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Return to Hubble: Servicing Mission 4 Dr. Frank Summers Space Telescope Science Institute April 2, 2009.

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Presentation on theme: "Return to Hubble: Servicing Mission 4 Dr. Frank Summers Space Telescope Science Institute April 2, 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 Return to Hubble: Servicing Mission 4 Dr. Frank Summers Space Telescope Science Institute April 2, 2009

2 2 A Space Telescope

3 3

4 4 Artist’s Illustration WRONG Photograph CORRECT

5 5 Size of Earth Size of Earth’s Atmosphere 6400 km 600 km above surface Size of Hubble’s Orbit 100 km above surface

6 6

7 7

8 8 Some Hubble History

9 – Space telescope proposed 1962 – National Academy of Sciences recommends Lyman Spitzer 1976 – NASA & ESA collaborate 1977 – Congress funds project 1985 – Construction complete 1986 – Challenger accident

10 – Launch 1993 – Servicing Mission – Servicing Mission – Mission extended from 15 to 20 years 1999 – Servicing Mission 3A 2002 – Servicing Mission 3B 2003 – Columbia accident 2004 – No shuttle mission? 2005 – Two gyro mode 2006 – “One final house call” 2008 – Hardware delay

11 11 What Makes Hubble So Great?

12 12 Clear View – located above blurring effects of atmosphere

13 13 Serviceable – new instruments every few years keeps it current

14 14 Public – Observers get only one year of exclusive access

15 15 Professional – STScI provides excellent support to scientists

16 16 Houston, We Have a Problem

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22 22 Hubble Servicing Missions

23 23 Servicing Mission 1 – December 1993 COSTAR, WFPC2 solar arrays, gyros

24 24 Servicing Mission 2 – February 1997 NICMOS, STIS fine guidance sensor, solid state recorder, reaction wheel assembly

25 25 Servicing Mission 3A – December 1999 gyroscope failure in November computer, data recorder, fine guidance sensor, electronics improvement, thermal protection

26 26 Servicing Mission 3B – March 2002 ACS solar arrays, NICMOS cooling system, reaction wheel assembly, power control unit

27 27 Servicing Mission 4 – May 2009 WFC3, COS ACS repair, STIS repair, gyros, batteries, fine guidance sensor, thermal blanket, de-orbit module

28 28 Servicing Mission 4 – May 2009 WFC3, COS ACS repair, STIS repair, gyros, batteries, fine guidance sensor, thermal blanket, de-orbit module

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35 35 Hubble, We Have an Anomaly

36 36

37 37

38 38 SM4: An Ambitious Workload

39 39 SM4: An Ambitious Workload “This final mission will be, without doubt, the most complicated and challenging that NASA has ever mounted.”

40 40 Major Goals for SM4 1Enhance Hubble’s scientific capabilities with a new camera and new spectrograph WFC3, a panchromatic camera, replacing WFPC2 COS, a very efficient spectrograph, replacing COSTAR 2Restore existing Hubble capability through in-situ repair STIS: repair failed electronics ACS: repair failed electronics 3Upgrade Hubble to last to beyond 2014 Install refurbished Fine Guidance Sensor Install 6 new gyros Install 6 new batteries Install thermal protection covers Install Capture Mechanism for de-orbit mission If successful, HST will be at the height of its power, with 6 working, complementary, science instruments

41 41 NOTE: Now that SM4 is officially manifested and a crew has been assigned, the EVA timeline is controlled by the Space Shuttle Program.

42 42 Wide Field Camera 3 –WFC3…

43 43 Wide Field Camera 3 WFC3 has two wide field cameras –near ultraviolet and optical imaging (UVIS) –near infrared imaging camera (IR) First truly panchromatic camera Improves on ACS & NICMOS –UVIS >30x discovery power of ACS/WFPC2 –IR 15-20x discovery power of NICMOS

44 44 Camera Comparison

45 45 Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

46 46 COS Instrument OSM1

47 47 Cosmic Origins Spectrograph COS optimized for ultraviolet observations Far Ultraviolet Channel –1-reflection, aberration-corrected along dispersion –2 side-by-side 16k by 1k pixel detector (FUSE design) –Records arrival time of every detected photon –3 gratings; 300 or 800 (nm) spectral range –Resolving power ~3000, ~20,000 [115 to 205 nm] Near Ultraviolet Channel –Fully corrected optical design –1k by 1k pixel detector (STIS design) –Records arrival time of every detected photon –4 gratings –10 to 80 nanometers spectral ranges –Resolving power ~2000, ~20,000 [170 to 320 nm]

48 48 COS vs STIS

49 49 ACS Repair Advanced Camera for Surveys ACS failure in January 2007 Cut through a grill Similar to WFC3, but …

50 50 STIS Repair Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph STIS failure in August 2002 > 100 fasteners Similar to COS, but …

51 51 Gyros 3 gyros operating is nominal 2 gyro mode since failed, 2 operating, 1 spare

52 52 G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6

53 53 Batteries Hubble can not point without batteries About 100,000 charge-discharge cycles

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56 56 Bay 8 Thermal Situation BAY9 BAY8 SM3B Survey

57 57 Bay 8 Thermal Situation Patched during SM2, however expected to be completely degraded PATCH BAY 7 BAY 8

58 58 Bay 8 Thermal Situation

59 59 Possible severe scheduling impacts Possible Bay 8 Impacts

60 60 SM4 Preparations

61 61

62 62 HFMS Fit Check

63 63 HFMS Fit Check

64 64 ASIPE Fit Check

65 65

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68 68 HST equipment at KSC

69 69 May 12, 2009

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