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Unit 1: Types of Low-Pressure Spray Polyurethane Foam Products and Uses.

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Presentation on theme: "Unit 1: Types of Low-Pressure Spray Polyurethane Foam Products and Uses."— Presentation transcript:

1 Unit 1: Types of Low-Pressure Spray Polyurethane Foam Products and Uses

2 Grant Provided by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) This material produced under grant SH SH1 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

3 Welcome to Unit 1 In this unit, you will learn about: The focus of this training program Key differences between low pressure (LP) and high pressure spray polyurethane foam (SPF) Common types of LP SPF products Typical uses for LP SPF products

4 NOT Included - Two-Component High Pressure Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) Training This training DOES NOT cover two-component high pressure (HP) SPF. HP SPF systems: Are usually used to insulate large areas on new construction, such as walls or roofs, or major renovations Use SPF chemicals typically stored in 55 gallon drums (A-side and B-side) Use heated SPF chemicals applied with high pressure, using equipment housed in trucks or trailer “spray rigs” Require advanced training specific to HP SPF

5 Two-Component High Pressure Spray Polyurethane Foam Training Required Two-component high pressure SPF systems are for professional SPF contractors. Specialized personal protective equipment (PPE) is required by OSHA, including an approved respirator. HP SPF systems REQUIRE proper training (like certification). SPF manufacturers and industry associations, such as the Spray Polyurethane Foam Alliance (SPFA), offer training. The Center for the Polyurethanes Industry (CPI) offers FREE High Pressure SPF Chemical Health and Safety Training at

6 Low Pressure Spray Polyurethane Foam Chemical Health and Safety Training This training is for weatherization professionals and spray polyurethane foam (SPF) contractors, applicators, helpers or other workers who may use: Two-Component Low Pressure SPFInsulating Foam Sealant

7 Key Differences Between Low Pressure and High Pressure SPF Products SPF Product LOW PRESSURE (LP) Two-Component LP Kits LOW PRESSURE (LP) LP Refillable Systems HIGH PRESSURE (HP) HP Spray Systems Intended use Air seal/insulate small to mid-size areas Air seal/insulate small to mid-size areas Insulate large surface areas PressureLess than 250 psi psi Output (Full Trigger) Up to 2-5 lbs. per min. Standard fan or cone nozzle Up to 2-5 lbs. per min. Standard fan or cone nozzle Up to 30 lbs. per min. Mixer/Housing Static mixer/Nozzle Chamber mixing /Spray gun ContainerSingle use cylindersRefillable tanks55 gallon drums Hoses 9-15 ft. hose/nozzle30-60 ft. hoses ft. heated hoses Transfer pump system Up to 400 ft. heated hoses Product Temp. (See manufacturer’s recommendations) 70°F-90°F (21°C-32°C) Optimal temp. for std. systems 70°F-90°F (21°C-32°C) Optimal temp. for std. systems 120°F-150°F (49°C-65°C) Machine heater system

8 Key Differences Between Low Pressure (LP) and High Pressure (HP) SPF (continued) High pressure SPF is applied with a spray gun that “atomizes” the chemicals under higher heat and pressure than LP SPF, so this can generate a finer spray mist that may linger in the air longer. Low pressure SPF is generally sprayed at a slower rate under lower pressure than HP SPF, so this can generate larger, heavier droplets that may fall out of the air more quickly. These factors can result in lower potential exposure risks when using LP SPF. Use good safety practices, including proper personal protective equipment (PPE), during ALL SPF applications. (more in later Units)

9 Types of Low Pressure SPF Products There are two common types of low pressure spray polyurethane products used for weatherization projects: Insulating foam sealantsTwo-component low pressure kits/systems

10 Insulating Foam Sealants Intended for Do-It-Yourself (DIY) and professional use; widely available in home improvement centers Also known as “foam in a can” or “one- component foam”; commonly sold in ounce cans Applied using a straw adaptor or dispensing nozzle for “bead-type” air sealing and adhering Small volume and ease of use make them popular for filling gaps and cracks, such as sealing windows and doors NOT intended for large surfaces, such as walls or roofs

11 Insulating Foam Sealant - Common Ingredients Common ingredients are listed on the label and may vary slightly by product. These include: pMDI (polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate) a blend of polyols, catalyst, propellant, surfactants and flame retardants The pre-mixed ingredients react inside the can When sprayed, moisture in the air helps cure the foam Before the foam has sufficiently hardened, there could be potential for exposure to the foam Follow safety guidance on the product label

12 Insulating Foam Sealants – Good Safety Practices Read and follow ALL instructions on the label. Open windows/doors as suggested by the manufacturer to help provide ventilation. (e.g. fans may be useful) Wear proper protective gear as suggested by the manufacturer including: safety glasses/goggles, gloves and full-coverage clothing to keep foam off your skin.

