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Today’s Agenda Any Announcements? Any Questions? Let's Review our Bellwork.... Now... Let’s Begin Today’s Lesson…..

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Presentation on theme: "Today’s Agenda Any Announcements? Any Questions? Let's Review our Bellwork.... Now... Let’s Begin Today’s Lesson….."— Presentation transcript:

1 Today’s Agenda Any Announcements? Any Questions? Let's Review our Bellwork.... Now... Let’s Begin Today’s Lesson…..

2 What was Mark Twain saying? “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.” - Mark Twain, The Innocents Abroad/Roughing It

3 Civil Rights Our Standards Today Standard 4.0: Governance and Civics 4.2 understand the role of constitutions in preventing abuses of government power. 4.5 understand the role of the United States legal system. Standard 5.0: History 5.3 understand the importance of the rule of laws and the sources, purposes, and function of law. 5.4 understand the United States Constitution as a "living document" in both principle and practice. Standard 6.0: Individuals Groups & Interactions 6.2 understand how groups can effect change at the local, state national and world levels. 6.6 understand the role of individual leaders who have affected policies, case laws, and legislation.

4 Our objectives today Today's Objectives The students will describe the 15 th amendment and the tactics used to circumvent it in an effort to deny African Americans the right to vote.

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6 Discrimination dis·crim·i·na·tion - noun 1. an act or instance of discriminating, or of making a distinction. 2. treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction in favor of or against, a person or thing based on the group, class, or category to which that person or thing belongs rather than on individual merit: racial and religious intolerance and discrimination. 3. the power of making fine distinctions; discriminating judgment: She chose the colors with great discrimination. 4. Archaic. something that serves to differentiate. Origin: 1640–50; < Latin discrīminātiōn- (stem of discrīminātiō ) a distinguishing. See discriminate, -ion (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/discrimination)

7 Jim Crow Laws and “Separate But Equal” I downloaded a couple of videos, one on “Jim Crow” laws and one on “Separate but Equal”

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13 Sundown Signs “Versions of Cullman’s (Alabama) old sundown sign hung beside county roads well into the 1970s, and all of them repeated the message that the travel writer Carl Carmer saw when he visited Cullman in the late 1920s:” “ Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on You in This Town.” “Race in the South in the Age of Obama” - New York Times

14 Prejudice prej·u·dice - noun 1. an unfavorable opinion or feeling formed beforehand or without knowledge, thought, or reason. 2. any preconceived opinion or feeling, either favorable or unfavorable. 3. unreasonable feelings, opinions, or attitudes, especially of a hostile nature, regarding a racial, religious, or national group. 4. such attitudes considered collectively: The war against prejudice is never- ending. 5. damage or injury; detriment: a law that operated to the prejudice of the majority. verb (used with object) 6. to affect with a prejudice, either favorable or unfavorable: His honesty and sincerity prejudiced us in his favor. (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/prejudice)

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17 Bigotry big·ot·ry - noun, plural big·ot·ries. 1. stubborn and complete intolerance of any creed, belief, or opinion that differs from one's own. 2. the actions, beliefs, prejudices, etc., of a bigot. Origin: 1665–75; bigot + -ry, formation parallel to French bigoterie Synonyms 1. narrow-mindedness, bias, discrimination. (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/bigotry)

18 Who is this man?

19 Is this a good hint?

20 Henry Ford The founder of the modern American automotive industry was also the 1920s king of American anti-Semitism. Henry Ford is best known for being the inventor of the assembly line method of manufacturing automobiles, but he was also an avid fan of “The Protocols of the Elders of Zion”, the famous Russian anti-Semitic forgery. He was so convinced of its authenticity that he published it in serial form in his newspaper, The Dearborn Independent. He later took the Independent’s Articles and published them as a book, “The International Jew: The World’s Foremost Problem”. In it, Ford blamed the Jews for everything from pornography to alcoholism to communism and beyond. The book proved to be rather popular, and was especially so in 1930s Germany; so much that Adolf Hitler himself awarded Ford a medal, and Ford is the only American mentioned in “Mein Kampf”.

