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Welcome to the System for Universal Media Searching (SUMS). Guided Introduction to SUMS Today’s search engines typically reduce Internet access to a single.

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1 Welcome to the System for Universal Media Searching (SUMS). Guided Introduction to SUMS Today’s search engines typically reduce Internet access to a single query box. For complex searches more is needed. SUMS offers a new approach. Welcome to the System for Universal Media Searching (SUMS). Guided Introduction to SUMS Today’s search engines typically reduce Internet access to a single query box. For complex searches more is needed. SUMS offers a new approach. 1. Guided Strategy 2. Guide for Direct strategy 2.1. WHO explanation (example 1) 2.2. WHO explanation (example 2) 3. Guide for Personal Terms strategy 2.2. WHAT explanation 4. Guide for Database Field Terms strategy 5. Guide for Subject Headings strategy 6. Guide for Standard Classification strategy 7. Guide for Multiple Classification strategy

2 Who? What? Where? When? How? Why? AuthorsTitles Places Dates Introductions Reasons See path Up - back Topic Choices Levels Refresh SUMS System for Universal Media Searching Click Choices Guided Introduction to SUMS Welcome to the System for Universal Media Searching (SUMS). Today’s search engines typically reduce Internet access to a single query box. For complex searches more is needed. SUMS offers a new approach. Guided Introduction to SUMS Welcome to the System for Universal Media Searching (SUMS). Today’s search engines typically reduce Internet access to a single query box. For complex searches more is needed. SUMS offers a new approach. Start introduction >> 1. Goals Knowing why one is searching helps determine what one needs to find. ` The question Why gives limits to How, When, Where and especially Who and What. Click Access When entering SUMS step one is to choose one of ten Goals. Click Goal Suppose we choose Goal=Everyday In the larger SUMS vision there are 10 goals: Everyday, Emergency, Business, Education, Environment, Government, Health, Legal, Leisure, Religion Click Everyday Click Guided Choice Step two is to choose the Strategy level. Suppose we choose Goal=Everyday and Strategy=Guided. In this case SUMS reverses the typical order of the six questions. Goal=Everyday corresponds to a first part of Why? To make this more precise SUMS asks Everyday with respect to what? What? Suppose we choose News Next the Guided version asks How: Internet born, Newspaper, TV? Click News SUMS 1. Sources 2. Literature 3. Primary Literature 4. Secondary Literature 5. Both 6. Earlier Bibliographies CHOICE 1. Access 2. Learning 3. Levels 4. Media 5. Quality 6. Quantity 7. Questions 8. Space 9. Leisure 10. Time 11. Tools ACCESS 1. Goal 2. Strategy 3. Visualisation GOAL 1. Everyday 2. Emergency 3. Business 4. Education 5. Enviroment 6. Goverment 7. Health 8. Legal 9. Leisure 10. Religion SEARCH STRATEGY 1. Guided Choice 2. Direct 3. Personal Terms 4. Database Field Terms 5. Subject Headings 6. Standard Classification 7. Multiple Classification 8. Comparative Ontologies EVERYDAY 1. Classifiels, Shopping 2. News 3. Sports 4. Traffic 5. Weather NEWS 1. Internet 2. Newspapers 3. Radio 4. Television NEWSPAPERS 1. Daily 2. Weekly Click Newspapers How? Suppose we choose Newspapers DAILY 1. Local 2. Regional 3. National 4. International When? Suppose we say Daily. Click Daily SUMS then asks When?, namely Daily or Weekly? Where? Suppose we say local. Click Local SUMS then asks Where?, namely National, Regional or Local? Our demo gives a hard-wired example for Local=Toronto. LOCAL 1. Globe 2. Star 3. Sun Click Globe 1. Goals In the full-blown system the computer will “know” where it is and adjust accordingly. SUMS is like a Dewey decimal system using questions. Note that by limiting these choices to 10 at a time it can be used on mobile devices. In future a mobile device can also serve as a remote control for larger displays. The main part of this demo focuses on Goal 4: Education (and Learning) Clicking on this gives a list of topics: Perspective, Leonardo, New Media, E-Culture and New Methods. Clicking on Perspective we need to choose a Strategy. SUMS has 7 strategies. We are now in the introductory guided strategy. This has the same functions as the Direct Strategy except that it has guided text. Strategies 1 and 2 focus on a single term using the local database. Continue introduction (Guide for Direct Strategy) >> [Main menu][Exit]