13 Insulating Foam Sealants – More Good Safety Practices Keep others away from immediate spray area until foam has sufficiently hardened for a length of time per manufacturer’s instructions. Extinguish heat sources, sparks and open flames in the spray area, adjacent rooms and behind neighboring walls. Do NOT smoke while spraying. Avoid installing near sources of high heat, such as around fireplaces, heaters, radiators, heat lamps, bare copper wires, inside electrical boxes or recessed lighting. Clean up the work area, including foam trimmings (See Unit 13).

14 Two-Component Low Pressure SPF kits/systems For professional use, typically weatherization professionals and SPF contractors For mid-sized air sealing and insulating projects and applied using a spray nozzle Typically applied at room temperature and usually pressurized at less than 250 lbs./square inch Commonly available in portable LP kits and refillable systems (some manufacturers accept empty tanks for refill)

15 Two-Component Low Pressure SPF Kits/Systems - Typical Uses Insulate/air seal small to mid-sized areas around homes and buildings, such as attics, crawl spaces and rim joists. Some other common uses include: Stud wall cavities: Seal/coat the perimeter of stud wall cavities. Enhance primary insulation: Combined with primary insulation to fill small holes, seams or gaps. Hybrid insulation applications: Combined with flash and batt or hybrid insulation systems.

16 Two-Component Low Pressure SPF Kits/Systems – More Typical Uses Attics: Insulate/air seal attics, including floor penetrations around pipes, wires and fan enclosures. (Special manufacturer instruction is required when using SPF near recessed lighting cans). Crawlspaces: Insulate/air seal crawl spaces to reduce moisture and air leakage (can help prevent mold and mildew problems).

17 Two-Component Low Pressure SPF Kits/Systems – More Typical Uses Rim joists and gaps/cracks: Seal around rim joists, duct work, electrical wire protrusions and other gaps/cracks. Roof sealing around protrusions: Seal around faulty flashings, vents or equipment. Roof repair: Repair holes, fill cracks and patch roofs (often after Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) equipment changes).

18 Unit 1 Summary In this unit, you learned about: The focus of this training: low pressure spray polyurethane foam The key differences between low pressure SPF and high pressure SPF Common types of low pressure SPF products Typical uses for LP SPF products

19 Unit 1 Review KnowledgeIntoAction

20 Unit 1: Q1 Debrief When describing differences between two-component low pressure (LP) SPF and high pressure (HP) SPF, which of the following is not true? A.LP SPF is applied in smaller volumes than HP SPF. B.LP SPF products use large 55 gallon drums to store A-side and B-side chemicals. C.LP SPF is typically sprayed at room temperature versus HP SPF which is heated to temperatures of °F while being sprayed. D.LP SPF is pressurized at less than 250 psi versus HP SPF which is typically pressurized at psi.

21 Unit 1: Q1 Debrief When describing differences between two-component low pressure (LP) SPF and high pressure (HP) SPF, which of the following is not true? A.LP SPF is applied in smaller volumes than HP SPF. B.LP SPF products use large 55 gallon drums to store A-side and B-side chemicals. C.LP SPF is typically sprayed at room temperature versus HP SPF which is heated to temperatures of °F while being sprayed. D.LP SPF is pressurized at less than 250 psi versus HP SPF which is typically pressurized at psi.

22 Unit 1: Q2 Debrief Which of the following is true when applying insulating foam sealant? A.Read and follow all instructions on the label. B.Wear proper protective gear as suggested by the manufacturer including: safety glasses/goggles, gloves and full-coverage clothing. C.Open windows/doors to help provide good ventilation as recommended by the manufacturer (e.g. fans may be useful). D.All of the above.

23 Unit 1: Q2 Debrief Which of the following is true when applying insulating foam sealant? A.Read and follow all instructions on the label. B.Wear proper protective gear as suggested by the manufacturer including: safety glasses/goggles; gloves and full-coverage clothing. C.Open windows/doors and to help provide good ventilation as recommended by the manufacturer (e.g. fans may be useful). D.All of the above.

24 Unit 1: Q3 Debrief Which of the following is not a typical use for low pressure SPF kits/systems? A.Enhancing primary insulation to fill small holes and gaps. B.Insulating and air sealing attics and crawl spaces. C.Sealing around rim joists, duct work and pipes. D.Insulating large roofing surfaces.

25 Unit 1: Q3 Debrief Which of the following is not a typical use for low pressure SPF kits/systems? A.Enhancing primary insulation to fill small holes and gaps. B.Insulating and air sealing attics and crawl spaces. C.Sealing around rim joists, duct work and pipes. D.Insulating large roofing surfaces.

26 Unit 1 Completed  Continue to Unit 2  Return to the Main Menu


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