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Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Historic Sites Campaign Webinar.

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Presentation on theme: "Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Historic Sites Campaign Webinar."— Presentation transcript:

1 Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Historic Sites Campaign Webinar

2 Webinar Agenda 1. What is the AAPI Heritage Initiative, and how can you get involved? – Isra Pananon, Chief of Staff to the Assistant Secretary for Fish, Wildlife, and Parks 2. An inside look at historic preservation – Kathy Ko Chin, WHIAAPI Commissioner 3. How to nominate a site to the National Historic Register or as a National Historic Landmark – Jamie Jacobs, Acting Branch Chief, National Historic Landmarks Program 4. Capturing intangible history with “East at Main St: APIA Mapping Project” – Michelle Magalong, Asian Pacific Islander Americans in Historic Preservation 5. Questions from the audience 6. Wrap up and next steps

3 What is the AAPI Heritage Initiative, and how can you get involved? -AAPI Heritage Initiative - Secretary Salazar announced in Feb Significance to AAPI communities -Includes 3 components: theme study (led by Dr. Franklin Odo), capturing intangible history, historic site nominations (focus of webinar) -Ways to get involved: -Share intangible history resources (i.e. AAPIs in Civil War book, East at Main St: APIA Mapping Project)AAPIs in Civil War book -Nominate historic sites for state, local or federal recognition – can be a community organization, university, community member -Or consider informal ways to recommend sites of interest (i.e. East at Main St mapping project, NPS Public Comment Site)

4 An inside look at historic preservation Angel Island Immigration Station: National Register of Historic Places & National Historic Landmark Kathy Ko Chin, President’s Advisory Commission on AAPIs

5 Heart MountainGeorge Nakashima Complex Listing and Designation Programs in the National Park Service Introduction to the National Register of Historic Places and the National Historic Landmarks Program

6  National Park Service  State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPOs)  Communities  Universities  Consultants Historic Preservation Stakeholders & Roles

7  Conservation  Comprehensive documentation  Interpretation  Mitigation  Listing and Designation Reasons for Cultural Resource Documentation

8 HISTORIC SITES ACT OF 1935 TITLE 16 ‐ -CONSERVATION CHAPTER 1A ‐‐ HISTORIC SITES, BUILDINGS, OBJECTS, AND ANTIQUITIES SUBCHAPTER I ‐‐ GENERAL PROVISIONS Sec Declaration of national policy It is declared that it is a national policy to preserve for public use historic sites, buildings, and objects of national significance for the inspiration and benefit of the people of the United States.

9 National Park Units ~~ National Historic Landmarks ~~ National Register of Historic Places 405 Over 90,000 listings representing over 1.7 million properties 2,551

10 National Register of Historic Places History that has meaning either to the local community, to the residents of a specific state, or to the citizens of the nation as a whole. National Historic Landmarks History that has importance to the nation as a whole. This house is one of 429 making up the Dominion Hills district in Arlington County, Virginia ( ), a merchant-built subdivision having local significance. (EHT Traceries, Inc.) This house is one of 320 contributing resources in Radburn, New Jersey, which holds national significance as an influential planned suburb whose core was completed between 1928 and (NHL)

11 The Purpose of NR and NHL Documentation Clarifies why a property is significant and at what level it is significant and the degree to which it maintains integrity, therefore making it eligible for National Historic Landmark designation or listing in the National Register of Historic Places. NHL documentation also must provide comparisons with other related properties to explain why the property being considered has the strongest and best association with the event, historic pattern, or individual in question Provides benchmark information that can be used to protect the property in the future.

12 Criterion 1 (NHL) or A (NR): Events or Broad Patterns in American History Criterion 2 (NHL) or B (NR): Individuals Criterion 3: American Ideals Criterion 4 (NHL) or C (NR): Architecture, Design, Engineering Criterion 5: A Compendium (District) Criterion 6 (NHL) or D (NR): Archeology NHL & NR Criteria: a nomination demonstrates a property’s significance using the following criteria:

13 National Register of Historic Places Properties listed in the National Register have to maintain “enough” integrity relative to their level of significance. National Historic Landmarks A property designated as a National Historic Landmark must maintain a high level of integrity. Walter French Junior High School, Lansing, MichiganCentral High School, Little Rock, Arkansas

14 Integrity refers to the property’s retention of its historic fabric. A property with a high level of integrity is one that does not appear to be significantly changed from its condition when the historical events at the property occurred (during its period of significance). The NHL and NR programs recognize seven aspects of integrity for above-ground resources: Location Design Setting Materials Workmanship Feeling Association

15 How does a property get listed in the National Register? With the consent of the property owner, an interested individual works with the National Register Coordinator of the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) to write a National Register nomination. The nomination is reviewed by the State Review Board (composed of experts in history, preservation, architectural history, archeology, etc.). Following approval by the State Review Board, the nomination is forwarded to the Washington, DC office of the NPS for review. The NPS has 45 days to review the nomination. A Control Unit performs a technical review. If the nomination is flagged for review or if the property is listed at the national level, the nomination is sent to a NR reviewer for a substantive review. –If there are no issues for review, the nomination is listed in the NR. The nomination may be rejected, returned to the state for corrections, or listed with corrections within the 45 day listing period.