3 See path Up - back Topic Choices Levels Refresh Who? What? Where? When? How? Why? AuthorsTitles Places Dates Introductions Reasons 2. Direct Strategy SUMS uses a series of choices as users enter more deeply into knowledge. Simple lists of up to 10 choices appear in the little box at the bottom right hand. Larger lists appear in a left hand column, which the smaller choices then help to limit. This guided demo uses the Topic: Perspective. SEARCH STRATEGY 1. Guided Choice 2. Direct 3. Personal Terms 4. Database Field Terms 5. Subject Headings 6. Standard Classification 7. Multiple Classification 8. Comparative Ontologies In this opening screen the small list of choices is like a table of contents in a book. Placing the mouse over each of these will bring up a brief explanation of these. SUMS 1. Sources 2. Literature 3. Primary Literature 4. Secondary Literature 5. Both 6. Earlier Bibliographies SUMS 1. Sources 2. Literature 3. Primary Literature 4. Secondary Literature 5. Both 6. Earlier Bibliographies SUMS 1. Sources 2. Literature 3. Primary Literature 4. Secondary Literature 5. Both 6. Earlier Bibliographies SUMS 1. Sources 2. Literature 3. Primary Literature 4. Secondary Literature 5. Both 6. Earlier Bibliographies SUMS 1. Sources 2. Literature 3. Primary Literature 4. Secondary Literature 5. Both 6. Earlier Bibliographies SUMS 1. Sources 2. Literature 3. Primary Literature 4. Secondary Literature 5. Both 6. Earlier Bibliographies SUMS 1. Sources 2. Literature 3. Primary Literature 4. Secondary Literature 5. Both 6. Earlier Bibliographies In the upper portion of the screen are six basic questions. Placing the mouse over each of these will bring up a brief explanation of these. Who? What? Where? When? How? Why? SUMS 1. Sources 2. Literature 3. Primary Literature 4. Secondary Literature 5. Both 6. Earlier Bibliographies Continue introduction (WHO explanation. Example 1.) >> 1. Sources of Perspective is a monograph that surveys all primary literature. You can download by chapter if your connection is slow. You can download the whole book if you have a fast connection. This text will eventually be hyperlinked with the bibliography. 2. Literature on Perspective is a monograph that surveys all secondary literature. This follows the same principles as Sources. 3. Bibliography of Primary Literature This limits the bibliography to primary sources: i.e. books on theory and practice. 4. Bibliography of Secondary Literature On the introductory page this lends to a Full list of primary literature in the printed version. This limits the bibliography to secondary sources: i.e. literature about perspective 5. Both On the introductory page this lends to a Full list of secondary literature in the printed version. This allows one to search for both primary and secondary sources together. This is the default mode. 6. Earlier Bibliographies This leads to a chronological list of all the earlier bibliographies. Clicking on each of these reveals their titles Who Clicking on How gives a list of authors and practitioners of perspective. Clicking on letters of the alphabet below the list takes one to names with that letter. Typing a name or variant name takes you directly to that person. What Clicking on What gives an alphabetical list of publications Clicking on letters of the alphabet below the list takes one to titles with that letter. Typing a name or variant name takes you directly to that title. Where Clicking on Where gives a list of cities and publications Clicking on letters of the alphabet below takes one to cities with that letter Typing a city takes you directly to that city. When Clicking on When give a list of dates Clicking on partial dates below takes one to the century in question Typing a date takes you directly to all titles under that date How Clicking on How brings up a choice between: At beginning and Anywhere in Title Why Clicking on Why brings up titles with the Word Why The little box offers further choices re: why related terms: origins, causes, etc.. [Main menu][Exit]

4 Who? What? Where? When? How? Why? AuthorsTitles Places Dates Introductions Reasons See path Up - back Topic Choices Levels Refresh SEARCH STRATEGY 1. Guided Choice 2. Direct 3. Personal Terms 4. Database Field Terms 5. Subject Headings 6. Standard Classification 7. Multiple Classification 8. Comparative Ontologies 2. Direct Strategy (WHO?) This initial screen leads to many more choices, which arise as one proceeds. Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Leo Noster Let’s type Leo Noster Then click Enter Leon Battista Alberti Leon Battista Alberti ( ) Author Variants: Alberti, Leon Alberti, Leon Battisti Albertus noster Baptista[e] Leo Noster Alberti is best known for the first extant treatise on perspective, On Painting (De pictura, 1434), translated into Italian as Della pittura (1435). Seven Latin and two Italian manuscripts are known. Alberti also wrote Elementa picturae of which there are six extant manuscripts. Some authors (e.g. Bonucci) have attributed to Alberti the manuscript Della prospettiva (Florence, Biblioteca Riccardiana, n. 2110). Vagnetti (1979) mentioned a lost Trattato di prospettiva. Some of the literature has been biographical and has only touched on Alberti's technical writings. The first to do so was Vasari (1568) who mentioned that Alberti developed a perspective instrument in Loria (1895), Michel (1930, , ), Galantic (1969). Gilbert ( ) considered Alberti's theoretical stance and explored its models in Antiquity. Borsi (1975) provided a useful bibliography. Many recent articles have been general