Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Status Attainment and Mobility n Social mobility –Blau and Duncan’s Status Attainment Model –Wisconsin School of Mobility Studies.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Status Attainment and Mobility n Social mobility –Blau and Duncan’s Status Attainment Model –Wisconsin School of Mobility Studies."— Presentation transcript:

1 Status Attainment and Mobility n Social mobility –Blau and Duncan’s Status Attainment Model –Wisconsin School of Mobility Studies

2 Social mobility: “any transition of an individual or social object or value— anything that has been created or modified by human activity—from one social position to another.” (Pitirim A.Sorokin, 1959)

3 Father’s Education Father’s Occupation Son’s Occupation in 1962 Son’s 1st Occupation Son’s Education Blau and Duncan’s Status Attainment Model

4 Son’s Occupation (in percent) Father’s Occupation Upper White- Collar Lower White- Collar Upper Manual Lower ManualFarmTotal Upper white-collar Lower white-collar Upper manual Lower Manual Farm Total Basic Mobility Table Structure

5 Son’s Occupation (in percent) Father’s Occupation Upper White- Collar Lower White- Collar Upper Manual Lower ManualFarmTotal Upper white-collar Lower white-collar Upper manual Lower Manual Farm Total Outflow from Father’s Occupation to Son’s Occupation,

6 Son’s Occupation (in percent) Father’s Occupation Upper White- Collar Lower White- Collar Upper Manual Lower ManualFarmTotal Upper white-collar Lower white-collar Upper manual Lower Manual Farm Total Outflow from Father’s Occupation to Son’s Occupation, Upward Mobility Downward Mobility

7 Upward Mobility Downward Mobility

8 Basic Conclusions from Mobility and Status Attainment Research Though upward mobility has slowed somewhat, overall, upward mobility still outweighs downward mobility (in general). Occupational inheritance in the U.S. is fairly high at the top and bottom of the occupational structure. Between the extremes, inheritance is less and intergenerational mobility is relatively greater. Overall, most social mobility in U.S. is short- range mobility.

9 Basic Conclusions from Mobility and Status Attainment Research The occupational pattern for Blacks in the U.S. indicates that there is much occupational inheritance at the bottom of the occupational hierarchy and occupational disinheritance at the top. Women, in general, are concentrated in lower non-manual positions. No matter where women originate (in terms of parental occupation), they are likely to move into lower non-manual positions.

10 Basic Conclusions from Mobility and Status Attainment Research Both family background and education are strongly related to career success. Family background can give some people a “double boost” if they are from a privileged background… –Parental status can affect career success (e.g. parent may have “connections”) –High parental status affects educational attainment (thus, family background has an indirect effect on career success through education)

11 Basic Conclusions from Mobility and Status Attainment Research Background variables account for nearly half of the variance in occupational attainment. This includes parental occupation, parental education, income, and race. Though the effect of education on career success matches that of background, there is a persistent problem of lack of access to education among various groups (especially low income, and racial minorities).

12 Basic Conclusions from Mobility and Status Attainment Research The most recent research on occupational mobility indicates that occupational inheritance is on the rise and the affect of education on attainment is declining.

13 Sample Annotation Korenman, Sanders, David Neumark “Does Marriage Really Make Men More Productive?” The Journal of Human Resources 26(2): Addresses the question of why married men earn more than non-married men—even after controlling for relevant human capital variables, region, and industry. Examines the hypothesis that the marriage premium is based on productivity differences between married and non-married men. The authors confirm the existence of a marriage premium for white men even controlling for human capital variables. Data is dated (1984). Results are in contrast to 1992 article by same author which explores marriage/motherhood penalty for women. Article has very nice review of the research done on the causes of the marriage premium for men. Addresses the question of why married men earn more than non-married men—even after controlling for relevant human capital variables, region, and industry. Examines the hypothesis that the marriage premium is based on productivity differences between married and non-married men. The authors confirm the existence of a marriage premium for white men even controlling for human capital variables. Data is dated (1984). Results are in contrast to 1992 article by same author which explores marriage/motherhood penalty for women. Article has very nice review of the research done on the causes of the marriage premium for men.

14 Rank the following occupations according to their general standing in society: n Doctor n Secretary n School teacher n Waiter/waitress n Maid/servant

15 NORC Ranking/Duncan SEI n Doctor (92) n School teacher (70-72) n Secretary(44) n Waiter/waitress (16) n Maid/servant (7)


Download ppt "Status Attainment and Mobility n Social mobility –Blau and Duncan’s Status Attainment Model –Wisconsin School of Mobility Studies."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google