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Introduction to Friction. Friction Friction is the force that opposes a sliding motion. Friction is due to microscopic irregularities in even the smoothest.

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Presentation on theme: "Introduction to Friction. Friction Friction is the force that opposes a sliding motion. Friction is due to microscopic irregularities in even the smoothest."— Presentation transcript:

1 Introduction to Friction

2 Friction Friction is the force that opposes a sliding motion. Friction is due to microscopic irregularities in even the smoothest of surfaces. Friction is highly useful. It enables us to walk and drive a car, among other things. Friction is also dissipative. That means it causes mechanical energy to be converted to heat. We’ll learn more about that later.

3 Friction depends on the normal force. The friction that exists between two surfaces is directly proportional to the normal force. Increasing the normal force increases friction; decreasing the normal force decreases friction. This has several implications, such as…  Friction on a sloping surface is less than friction on a flat surface (since the normal force is less on a slope).  Increasing weight of an object increases the friction between the object and the surface it is resting on.  Weighting down a car over the drive wheels increases the friction between the drive wheels and the road (which increases the car’s ability to accelerate).

4 Static Friction This type of friction occurs between two surfaces that are not slipping relative to each other. f s   s N  f s : static frictional force (N)   s : coefficient of static friction  N: normal force (N)

5 f s <  s N is an inequality! The fact that the static friction equation is an inequality has important implications. Static friction between two surfaces is zero unless there is a force trying to make the surfaces slide on one another. Static friction can increase as the force trying to push an object increases until it reaches its maximum allowed value as defined by  s. Once the maximum value of static friction has been exceeded by an applied force, the surfaces begin to slide and the friction is no longer static friction.

6 Static friction and applied horizontal force Physics N W Force Diagram surface f s = 0 There is no static friction since there is no applied horizontal force trying to slide the book on the surface.

7 Static friction and applied horizontal force Physics N W Force Diagram surface Ffsfs 0 < f s <  s N and f s = F Static friction is equal to the applied horizontal force, and there is no movement of the book since  F = 0.

8 Static friction and applied horizontal force Physics N W Force Diagram surface Ffsfs f s =  s N and f s = F Static friction is at its maximum value! It is still equal to F, but if F increases any more, the book will slide.

9 Static friction and applied horizontal force Physics N W Force Diagram surface Ffkfk f s =  s N and f s < F Static friction cannot increase any more! The book accelerates to the right. Friction becomes kinetic friction, which is usually a smaller force.

10 Static friction on a ramp Physics N surface fsfs W x = mgsin  and N = mgcos  At maximum angle before the book slides, we can prove that  s = tan  W = mg  Without friction, the book will slide down the ramp. If it stays in place, there is sufficient static friction holding it there.

11 Static friction on a ramp Physics N surface fsfs f s = mgsin  and N = mgcos  At maximum angle before the book slides, we can prove that  s = tan  W = mg   F = 0 W x = f s mgsin  =  s mgcos   s = sin  cos  = tan  Assume  is maximum angle for which book stays in place. x  WxWx

12 Kinetic Friction This type of friction occurs between surfaces that are slipping past each other. f k =  k N  f k : kinetic frictional force (N)   k : coefficient of kinetic friction  N: normal force (N) Kinetic friction (sliding friction) is generally less than static friction (motionless friction) for most surfaces.

13 Sample Problem A 10-kg box rests on a ramp that is laying flat. The coefficient of static friction is 0.50, and the coefficient of kinetic friction is a) What is the maximum horizontal force that can be applied to the box before it begins to slide? b) What force is necessary to keep the box sliding at constant velocity?

14 Sample Problem A 10-kg wooden box rests on a wooden ramp. The coefficient of static friction is 0.50, and the coefficient of kinetic friction is What is the friction force between the box and ramp if a) the ramp is at a 25 o angle? b) the ramp is at a 45 o angle? c) what is the acceleration of the box when the ramp is at 45 o ?

15 Strings

16 Tension Tension is a pulling force that arises when a rope, string, or other long thin material resists being pulled apart without stretching significantly. Tension always pulls away from a body attached to a rope or string and toward the center of the rope or string.

17 A physical picture of tension Imagine tension to be the internal force preventing a rope or string from being pulled apart. Tension as such arises from the center of the rope or string. It creates an equal and opposite force on objects attached to opposite ends of the rope or string. Copyright James Walker, “Physics”, 1 st ed.

18 Tension examples

19 Sample problem A. A 1,500 kg crate hangs motionless from a crane cable. What is the tension in the cable? Ignore the mass of the cable. B. Suppose the crane accelerates the crate upward at 1.2 m/s 2. What is the tension in the cable now?

20 Connected Objects

21 Sample problem A 5.0 kg object (m 1 ) is connected to a 10.0 kg object (m 2 ) by a string. If a pulling force F of 20 N is applied to the 5.0 kg object, A) what is the acceleration of the system? B) what is the tension in the string connecting the objects? (Assume a frictionless surface.)

22 Mass 1 (10 kg) rests on a frictionless table connected by a string to Mass 2 (5 kg). Find (a) the acceleration of each block. (b) the tension in the connecting string. Sample problem m1m1 m2m2

23 Mass 1 (10 kg) rests on a table connected by a string to Mass 2 (5 kg). Find the minimum coefficient of static friction for which the blocks remain stationary. Sample problem m1m1 m2m2

24 Mass 1 (10 kg) rests on a table connected by a string to Mass 2 (5 kg). If  s = 0.30 and  k = 0.20, what is (a) the acceleration of each block? (b) the tension in the connecting string? Sample problem m1m1 m2m2

25 Pulleys and Ramps Together

26 Sample problem Two blocks are connected by a string as shown in the figure. What is the acceleration, assuming there is no friction? 10 kg 5 kg  


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