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KINESIOLOGY Scientific Basis of Human Motion, 12 th edition Hamilton, Weimar & Luttgens Presentation Created by TK Koesterer, Ph.D., ATC Humboldt State.

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Presentation on theme: "KINESIOLOGY Scientific Basis of Human Motion, 12 th edition Hamilton, Weimar & Luttgens Presentation Created by TK Koesterer, Ph.D., ATC Humboldt State."— Presentation transcript:

1 KINESIOLOGY Scientific Basis of Human Motion, 12 th edition Hamilton, Weimar & Luttgens Presentation Created by TK Koesterer, Ph.D., ATC Humboldt State University Revised by Hamilton & Weimar Copyright © 2012 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill/Irwin

2 Name, locate, & describe the structure & ligamentous reinforcements of the joints. 2. Name & demonstrate movements possible. 3. Name & locate muscles & muscle groups, and name their primary actions. 4. Analyze the fundamental movements with respect to joint & muscle actions. 5. Describe common injuries.

3 5-3  Articulation of acromion & distal end of clavicle.  Acromioclavicular ligament strengthens joint superiorly.  Aponeurosis of trapezius & deltoid strengthen joint posteriorly.  Coracoclavicular ligament further stabilizes joint. Fig 5.1

4 5-4  Proximal clavicle articulates with sternum and cartilage of 1 st rib.  Capsule thickened by anterior & posterior sternoclavicular ligaments.  The only bony connection between the humerus and axial skeleton.  Permits limited motion of the clavicle.  Partially responsible for movements of the scapula.  Clavicular movements at the SC joint:  elevation & depression,  protraction & retraction,  forward & backward rotation. Fig 5.2

5 5-5 Fig 5.3 a & b Abduction (Protraction) Adduction (Retraction) Elevation Depression

6 5-6 Fig 5.3 c & d Upward rotation Downward rotation Anterior tilt Posterior tilt

7 5-7  Location:  Anterior  Pectoralis minor, Serratus anterior, Subclavius  Posterior  Levator scapulae, Rhomboids, Trapezius

8 5-8 Function:  Movements of scapula: downward rotation, anterior tilt, depression.  Lifting effect on ribs in forced inspiration and posture. Fig 5.4

9 5-9 Function:  Abduct (protract) scapula.  With trapezius, upward rotation of scapula.  Active in reaching and pushing. Fig 5.4

10 5-10 Function:  Protect and stabilize sternoclavicular joint.  Depress scapula. Fig 5.4

11 5-11 Function:  Elevation and downward rotation of scapula. Fig 5.5

12 5-12 Function:  Downward rotation, adduction (retraction), & elevation of scapula.  Works with trapezius for maintenance of good posture. Fig 5.5

13 5-13 Function: I. Elevation II. Elevation, upward rotation, adduction III. Adduction IV. Upward rotation, depression, adduction Fig 5.6

14 5-14  Articulation of spherical head of humerus with small, shallow glenoid fossa of scapula.  Glenoid labrum deepens the fossa and cushions impact of humeral head in forceful movements. Fig 5.7 Fig 5.8

15 5-15  Coracohumeral  Glenohumeral  Coracoacromial Fig 5.9

16 5-16  Superior: supraspinatus & long head of biceps.  Inferior: long head of triceps.  Anterior: subscapularis, pectoralis major, & teres major.  Posterior: infraspinatus & teres minor.

17 5-17  Flexion / Extension  Hyperextension  Circumduction  Abduction / Adduction  Horizontal  Diagonal  Internal / External Rotation Internal rotation External rotation

18 5-18  Location:  Anterior: Pectoralis major, coracobrachialis, subscapularis, biceps brachii.  Posterior: Infraspinatus, teres minor.  Superior: Deltoid, supraspinatus.  Inferior: Latissimus dorsi, teres major, long head of triceps brachii.