21 What was this Story about?

22 Emmitt Till Emmett Louis "Bobo" Till (July 25, August 28, 1955) was an African-American teenager from Chicago, Illinois who died in what has been characterized as a "brutal murder" in a region of Mississippi known as the Mississippi Delta in the small town of Money in Leflore County. His murder was one of the key events that energized the nascent American Civil Rights Movement. The main suspects were acquitted but later admitted to committing the crime. Till's mother had an open casket funeral to let everyone see how her son had been brutally killed. He had been shot and beaten; he was then thrown into the Tallahatchie River with a 75-pound cotton gin fan tied to his neck with barbed wire as a weight. His body stayed in the river for three days until it was discovered and retrieved by two fishermen.

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25 Any UT Fans Here?

26 Condredge Holloway Condredge was the first black quarterback in the SEC He played from 1972 to 1974 at Tennessee. He was also the first black baseball player in UT history. He still owns UT's longest hitting streak at 27 games. He was selected to Tennessee's All-Century Baseball Team, making him the only UT student-athlete named to All-Century squads in both baseball and football. Where did he play high school baseball, football and basketball? What was his favorite team growing up?

27 1964 Civil Rights Act

28 Some People Did Not Want it to Pass At 7:40 on the evening of June 19, 1964, after the longest debate in its nearly 180-year history, the U.S. Senate passes the Civil Rights Act of The vote in favor of the bill is 73 to 27. Thirteen days later, on July 2, the U.S. House of Representatives passes the bill and President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the bill into law that same evening. Five hundred amendments were made to the bill and Congress has debated the bill for 534 hours. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 also creates the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)

29 Alabama Governor George Wallace blocks the doorway to Foster Auditorium – No Black Students are going to the University of Alabama.

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33 Segregation in Childrens' Books?

34 Children’s Books and Segregation in the Workplace by Steven Vallas PhD As children, many of us encountered Richard Scarry’s book, “What Do People Do all Day?” A classic kid’s book, it uses animals to represent the division of labor that exists in “Busytown.” The book is an example of a brilliant piece of analysis by sociologist John Levi Martin (full text). To oversimplify greatly: Martin analyzes nearly 300 children’s books and finds that there is a marked tendency for these texts to represent certain animals in particular kinds of jobs. Jobs that allow the occupant to exercise authority over others tend to be held by predatory animals (especially foxes), but never by “lower” animals (mice or pigs).

35 Do You See it Now?

36 Group Time.... Go to your groups in an orderly and timely manner. Anchors – You are your state's election commission chairman. Recorders – You are a legislator writing a law on your state's voting requirements. Captains – You are the governor of your state. Each State must develop their own voter registration laws and requirements. We will then share each state's laws and discuss and debate them.

37 What Did We Learn Today? On a separate sheet of paper, answer these questions for me to take up and review. 1) What is Discrimination? 2) What is Prejudice? 3) What is Bigotry? 4) What is the 15 th Amendment? 5) How did these terms impact African-Americans' right to vote after the 15th Amendment was enacted?

38 Civil Rights Our Standards Today Standard 4.0: Governance and Civics 4.2 understand the role of constitutions in preventing abuses of government power. 4.5 understand the role of the United States legal system. Standard 5.0: History 5.3 understand the importance of the rule of laws and the sources, purposes, and function of law. 5.4 understand the United States Constitution as a "living document" in both principle and practice. Standard 6.0: Individuals Groups & Interactions 6.2 understand how groups can effect change at the local, state national and world levels. 6.6 understand the role of individual leaders who have affected policies, case laws, and legislation.

39 Our objectives today Today's Objectives The students will describe the 15 th amendment and the tactics used to circumvent it in an effort to deny African Americans the right to vote.


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