and will not be mentioned here. Much of the literature on Alberti's perspective relates to whether he used the legitimate construction or the distance point construction. Muratori's (1751) edition of an anonymous Life of L. B. Alberti, which was also one of the first serious attempts at a biography, mentioned Alberti's experiments with perspective boxes. Janitschek (1877, ) in his edition of On Painting claimed that Alberti had known the distane point. Wiener (1884, I, 12) in his Textbook of descriptive geometry accepted this. The introductory screen for Alberti gives his dates and a survey of the literature on him. WHO: Leon Battista Alberti 1. Books 2. Literature Click Books BOOKS: Leon Battista Alberti 1. All Books 2. Standard Titles 3. Variant Titles 4. Languages 5. Manuscripts 6. Locations 7. Literature Click Standart Titles Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Leon Battista Alberti ( ) TitleYear Books Architettura Della prospettiva Kleinere kunstheoretische Schriften Opera completa Opera inedita et pauca separatim impressa Opere volgari per la piu parte inedite Opuscoli morali 1568 – Manuscripts De pictura 14__ - Elementa picturae 14__ - Trattato di prospettiva 14__? - Click De pictura Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Leon Battista Alberti ( ) Author: Leon Battista Alberti Title: De pictura Location: Rome, Bibliotheca Apostolica Vaticana Codex Ottoboniani latini 1424, fol. 1r-25v PubYear: 14__ Notes: Alberti probably wrote De pictura in 1434 followed by a translation into Italian as Della pittura in Cf. Spencer, 1956, 33. Some claim that the work was written between E.g. Some associate this also with a Della prospettiva which is attributed to Alberti. BOOK: 1. All books 2. Standard Title 3. Manuscripts 4. Editions 5. Translations 6. Variant Titles 7. Partial Contents 8. Full Contents 9. Bibliographies Click Editions YearEdition Location 1511 Nürnberg Latin 1540 Basel Latin Venice Italian 1565 Monte Regale Italian 1568 Venice Italian 1649 Amsterdam Latin 1651 Paris Italian 1733 Naples Italian Language Click 1540 Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Leon Battista Alberti ( ) Author: Leon Battista Alberti Title: De pictura praestantissima, et nunquam satis laudata arte libri tres absolutissimi PubPlace: Basel Publisher: Bartholomaeus Westheimer [] PubYear: 1540 Edition: 1 Location: NUC 7 232, Rome Bibl. naz. Notes: The 1540 is generally recognized as the editio princeps although there may have been an earlier edition in Click Bibliographies Year Person 1778 J.E. Scheibel Zehntes Stück. Erster Abschnitt. Vierte chronologische mathe Friedrich Wilhelm August Murhard Biblioteca mathematica. Tomus V Continens scripta de scienti Hermann Schüling Theorien der malerischen Linear-Perspektive vor Luigi Vagnetti De naturali et artificiali perspettiva: bibliografia ragiona Kim Veltman Bibliography of the sources and literature of perspective Title Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Leon Battista Alberti ( ) TitleYear Le vite de 'piu eccellenti pittori, scultori, e architettori, scritte da G. Vasari, con … Rerum italicarum scriptores Lehrbuch der darstellenden Geometrie Leon Battista Alberti, Kleinere kunsttheoretische Schriften Per Leon Battista Alberti Das perspektivische Verfahren Leone Battista Albertis Un idéal humain au XVe siècle: La pensée de Leon Battista Alberti The rationalization of sight Studi su Leon Battista Alberti L.B. Alberti's costruzione legittina Studi su la dolce prospettiva Alberti's optics Alberti's perspective: a new discovery and a new evaluation Sul significato degli Elementi di pittura di L. B. Alberti (1968) - The text of Alberti's De pictura La descriptio urbis Romae di L. B. Alberti The sources of Leon Battista Alberti's theory of painting Alberti's color theory: a mediaeval bottle without renaissance wine On Alberti's treatises on art and their chronological relationship Il modo optimo dell'Alberti per la costruzione prospettica Lo studio di Roma negli scritti albertiani Nuovi ricerche sugli Elementa picturae BOOK: 1. All books 2. Standard Title 3. Manuscripts 4. Editions 5. Translations 6. Variant Titles 7. Partial Contents 8. Full Contents 9. Bibliographies 10. Web-site Click 1568 Click Web-site Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Web-site Click Life of Alberti Click Refresh SUMS 1. Sources 2. Literature 3. Primary Literature 4. Secondary Literature 5. Both 6. Earlier Bibliographies Continue introduction (WHO explanation. Example 2.) >> The little box gives two choices: Books and Literature. Clicking on Books gives us a choice. Clicking on Standard Titles gives all perspective books by Alberti as Standard Titles If we choose De pictura we get details re: this standard title The little box then offers a number of other alternatives. Clicking on Editions lists known editions etc. If we choose editions and then 1540 we get details about the official first edition Clicking on Bibliographies we see which bibliographies are cited this edition Clicking on Literature either from the initial page leads to secondary literature Clicking on 1568 Vite by Vasari leads again to a new choice web Site. Clicking on this leads to full contents of Vasari’s Life of Alberti. When we wish to make a new set of queries we press the Refresh button and/or Home. The path button allows us to recall where we are. Pressing any point on this path takes us back to that level. Click See path… The path button allows us to recall where we are. Pressing any point on this path takes us back to that level. Click See path… PATH HISTORY Topic: Perspective Goal: Education Strategy: Direct Level: Titles Who? What? Where? When? How? Why? [Main menu][Exit]