16 How does a property become a National Historic Landmark? A State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO), a Tribal Historic Preservation Officer (THPO), a Federal Preservation Officer (FPO), a Regional Office of the National Park Service, a scholar or an interested member of the general public writes a letter of inquiry to the National Park Service. NHL staff in both Washington, DC and NPS Regional Offices review the letter to determine if the site appears to meet the criteria for an NHL. If the site has the potential to become an NHL, the staff provides the preparer with detailed guidance as the nomination is written. Working with the preparer, staff from the National Historic Landmarks program in Washington DC and NPS Regional Offices edit and review the nomination. Subject matter experts and scholars from across the nation review the nomination. Their suggestions and assessments are incorporated into the nomination. The Landmarks Committee reviews the nomination before making a recommendation to the National Park System Advisory Board. The National Park System Advisory Board reviews the nomination before making a recommendation to the Secretary of the Interior. The nomination is submitted to the Secretary of the Interior. The Secretary considers the recommendations and decides whether or not to designate the property as a National Historic Landmark.

17 How long does it take for a property to be listed in the NR or be designated a NHL, and what are the estimated costs? National Register: Varies from state to state, but generally less than a year. $3,000 - $7,000 value of time and/or consulting fees to prepare nomination. National Historic Landmarks: Typically, one to three years. $15,000 - $35,000 value of time and/or consulting fees.

18 NPS Grant Opportunities Japanese Confinement Sites Grants –Awarded to preserve and interpret U.S. Confinement Sites where Japanese Americans were detained during World War II. Grants awarded through a competitive process and require matching ($2 Federal to $1 non-Federal match). Minimum grant request is $5,000. –http://www.nps.gov/JACS/application.htmlhttp://www.nps.gov/JACS/application.html Underrepresented Community Grants –Goal is to increase the number of National Register listings associated with communities currently underrepresented, including African American, Latino, AAPI and LGBT communities. –Grants can support surveys and inventories of historic properties, as well as the development of National Register nominations. –2014 grants include AAPI preservation work in Massachusetts & Utah –http://www.nps.gov/preservation-grants/community-grants.htmlhttp://www.nps.gov/preservation-grants/community-grants.html

19 Heritage Initiatives

20 Heart Mountain George Nakashima Complex James A. (Jamie) Jacobs, Ph.D. Acting Branch Chief, NHL Program National Register of Historic Places National Historic Landmarks Program

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25 Final Thoughts & Next Steps Recap of ways to get involved: Share intangible history resources (i.e. AAPIs in Civil War book, East at Main St: APIA Mapping Project)AAPIs in Civil War book Nominate historic sites for state, local or federal recognition – can be a community organization, university, community member Universities and AANAPISIs can partner with community organizationsAANAPISIs If you can’t commit to a formal nomination right now, consider informal ways to recommend sites of interest (i.e. East at Main St mapping project, NPS Public Comment Site) Timeline & Milestones Theme study to be completed in early 2016 Next funding period for Underrepresented Community Grant applications expected to open in April 2015

26 Additional Resources National Park Service AAPI Heritage Initiative and Civil War book –http://www.nps.gov/history/AAPI/http://www.nps.gov/history/AAPI/ –http://www.eparks.com/store/product/118828/Asians-and-Pacific-Islanders-and-the- Civil-War/http://www.eparks.com/store/product/118828/Asians-and-Pacific-Islanders-and-the- Civil-War/ National Park Service Public Comment Site (for informal recommendations of potential AAPI-related historic sites) –https://parkplanning.nps.gov/commentForm.cfm?documentID=64642https://parkplanning.nps.gov/commentForm.cfm?documentID=64642 –http://parkplanning.nps.gov/document.cfm?documentID=64642http://parkplanning.nps.gov/document.cfm?documentID=64642 List of State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPOs) –http://www.nps.gov/nr/shpolist.htmhttp://www.nps.gov/nr/shpolist.htm Sample National Register site nominations –http://www.nps.gov/nr/sample_nominations.htmhttp://www.nps.gov/nr/sample_nominations.htm Historic Preservation Links –http://www.nps.gov/nr/preservation_links.htm#notnpshttp://www.nps.gov/nr/preservation_links.htm#notnps For other questions related to the AAPI Heritage Initiative, contact Theodora Chang at the National Park Service: / (202)


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