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By: Yonathan Andu, Sara Muwaqet,Colby Langan The definition of weddings, funerals, parties, and other social occasions are pretty much common sense.

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Presentation on theme: "By: Yonathan Andu, Sara Muwaqet,Colby Langan The definition of weddings, funerals, parties, and other social occasions are pretty much common sense."— Presentation transcript:

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2 By: Yonathan Andu, Sara Muwaqet,Colby Langan

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4 The definition of weddings, funerals, parties, and other social occasions are pretty much common sense but in literature they serve to show the reader the social customs, character relationships as well as insight on how he/she might be feeling. WEDDING – when two people get married FUNERAL – burial ceremony after someone dies PARTY – when people (specifically teenagers) get TURNT OTHER SCOIAL OCCASIONS – social occasions other than the ones previously listed

5 Although social occasions in Frankenstein are few and far between, when Marry Shelly does incorporate them, she uses them to convey a characters true feelings.

6 The first example of a social gathering is Justines execution. A crowd gathered to taunt her and wait for the guilty verdict while she pleaded her case so that they may watch her die for he alleged crime. Marry Shelly uses this moment to show Justines strength but allows bits of emotion to break through.

7 The second example of a social gathering was Victors wedding. Marry Shelly uses this to show Victors unease. Victor was surrounded by loved ones on what was supposed to be a joyous day but instead isolated himself, this time within his ominous thoughts of the monsters looming vengeance.

8 Justines death is significant to the story because afterwards, Victor is overwhelmed with guilt. He believes that because he created the monster that killed William, Justine was wrongfully convicted and didnt speak up for fear of being accused of insanity, he is just as guilty as the monster

9 Victor and Elizabeths wedding is significant because this is when the monster exacts his revenge. The monster kills Victors bride Elizabeth leaving Victor alone just as he did to the monster on several occasions.

10 Symbolism, irony, and external conflict are some of the many literary devices used in the book. Mary Shelley used symbolism, such as light, to symbolize enlightenment in Frankenstein." He envisions pouring a "torrent of light into our dark world" through the creation of a new species. Yet light that's too bright is also blinding, and both Victor and Walton fail to see or consider the dangerous consequences of their quests for enlightenment.

11 Irony, The monster in the novel is described as having monstrous physical features, "black lips", and ghastly grin, yellow eyes. However, Victor, ironically, is the one who shows to be a monster with such qualities. He abandons his "creation" cursing him as a "daemon" and "wretch", not taking into account the repercussions of his actions which lead to the death of the innocent Justine accused of killing William. He is the one who is a monster, and this is seen during the monster and Victor's first encounter in the mountains: the monster tries to approach in a calm and peaceful way but Victor reacts like a monster.

12 External conflict, the external conflict present in the story of Frankenstein is the love the monster seeks from the doctor and cannot receive because of the pain he has caused the doctor.

13 ony-in-frankenstein.html ony-in-frankenstein.html

14 BYE


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