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Integrating Quotations into Sentences.  It gives you more control over how your reader perceives the quotations  It allows your to focus your reader’s.

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Presentation on theme: "Integrating Quotations into Sentences.  It gives you more control over how your reader perceives the quotations  It allows your to focus your reader’s."— Presentation transcript:

1 Integrating Quotations into Sentences

2  It gives you more control over how your reader perceives the quotations  It allows your to focus your reader’s attention (as well as your own) on essential parts of text  It helps your paper to flow better Why Integrate Quotes?

3 Introducing Quotes  Before a quote, you should supply context.  Who?  What?  Where?  When?  You can also introduce a quote with a body point.  How does it help your argument?  Why is it worth focusing on?

4 Why Context is Important I had this dream and in my dream, I killed my mother! It was horrible! The soccer player is an evil man. He said, “I killed my mother!” (23). Without Context

5 Introducing… An example The Quote  “I had not intended to discuss this controversial subject at this particular time. However, I want you to know that I do not shun controversy.” Context  At a banquet when he was asked his position on prohibition, Representative “Soggy” Sweat Jr., responded that “I had not intended to discuss…” Where What Who

6 Introducing… An example, 2 The Quote  “I had not intended to discuss this controversial subject at this particular time. However, I want you to know that I do not shun controversy.” Body Point  Though Sweat begins his Whiskey speech as if he is unprepared—he tells his audience, “I had not intended to discuss this controversial subject at this particular time”—it is clear that his balanced and articulate oration is well-planned.

7  Speaker says, “Quote.” Speaker accuses, “Quote.” Speaker adds, “Quote.” Speaker apologizes, “Quote.” Speaker boasts, “Quote.” Speaker cautions, “Quote.” Speaker notes, “Quote.” Speaker interjects, “Quote.” Speaker contests, “Quote.” Speaker concedes, “Quote.” Speaker insists, “Quote.” Speaker observes, “Quote.” Speaker wonders, “Quote.” Speaker propounds, “Quote.” Speaker muses, “Quote.” Speaker explicates, “Quote.” Speaker protests, “Quote.” Speaker entreats, “Quote.” The Most Basic Lead-in For nearly 200 ways to say “says,” visit:

8 Integrate Quote into Sentence Quote  “They were intended to spread Protestantism and royalist propaganda through a divided realm” (Wood 105). In my Essay!  During the Elizabethan period, plays served a political purpose and “were intended to spread Protestantism and royalist propaganda through a divided realm” (Wood 105). Not full sentence!

9 Fancier Stuff! Incorporate a quote into your sentence, using an ellipsis so it flows:  “‘People say,’ said another, ‘that the Reverend Master Dimmesdale, her godly pastor, takes it very grievously to heart that such a scandal should have come upon his congregation.’”  Early foreshadowing, even in the gossiping of a villager who whispers, “People say… that the Reverend Master Dimmesdale, her godly pastor, takes it very grievously to heart that such a scandal should have come upon his congregation,” hints that Dimmesdale is invested in Hester’s plight.

10 Another Ellipsis Example  “Observe, I do not mean to suggest that the custom of lying has suffered any decay or interruption—no, for the Lie, as a Virtue, A Principle, is eternal; the Lie, as a recreation, a solace, a refuge in time of need, the fourth Grace, the tenth Muse, man's best and surest friend, is immortal, and cannot perish from the earth while this club remains.”  It is clear early on that Twain supports an acceptance of lying, when he affirms, “I do not mean to suggest that the custom of lying has suffered any decay or interruption—no, for the Lie… is immortal.”

11 List Key Words or Phrases  “If when you say whiskey you mean the devil's brew, the poison scourge, the bloody monster, that defiles innocence, dethrones reason, destroys the home, creates misery and poverty…”  The cacophonous sound created by the alliterative “defiles,” “dethrones,” and “destroys” echoes the harsh consequences of whiskey and aids Sweat in demonizing the drink.

12 Listing Key Words or Phrases  “If you mean the evil drink that topples the Christian man and woman from the pinnacle of righteous, gracious living into the bottomless pit of degradation, and despair, and shame and helplessness, and hopelessness, then certainly I am against it.”  Sweat creates a false dichotomy, where religion and alcohol are necessarily at odds with one another, creating an antithesis between “the Christian man and woman” and the “evil drink,” and between their “pinnacle of righteous, gracious living” and the “bottomless pit of degradation” that alcohol threatens.

13 Bridging between Parts of Quote  “The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman.”  Paine contrasts the weak- hearted “summer soldier” and the ineffective “sunshine patriot” with the courageous soldier that continues fighting in harsh conditions and “deserves the love and thanks of man and woman” to shame his audience into practicing fortitude, even in cold and dark times, so that they too deserve gratitude.

14 Last Example  “I see them as part of a pattern: just two of many ads that state or imply that products, are more important than people. Ads have long promised us a better relationship via a product: buy this and you will be loved. But more recently they have gone beyond that proposition to promise us a relationship with the product itself: buy this and it will love you. The product is not so much the means to an end, as the end itself.”  Kilbourne’s chief argument that advertisements make objects “the end itself” points to the damaging consequences of contemporary consumerism; ads’ implied or stated promise to consumers that inanimate objects “will love you” indicates that consumers are beginning to endow material goods with qualities beyond their scope. SKIP!

15 Last Example  “It isn't just the commuters, whom we have come to visualize as a supine breed who have got on to the trick of suspending their sensory faculties twice a day while they submit to the creeping dissolution of the railroad industry. It isn't just they who have given up trying to rectify irrational vexations. It is the American people everywhere.”  By beginning with the anecdote about train passengers, whom he describes as a “supine breed” willing to “submit to the creeping dissolution of the railroad industry,” Buckley offers a concrete example to represent what he claims is the attitude of “American people everywhere:” an attitude which slothfully and apathetically accepts discomfort and failure.

16  “That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me any best place! And ain't I a woman? Look at me! Look at my arm! I have ploughed and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me! And ain't I a woman? I could work as much and eat as much as a man - when I could get it - and bear the lash as well! And ain't I a woman? I have borne thirteen children, and seen most all sold off to slavery, and when I cried out with my mother's grief, none but Jesus heard me! And ain't I a woman?” Your Turn!

17  “For the ancient Greeks, drama taught and reinforced compassion within a society, The object of Greek tragedy was to inspire empathy in the audience so that the common response to the hero's fall was: "There, but for the grace of God, go I." Could it be that this was the response of the mother who offered the dollar, the French woman who gave the food? Could it be that the homeless, like those ancients, are reminding us of our common humanity? Of course, there is a difference. This play doesn't end and the players can't go home.” Again!

18  “In the world of advertising, lovers grow cold, spouses grow old, children grow up and away--but possessions stay with us and never change. Seeking the outcomes of a healthy relationship through products cannot work. Sometimes it leads us into addiction. But at best the possessions can never deliver the promised goods. They can't make us happy or loved or less alone or safe. If we believe they can, we are doomed to disappointment. No matter how much we love them, they will never love us back.” Again! SKIP!

19  “Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider. Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. Some books also may be read by deputy, and extracts made of them by others; but that would be only in the less important arguments, and the meaner sort of books, else distilled books are like common distilled waters, flashy things. Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man.” Last Time!


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