him had been turned against him. Due to this happening on so many occasions, it fueled his hatred towards Dr. Frankenstein.

6 “Frankenstein! You belong then to my enemy- to him towards whom I have sworn eternal revenge; you shall be my first victim” (Shelley 102) This is a pivotal point in which the creation dreadfully reaches his breaking point and turns into the villain of the story. He finds out that the little boy is Dr. Frankenstein’s father, and loses control! The thought of annihalating his creator just overtook him, and as the creature was trying to silence the boy, he murdered him!

7 Six Step Thesis 1. The villain enhanced. 2. The once innocent villain greatly enhanced. 3. In the novel Frankenstein, the once innocent villain greatly enhanced the plot of the story. 4. In the novel Frankenstein, the once innocent villain, Frankenstein’s creature, greatly enhanced the plot of the story. 5. In the novel Frankenstein, the once innocent villain, Frankenstein’s creature, greatly enhanced the plot of the story, through his journey towards evil. 6. In the novel Frankenstein, the once innocent villain, Frankenstein’s creature, greatly enhanced the plot of the story, through his journey towards evil, as he was rejected by society, began murdering in vengeance, and finally destroyed his creator.

8 Example Within the Novel ““ …from that moment I declared ever lasting war against the species and more than all against him who had formed me and sent me forth to this unsupportable misery” (Shelley 97). TThrough the unacceptance of the villagers and their unparalleled reactions to the creature’s horrendous face, the creature had drawn the conclusion that the human race should be finished off. Most of all, the creature was furious at Dr. Frankenstein because the misery was overwhelming. His inner villain had awaken inside of him, and he wanted to destroy everything and everyone in his path.

9 Foreshadowing  “It is well. I go; but remember, I shall be with you on your wedding-night.” (Shelly 123)  The following statement is said by the creature after Frankenstein destroys his bride that he promised to make for the creature. This shows how determined the creature is to have his vengeance on his creator and, later in the story, how intelligent the creature is towards his plan. His words has brought Frankenstein to worry that he will die on his wedding, thus he prepares to take on his creation. This, however, was part of the creature’s plan as it left his newly wedded wife, Elizabeth, unprotected. The successful murder of Elizabeth planned out by the creature has completely ruined Frankenstein.

10 A L L U S I O N  “Devil…Do you dare approach me? And do not you fear the fierce vengeance of my arm wreaked on your miserable head? Begone, vile insect! Or rather, stay, that I may trample you to dust! And, oh! That I could with the extinction of your miserable existence, restore those victims whom you have so diabolically murdered!” (Shelley 83).  There is an allusion because Mary Shelley is referencing ‘Paradise Lost’. That novel focuses on the dreaded Satan to which the creature is referred to as a creature just like the creature that Victor Frankenstein had created.

11 Signs/Omens  “His yellow skin scarcely covered the work of muscles and arteries beneath; his hair was of a lustrous black, and flowing; his teeth of pearly whiteness; but these luxuriances only formed a more horrid contrast with his watery eyes, that seemed almost the same colour as the dun-white sockets in which they were set, his shriveled complexion and straight black lips.” (Frankenstein by Mary Shelly, Page 35)  The creature’s traits, as described by Frankenstein in the quote, gives him a disturbing image that is not pleasant to the human eye. Frankenstein abandoned the creature because of this, and any contact the creature made, no matter how nice he was, is turned down because he has a different appearance. This shows why the creature has turned to a more darker side; the world will not accept who he is.

12 Works Cited   Frankenstein by Mary Shelley 


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