5 Who? What? Where? When? How? Why? AuthorsTitles Places Dates Introductions Reasons See path Up - back Topic Choices Levels Refresh 2. Direct Strategy (WHO?). Example 2 As a second example of Who we choose Leonardo da Vinci. Leonardo da Vinci Let’s type Leonardo da Vinci Then click Enter SUMS 1. Sources 2. Literature 3. Primary Literature 4. Secondary Literature 5. Both 6. Earlier Bibliographies Leonardo da Vinci ( ) Artist, Author Variants: Da Vinci, Leonardo Léonard de Vinci Lionardo da Vinci Vinci, Leonardo da Leonardo da Vinci was the author of various manuscripts with notes on perspective. Chief among those extant were the Manuscripts A, E, G (now Paris, c.1492), the Codice Atlantico (Milan) and the Trattato della pittura. Cellini in his Trattati dell'Orifieria referred to a manuscript which among other things contained "a discourse on perspective, the most beautiful which was ever found by anyone in the world". Comolli (1791, ) referred to a Libro delle ombre e dei lumi which is no longer extant. In terms of practice he is most famous for his Last Supper (Milan, Santa Maria delle Grazie, ). Cited by Pélerin (1521, 1r) and Caporali (1536), mentioned by Vasari (II, , 160, 163, 165, IV, 28), Danti (1583, preface), Lomazzo (1585,336, ; 1590, 17,52,149), Comolli (1791, ) and Poudra (1864,I,126), modern study began with Jordan (1873), Ravaisson Mollien's edition of the manuscripts at the Institut de France (1891), Ludwig's edition of the Treatise on Painting (1882) and Richter's anthology (1883). Nielsen (1897) devoted a first monograph to Leonardo's perspective in the context of Raphael, Bramante and Giulio Romano. Mesnil (1922) emphasized scientific aspects of his perspective. Ivins (1938) drew attention to Leonardo's diagram for the legitimate construction. Bassoli (1938) drew attention to CA 35va and claimed that Leonardo had invented anamorphosis. The following year Bassoli (1939) drew attention to CA i bis va with its perspectival window. Clicking on his name we now have choices between Art and Books WHO: Leonardo da Vinci 1. Art 2. Books Clicking on books gives a new choice. Click Books WHO: Leonardo da Vinci 1. All Books 2. Standard Titles 3. Variant Titles 4. Languages 5. Manuscripts 6. Locations 7. Literature Clicking on manuscripts gives a list of his manuscripts. Click Manuscripts Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Leonardo da Vinci ( ) TitleYear Manuscripts Ashmolean, Sheet - Collection, Henry, Prince of Netherlands, Sheet - Uffizi, Sheets Windsor Castle, Sheets [1478] - [1518] Bonnat Bequest, Sheets [1479] - [1494] Un libro scritto in penna....In fra le altre mirabili cose, ch'erano in... [1480]? - [1519]? Codice atlantico 1480? ? Codex Ashburnham 361 (1480) - Codex Urbinas 1270 (Trattato della pittura) [1480] - [1516] Louvre, Sheets Codex Atlanticus [1483] - [1518] Codex Vallardi [1483] - Ecole des Beaux Arts, Sheet Christ Church, Sheets [1485] - [1504] Codex Forster I [1487] - [1505] Codex Trivulzianus [1487] - [1490] Collection, Stefan Zweig, Sheet [1487] - [1490] Manuscript B Manuscript C Pinakothek, Sheet [1490] - [1492] Codex Leicester (Hammer, Gates) [1504] - [1506] Clicking on the Codex Leicester (Hammer, Gates) gives us choices concerning this. Click Codex Leicester BOOK: 1. All books 2. Standard Title 3. Manuscripts 4. Editions 5. Translations 6. Variant Titles 7. Partial Contents 8. Full Contents 9. Bibliographies Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Leonardo da Vinci ( ) Author:Leonardo da Vinci Title:Codex Leicester (Hammer, Gates) Location:William H. Gates III Collection, Redwood PubYear:[1504] - [1506] Notes:36 folios (28.5x 21.8 cm) Clicking on partial contents gives an outline of each page. Click Partial Contents Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. FolioKeywords 1 r Water, Astronomy 1 v Water, Astronomy 2 r Water, Astronomy 2 v Water 3 r Water 3 v Water 4 r Air (Perspective) 4 v Water 5 r Water, Astronomy 5 v Water 6 r Water 6 v Water 7 r Water, Astronomy 7 v Water 8 r Water Clicking on full contents gives a facsimile of each page. Click Full Contents Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Leonardo da Vinci ( ) Author:Leonardo da Vinci Title:Codex Leicester (Hammer, Gates) Location:William H. Gates III Collection, Redwood PubYear:[1504] - [1506] Folios:1r - Water, Astronomy 1 r 1 V 2 r 2 v 3 r 3 v 4 r 4 v 5 r 5 v Going back a level we again see the list of his manuscripts. Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Leonardo da Vinci ( ) TitleYear Manuscripts Ashmolean, Sheet - Collection, Henry, Prince of Netherlands, Sheet - Uffizi, Sheets Windsor Castle, Sheets [1478] - [1518] Bonnat Bequest, Sheets [1479] - [1494] Un libro scritto in penna....In fra le altre mirabili cose, ch'erano in... [1480]? - [1519]? Codice atlantico 1480? ? Codex Ashburnham 361 (1480) - Codex Urbinas 1270 (Trattato della pittura) [1480] - [1516] Louvre, Sheets Codex Atlanticus [1483] - [1518] Codex Vallardi [1483] - Ecole des Beaux Arts, Sheet Christ Church, Sheets [1485] - [1504] Codex Arundel 263 [1504] - [1516] Codex Trivulzianus [1487] - [1490] Collection, Stefan Zweig, Sheet [1487] - [1490] Manuscript B Manuscript C Pinakothek, Sheet [1490] - [1492] Manuscript A Clicking on the Codex Arundel 263 offers the same functions for that text. Click Codex Arundel 263 Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Leonardo da Vinci ( ) Author:Leonardo da Vinci Title:Codex Arundel 263 Location:British Library, London PubYear:[1504] - [1516] Notes:283 folios (22 x 15 cm.) Click Full Contents Clicking on full contents brings a new choice: Direct link.. BOOK: 1. Terms 2. Definitions 3. Explanations 4. Titles 5. Partial Contents 6. Full Contents 7. Internal Analyses 8. External Analyses 9. Restorations 10. Reconstructions 11. Direct Link Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Leonardo da Vinci ( ) Author:Leonardo da Vinci Title:Codex Arundel 263 Location:British Library, London PubYear:[1504] - [1516] Folios:1r - Notes (Perspective), Mechanics (Weights) 1 r 1 V 2 r 2 v 3 r 3 v 4 r 4 v 5 r 5 v No Image available Clicking on direct link takes us to the British Library’s turning the pages project. An analogous functionality is available for the Codex Atlanticus at the Ambrosiana. Continue introduction (WHAT explanation.) >> Who? What? Where? When? How? Why? [Main menu][Exit]

6 Who? What? Where? When? How? Why? AuthorsTitles Places Dates Introductions Reasons See path Up - back Topic Choices Levels Refresh A fest SUMS 1. Sources 2. Literature 3. Primary Literature 4. Secondary Literature 5. Both 6. Earlier Bibliographies Who? What? Where? When? How? Why? 2.3. Guide for Direct Strategy (WHAT?) SUMS allows us access via many paths. For instance, suppose we know there is a title beginning: A fest Typing this in under What leads to an Hungarian edition of Alberti. Let’s type A fest Then click Enter BOOK: 1. All books 2. Standard Title 3. Manuscripts 4. Editions 5. Translations 6. Variant Titles 7. Partial Contents 8. Full Contents 9. Bibliographies Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Leon Battista Alberti ( ) Author: Title:A festészetrõl PubPlace:Budapest Publisher:Balassi PubYear:1997 Format:8 Edition:1 Location:Budapest Notes:ISBN Leon Battista Alberti Clicking on Standard title reveals that this is De pictura in an Hungarian translation. Click Standard Title Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Leon Battista Alberti ( ) TitleYear 1997 A festészetrõl 1868 De la statue et de la peinture 1970 De pictura 1972 De pictura praestantissima 1540 De pictura praestantissima, et nunquam satis laudata arte libri tres absolutissi De pictura:...Vitruvius Pollionis de architectura libri decem Della pittura 1804 Della pittura e della statua 1803 Della pittura [] 1651 Della pittura. Della statua 1964 Della prospettiva 2000 Die Malkunst Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Author: Leon Battista Alberti Title: De pictura Location: Rome, Bibliotheca Apostolica Vaticana Codex Ottoboniani latini 1424, fol. 1r-25v PubYear: 14__ Notes: Alberti probably wrote De pictura in 1434 followed by a translation into Italian as Della pittura in Cf. Spencer, 1956, 33. Some claim that the work was written between E.g. Some associate this also with a Della prospettiva which is attributed to Alberti. This implies that a person can type a title in their own language and arrive at the original. Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Title A background to chinese painting Roger Soame Jenyns 1935 A basic course in perspective drawing Norman Greenaway 1965 A basic course in technical drawingAllan Frederick Sierp 1948 A bibliography of aesthetics and of the philosophy of the fine arts from 1900 to... William A. Hammond1934 A book of perspective and geometry Sebastiano Serlio1657 A book of pictorial perspective Gwen White 1954 A book of pictorial perspective Gwen White [1955]? A booke of sundry draughtes, principaly serving for glasiers: and not impertinen... Walter Gedde 1898 A cartographical certificate by the Cologne painter, Franz Kessler R. Oehme 1954 A catalogue of medieval and renaissance optical manuscripts David C. Lindberg 1975 A catalogue of the drawings of Leonardo da Vinci... Leonardo da Vinci 1968 A catechism of perspective William Pinnock 1823 A catechism of perspective; intended as a companion to... William Pinnock [1820] A cenografia italiana do secolo XVII Sao Paolo Museo de arte moderna 1963 A cenografia Tchecoslovaquia La scénogra... Sao