19 5-19 Function: Clavicular portion – flexion, horizontal adduction, and internal rotation of humerus. Sternal portion – downward & forward movements of arm, & internal rotation with adduction. Fig 5.11

20 5-20 Function:  Horizontal adduction  Acts like a guy wire to stabilize the shoulder joint. Fig 5.12

21 5-21 Function:  Flexion at the elbow & supination of forearm.  Horizontal adduction at shoulder.  Short head sometimes active in adduction & internal rotation. Fig 5.12

22 5-22 Function:  Anterior – all forward movements & internal rotation of humerus.  Middle – abduction  Powerful abductor of humerus.  Posterior – extension, hyperextension, horizontal extension, adduction. Fig 5.14

23 5-23 Function:  Internal rotation of humerus as part of the rotator cuff.  Contributes to stability of shoulder joint. Fig 5.13a

24 5-24 Function:  Acts with deltoid in abduction of the arm.  Active in flexion & horizontal extension.  Contributes to stability of shoulder joint.  Part of the rotator cuff. Fig 5.13b

25 5-25 Function:  External rotation as part of the rotator cuff.  With subscapularis depresses head of humerus.  Contributes to stability of shoulder joint. Fig 5.13b

26 5-26 Function:  Extension & adduction of arm, internal rotation. Fig 5.14

27 5-27 Function:  Internal rotation, extension, & adduction of the arm. Fig 5.15

28 5-28 Function:  Long head assists in adduction, extension, and hyperextension of the humerus. Fig 5.15

29 5-29  Movements of the arm on the trunk involve the cooperative action of the shoulder girdle  Acromioclavicular joints  Sternoclavicular joints and the shoulder (glenohumeral) joint.

30 5-30  Shoulder Joint: Abduction  Deltoid & supraspinaus  Shoulder Girdle: Upward rotation of scapula  Serratus anterior; trapezius II & IV Fig 5.16 Fig 5.17  Shoulder Joint: Adduction  Latissimus dorsi, teres major, pectoralis major (sternal), & post. deltoid.  Shoulder Girdle: reduction of upward rotation  Rhomboids & pectoralis minor.

31 5-31  Shoulder Joint: Flexion  Anterior deltoid & pectoralis major (clavicular).  Shoulder Girdle: Upward rotation of scapula  Serratus anterior & trapezius II & IV. Fig 5.18

32 5-32  Shoulder Joint: Extension  Pectoralis major (sternal), teres major, latissimus dorsi, post. deltoid.  Shoulder Girdle: Reduction of upward rotation of scapula  Relaxation of agonists  Against resistance - trapezius IV, rhomboids, pect. minor. Fig 5.19 Fig 5.20  Shoulder Joint: Hyperextension  Teres major, latissimus dorsi, post. Deltoid.  Shoulder Girdle: Anterior tilt of scapula  Pectoralis minor.

33 5-33  Shoulder Joint: External Rotation  Infraspinatus & teres minor  Shoulder Girdle: Adduction of scapula  Rhomboids & trapezius III. Fig 5.22a

34 5-34  Shoulder Joint: Internal Rotation  Subscapularis, teres major, latissimus dorsi, ant. deltoid, pectoralis major.  Shoulder Girdle: Abduction of scapula  Serratus anterior & pectoralis minor.  Shoulder Joint: Horizontal Adduction  Pectoralis major, ant. deltoid, & coracobrachialis. Fig 5.22b  Shoulder Girdle: Abduction of scapula  Serratus anterior & pectoralis minor  Shoulder Joint: Horizontal Abduction  Post. deltoid, post middle deltoid, infraspinatus, teres minor, long head of biceps.  Shoulder Girdle: Adduction of scapula  Rhomboids & trapezius III.

35 5-35  Diagonal forward-downward and slightly inward movement of the arm. Fig 5.23 Fig 5.10

36 5-36  AC joint forced beyond normal ROM.  Downward blow to outer end of shoulder.  Fall on outstretched hand.  Damage consists of tearing or severe stretching of AC ligaments.

37 5-37  Clavicle fractures have causes similar to AC sprain:  Downward blow to outer end of shoulder.  Fall on outstretched hand.  May indicate injury by supporting injured arm.  Head may be tilted toward injured side with face turned to opposite side.

38 5-38  May be forward, downward, or posterior.  Most likely when arm is forcefully abducted and laterally rotated.  May occur by a blow to top of shoulder.  Head of humerus is forced out of the glenoid fossa.  Arm held out from side in a position of slight abduction and lateral rotation.  Loss of normal rounded contour of deltoid muscle.

39 5-39  Supraspinatus (supraspinatus tendon) most often injured.  Nature of injury depends on arm kinematics.  Caused by overuse, falls, or violent, fast arm motion.

40 5-40  Soft tissue superior to humeral head pressed against acromion process.  Due to overuse, inflammation, trapped bursa, degeneration with aging.  Will cause pain and inflammation in shoulder.


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