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Before You Begin Look at the picture and write as many short word combinations as you can for things you can see in the picture. Make a web and write.

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Presentation on theme: "Before You Begin Look at the picture and write as many short word combinations as you can for things you can see in the picture. Make a web and write."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Before You Begin Look at the picture and write as many short word combinations as you can for things you can see in the picture. Make a web and write ‘feeling’ and ‘descriptive’ words for someone who has been in an earthquake. earthquake

3 Before You Begin Sit in pairs and use your webs to tell each other how you felt and what you saw during an earthquake. You can pretend that you lived there or went there as journalists. earthquake

4 A CONNECTING TO YOUR LIFE Make a T-chart and write two headings for it like the one below. Listen to the CD and write down information under the headings. Things I can see Events Remember: You need to work alone and cannot ask questions or interrupt while the CD is playing. 1. Tuning In

5 A CONNECTING TO YOUR LIFE Work in pairs and tell each other which picture each survivor talking about and the reasons for choosing that particular picture. Things I can see Events 1. Tuning In

6 A CONNECTING TO YOUR LIFE Study each picture again and write notes of the effects of each natural disaster, and what it could do to people. Use the chart below to help you. Tell each other the effects in pairs, when you finish. 2. Talking It Over

7 B GETTING READY TO READ Read the sentences and decide which method is most suitable for helping them find the meaning of each underlined word. Write the letter of the method next to the sentence. When you finish doing this, tell each other in pairs or groups of three the method you used for finding out the meaning. Continued on next slide 1. Learning New Words

8 B GETTING READY TO READ Method A: I read the ‘cause’. I think of the ‘effect’ of that cause. I ask myself: If ………… then ……. The unfamiliar word means the effect of such a cause. Method B: When I see a new and unfamiliar word, I look for another word in another sentence that refers to the unfamiliar word. The referent word could mean the same as the unfamiliar word. Remember: it is more important to learn the methods than just get the meaning of the word. 1. Learning New Words

9 B GETTING READY TO READ Method C: When I see a new and unfamiliar word, I look for an example in another sentence to give me the meaning. The example sometimes comes before or after the new and unfamiliar word. Remember: it is more important to learn the methods than just get the meaning of the word. 1. Learning New Words

10 B GETTING READY TO READ Examples If the buildings were destroyed, then demolished mean destroyed. If all the buildings fell down, then debris means what is left after a building falls. [debris is pronounced deb  ry] I heard a rumble ……. The sound …... Then rumble means sound. A normal morning. I got up …took a shower … ate breakfast. Things that happen all the time = normal 1. Learning New Words

11 B GETTING READY TO READ Examples First match the words to their meanings and then compare your answers in pairs. Tell each other in pairs which method you used for each sentence and what the meaning of each word is. 1. Learning New Words

12 B GETTING READY TO READ ‘Describing an event’ is the ability to let the listener or reader feel as if they were at the place where something happened. It is a skill you should develop every day. The next task helps you learn to ‘describe an event’ in a more vivid manner. 2. Talking It Over

13 B GETTING READY TO READ Do the following. Write ideas and words in the table on page 41. Tell each other in pairs what you wrote and copy ideas from each other if you like the other’s ideas. Form a different pair and use the table to describe the event. (One student in the pair can be the journalist and the second can be the survivor. You should switch roles when you finish.) 2. Talking It Over

14 C READING TO LEARN Do number one alone and then tell each other in pairs your answers. 1. Before You Read

15 C READING TO LEARN You are going to listen to someone describing an event and you are to read along silently. Write the title of the unit in a circle and each think of words that come to your minds for it. Write the words and then tell each other in pairs what you have written. 2. Let’s Read I survived a tornado

16 C READING TO LEARN There are many strategies you can use while you are reading and one of them is called ‘visualizing’. To understand ‘visualizing’, draw a picture for each of the following sentences from the selection. [Only 2 minutes per sentence]. We looked out of the window and the sky was totally clear. My mom looked in the other direction and it was really black. I remember seeing a car up in a tree. Show each other your drawings in groups of three to four. 2. Let’s Read

17 C READING TO LEARN IMPORTANT Listen and read along. As you are reading you should visualize events that happened in the selection. A film director ‘visualizes’ events in the story he or she reads and then recreates them for filming. Pretend that you are a film director and visualize the events as you read along with the CD silently. 2. Let’s Read

18 C READING TO LEARN Choose one of the events in the selection and draw a picture for it. Pretend that you are a movie director and the picture will help your assistants understand how to set up the scene for filming. Show each other you pictures in groups of three to four. This step is important because the visualizing will help you find the main idea and details of the selection. 2. Let’s Read

19 C READING TO LEARN 1. One way to find the main idea in a ‘description of an event’ selection is to remember all the parts you visualized and make one idea that holds all of them together. What were all the events that you visualized? Think of answers to the above question, put the ideas together and then do number 1 on page Unlocking Meaning

20 C READING TO LEARN 2. Visualizing also helps you find the details in a ‘description of an event’ selection. Remain silent for 1 minute and remember all the events you read about and visualized. Do number 2 on page 43. Tell each other you answers in pairs after you finish. 3. Unlocking Meaning

21 C READING TO LEARN 3. Winds of different speeds are given names. These names help people to know what precautions to take. These winds are listed in a table called Fujita Scale. [ F-0 Gale] Reread the selection quickly and underline only what damages the tornado caused. 3. Unlocking Meaning

22 C READING TO LEARN Read the Fujita Scale chart and find the wind speed that can cause the damages the tornado in the selection caused. Tell each other your answers in pairs. 3. Unlocking Meaning Rip off: remove by force Peel off: remove like a banana peel

23 C READING TO LEARN 4. When you are listening to find out if information is true or false, you will need to remember what details you are listening for. Read the sentences in number 4 and underline the parts of each. Remember that each part answers who, what, how, where, when, and action (verb). If any of the underlined parts is different from what you hear as you listen to the information on the CD, then the sentence is false. Listen and mark the false sentences with an x. 3. Unlocking Meaning

24 C READING TO LEARN Answers A tornado is a violent storm that occurs over the ocean. Wind speeds are always over 500 km/h. (km/h = kilometers per hour) For some reason, tornadoes only occur in the U.S. A tornado begins to form when cold air meets warm air. The winds of a tornado always blows from north to south. Almost all tornadoes occur during the winter, when it rains a lot. 3. Unlocking Meaning


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