Paolo Bienal do teatro 1959 A characterization of ten hidden-surface algorithms Robert A. Schumacker 1974 A classical topos in the introduction to Alberti's 'Della pittura' Ernst Hans Gombrich Sir 1957 A communicational perspective of stuttering: analysis of a... Paula Kurman-Cahn 1976 A comparative and analytical study of visual depth perception Eleanor J. Gibson 1961 A comparative perspective on the phonology and noun... Kenneth Lydell Stallcup 1978 A comparative study of the concepts of space and time in …Kishore Mandal 1968 A comparison of the temporal perspectives and... Howard R. Weinreb 1970 A compendious and practical treatise on the... Bewick Bridge 1811 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Clicking on What gives an alphabetical list of all books on perspective. Click on What WHAT 1. All Titles 2. Standard Titles 3. Other Libraries Clicking on any title takes us to the book or article in question. Clicking on any author in the list takes us to the books by that author. The small box offers three alternatives. Clicking on Primary Literature limits the list to sources. Clicking on Secondary Literature limits the list to secondary books and articles. Clicking on Other Libraries introduces three further choices. Click Other Libraries WHAT: Libraries 1. Universal 2. National 3. Special Clicking on Universal Libraries gives a list of 10 libraries including BL, BNF and LC. Click Universal Universal Libraries 1. Biblithothèque Nationale 2. British Library 3. Library of Congress 4. Canada CVUC 5. France CCFR 6. Germany GBV 7. Italy ICCU 8. Russia RUSLAnet 9. US RLG UC 10. US OCLC Worldcat Clicking on Special Libraries gives a list including the Vatican, and HAB. If one chooses one of the above libraries then the questions serve as access points. In traditional catalogues there is a two separate points of access via author or title. SUMS provides access via Author, Title, Place and Date simultaneously. Continue introduction (Personal Terms) >> [Main menu][Exit]

7 Who? What? Where? When? How? Why? AuthorsTitles Places Dates Introductions Reasons See path Up - back Topic Choices Levels Refresh SUMS System for Universal Media Searching 3. Guide for Personal Terms strategy The guided and direct strategies are particularly relevant if we are searching for 1 word. Often we are searching also for a series of terms connected with a word. For this purpose a strategy involving Personal terms is more suitable. All the features available in the Direct Strategy remain available. Let’s choose Personal Terms Strategy. SUMS 1. Sources 2. Literature 3. Primary Literature 4. Secondary Literature 5. Both 6. Earlier Bibliographies CHOICE 1. Access 2. Learning 3. Levels 4. Media 5. Quality 6. Quantity 7. Questions 8. Space 9. Leisure 10. Time 11. Tools Continue introduction (Guide for Database Field Terms Strategy) >> The main difference lies in the entrance point to What. Instead of a list of titles on perspective, we begin with a list of Personal Terms. Click to start Click Choice Click Access ACCESS 1. Goal 2. Strategy 3. Visualisation Click Strategy SEARCH STRATEGY 1. Guided Choice 2. Direct 3. Personal Terms 4. Database Field Terms 5. Subject Headings 6. Standard Classification 7. Multiple Classification 8. Comparative Ontologies Click Personal Terms Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Name La Hire Astrolabe La Hire Projection Lamina Universal Landscape Drawing Landscapes Language Laser Law Leaning Pyramid Left Side View Legitimate Construction Length Letters Light and shade Line Linear Astrolabe Linear Drawing Linear Perspective Linguistics Literature Lithographic Drawing Locksmith Logarithmic Spiral A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Personal Terms WHAT 1. Terms 2. Titles 3. Other Libraries Clicking on any term brings new choices: Terms, Definitions, Explanations and Titles. Click Linear Perspective KEYWORDS: Linear Perspective 1. Terms 2. Definitions 3. Further Definitions 4. Explanations 5. Titles 6. Partial Contents 7. Full Contents Clicking on Definitions provides a personal definition of the term. Click Defenitions Linear Perspective Related keywords: Bird's Eye View Central Projection Colour Perspective Diminution Of Form Perspective One Point Perspective Perspective Linear perspective records effects of distance (inverse size/distance law) on objects as they appear on a transparent window (picture plane, plane of delineation), placed between these objects and the eye (point of sight). It is also called central, Renaissance, frontal, Brunelleschian or Albertian perspective. The viewer's position determines whether frog's eye or bird's eye perspective is involved. The position of the picture plane with respect to objects determines whether one point perspective, two point perspective or three point perspective is involved. Perspective is special because it invovles unified (homogeneous) spaces and one can work backwards (reversibility) in recreating the original space of objects. Clicking on Further Definitions uses OneFind to search 120 other dictionaries. Click Further Defenitions Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Linear Perspective Clicking on Explanations offers a choice of encyclopaedias such as Britannica 1911 etc. KEYWORDS: Linear Perspective 1. Terms 2. Definitions 3. Further Definitions 4. Explanations 5. Titles 6. Partial Contents 7. Full Contents TITLES 1. Primary Literature 2. Secondary Literature 3. Both Clicking on Titles gives a list that is a subset of the perspective bibliography. Click Titles Click Primary Literature for instance TITLES: primary 1. Chronological 2. By Title 3. By Author 4. Bibliographies 5. Standard lists Click By Title for instance Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Title 16 Tafeln zu Elementar-Linearzeichnungs Unterrichte Heinrich Weishaupt 18__ 2 Thl.: Theorie der Linear-Perspektive Carl Friedrich Christian Steiner 1861 A course in linear perspective Chace Newman 1931 A graduated course of instruction in linear perspective David Forsyth 1883 A graduated course of instruction in linear perspective David Forsyth 1885 A manual of elementary problems in linear perspectiveSamuel Edward Warren 1873 A manual of elementary problems in the linear perspective of form …Samuel Edward Warren 1868 A manual of elementary problems in the linear perspective of form …Samuel Edward Warren 1869 A manual of elementary problems in the linear perspective of form … Samuel Edward Warren 1874 A manual of elementary problems in the linear perspective of form … Samuel Edward Warren 1882 A manual of elementary problems in the linear perspective of form … Samuel Edward Warren 1886 A manual of elementary problems in the linear perspective of form … Samuel Edward Warren 1888 A manual of elementary problems in the linear perspective of form …Samuel Edward Warren 1863 A manual of elementary problems in the linear perspective of form and shadow... Samuel Edward Warren 1869 A manual of linear perspective Richard Somers Smith 1858 A manual of linear perspective. Perspective of form, shade and … Richard Somers Smith 1857 A manual of linear perspective. Perspective of form, shade and... Richard Somers Smith 1864 A popular outline of perspective or graphic projection...parallel, diagonal, pan... Thomas Morris 1869 A text book of geometrical drawing William Minifie 1850 A text book of geometrical drawing William Minifie 1855 A text book of geometrical drawing William Minifie 1865 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z [Main menu][Exit]

8 Who? What? Where? When? How? Why? AuthorsTitles Places Dates Introductions Reasons See path Up - back Topic Choices Levels Refresh SUMS System for Universal Media Searching 4. Guide for Database Fields Terms strategy Knowing the fields of the database gives us a better hope of finding what we seek. The fourth strategy level lists available database fields under each of the six questions. Click to start SUMS 1. Sources 2. Literature 3. Primary Literature 4. Secondary Literature 5. Both 6. Earlier Bibliographies CHOICE 1. Access 2. Learning 3. Levels 4. Media 5. Quality 6. Quantity 7. Questions 8. Space 9. Leisure 10. Time 11. Tools Continue introduction (Guide for Subject Headings Strategy) >> ACCESS 1. Goal 2. Strategy 3. Visualisation SEARCH STRATEGY 1. Guided Choice 2. Direct 3. Personal Terms 4. Database Field Terms 5. Subject Headings 6. Standard Classification 7. Multiple Classification 8. Comparative Ontologies Let’s choose Database Field Terms strategy. Click Database Field Terms The fourth strategy level lists available database fields under each of the six questions. Data Base Terms: Perspective WHO Author Editor Illustrator Printer Publisher Seller Translator WHAT Book Type Book Dissertation Manuscript Title Title Standard Subtitle Keyword Note Click WHO? Click WHAT? Click WHERE? WHERE Publication Place Databank Clicking on any of these fields gives access to the contents under that heading [Main menu][Exit]

9 Who? What? Where? When? How? Why? AuthorsTitles Places Dates Introductions Reasons See path Up - back Topic Choices Levels Refresh 5. Guide for Subject Headings strategy As we extend our search to major collections, we need their subject headings. In Strategy 5 we begin with subject headings of the Library of Congress. Eventually this will be expanded to include other subject headings, and keywords. Click to start SUMS 1. Sources 2. Literature 3. Primary Literature 4. Secondary Literature 5. Both 6. Earlier Bibliographies CHOICE 1. Access 2. Learning 3. Levels 4. Media 5. Quality 6. Quantity 7. Questions 8. Space 9. Leisure 10. Time 11. Tools Continue introduction (Guide for Standard Classification Strategy) >> ACCESS 1. Goal 2. Strategy 3. Visualisation SEARCH STRATEGY 1. Guided Choice 2. Direct 3. Personal Terms 4. Database Field Terms 5. Subject Headings 6. Standard Classification 7. Multiple Classification 8. Comparative Ontologies Click Subject Headings [Main menu][Exit] WHAT 1. Titles 2. Terms 3. Keywords 4. Other Libraries Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Library of Congress: Subject Headings Name Perspective Perspective Perspective Perspective Perspective Perspective Bibliography Perspective Bibliography Catalogs Perspective Bibliography. [from old catalog] Perspective Catalogs Perspective Congresses Perspective correlation in geology. [from old catalog] Perspective Data processing Perspective Early works to 1800 Perspective Early works to 1800 Addresses, essays, lectures Perspective Early works to 1800 Exhibitions Perspective Early works to [from old catalog] Perspective Exhibitions Perspective. [from old catalog] Perspective History Perspective History 17th century Congresses Perspective History Catalogs Perspective History Congresses Perspective History Exhibitions A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Clicking on any term gives access to Library of Congress holdings for that subject

10 Who? What? Where? When? How? Why? AuthorsTitles Places Dates Introductions Reasons See path Up - back Topic Choices Levels Refresh 6. Guide for Standard Classification strategy Subject headings are effectively alphabetical lists of relevant terms. Classifications are effectively tree versions of the same terms, which show their relations. Level 6 uses the LC Classification as an example of this access. Click to start SUMS 1. Sources 2. Literature 3. Primary Literature 4. Secondary Literature 5. Both 6. Earlier Bibliographies CHOICE 1. Access 2. Learning 3. Levels 4. Media 5. Quality 6. Quantity 7. Questions 8. Space 9. Leisure 10. Time 11. Tools Continue introduction (Guide for Multiple Classification Strategy) >> ACCESS 1. Goal 2. Strategy 3. Visualisation SEARCH STRATEGY 1. Guided Choice 2. Direct 3. Personal Terms 4. Database Field Terms 5. Subject Headings 6. Standard Classification 7. Multiple Classification 8. Comparative Ontologies Click Standard Classification [Main menu][Exit] Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Name Abacus Abdomen Abelian functions (including hyperelliptic) Abstract interlace Abstraction Academy Academy of art Academy of sciences Acanthus Acoustics Action in art Addition Adhocism Advanced euclidean geometry Advertisements and posters Advertising photography Aerial perspective Aerial surveying Aerial views Aerodynamics A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Combined Subject Lis Clicking on any term gives access to Library of Congress holdings for that subject

11 Who? What? Where? When? How? Why? AuthorsTitles Places Dates Introductions Reasons See path Up - back Topic Choices Levels Refresh 7. Guide for Multiple Classification strategy A classification system orders the world in accordance with one mind set or world-view. As we go further still we need access to multiple classifications, multiple world-views. We have made a combined list of terms based on art and math sections of 8 systems. Click to start SUMS 1. Sources 2. Literature 3. Primary Literature 4. Secondary Literature 5. Both 6. Earlier Bibliographies CHOICE 1. Access 2. Learning 3. Levels 4. Media 5. Quality 6. Quantity 7. Questions 8. Space 9. Leisure 10. Time 11. Tools Finish introduction >> ACCESS 1. Goal 2. Strategy 3. Visualisation SEARCH STRATEGY 1. Guided Choice 2. Direct 3. Personal Terms 4. Database Field Terms 5. Subject Headings 6. Standard Classification 7. Multiple Classification 8. Comparative Ontologies Click Multiple Classification [Main menu][Exit] Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. Name Abacus Abdomen Abelian functions (including hyperelliptic) Abstract interlace Abstraction Academy Academy of art Academy of sciences Acanthus Acoustics Action in art Addition Adhocism Advanced euclidean geometry Advertisements and posters Advertising photography Aerial perspective Aerial surveying Aerial views Aerodynamics A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Combined Subject Lis Clicking on any term now highlights which of the 8 systems deal with that term Click Adhocism TERMS: Adhocism 1. AAT 2. Bliss 3. Dewey 4. Goettingen 5. Iconclass 6. LC 7. Rang 8. Riders 9. Direct link Clicking on any of these highlighted systems takes one to the term within their system Click AAT Let us begin with Who. For instance, if we type the variant name Leo Noster we arrive at Leon Battista Alberti. CallnumValue BM.188 adhocism BM.189 anti art BM.190 dynamism BM.191 ideism BM.192 machine aesthetic BM.193 Poussinism BM.194 primitivism BM.195 rationalism (architecture) BM.196 representation KT.246 laying in KT.247 overpainting KT.248 KT.249 finger painting KT.250 roller painting KT.251 stumping KT.252 KT.253 camaieu KT.254 cirage KT.255 grisaille KT.256 faux finishing KT.257 antiquing This allows one to study other related terms in their system. Clicking on this term/related terms within their system gives their entries. Click ideism TERMS: ideism 1. Terms 2. No Definition 3. Explanations 4. Further Definitions 5. Titles 6. Partial Contents 7. Full Contents 8. Direct link We have following choice to work with term ideism

12 The end. Maastricht March 2004.

13 To be continued… Next slides are materials…


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