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Advanced Videorecordings Cataloging Workshop

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Presentation on theme: "Advanced Videorecordings Cataloging Workshop"— Presentation transcript:

1 Advanced Videorecordings Cataloging Workshop
OLAC Macon, Georgia 2010 October 15-17 Jay Weitz Senior Consulting Database Specialist WorldCat Quality Management Division OCLC Online Computer Library Center Welcome Advanced Videorecordings Cataloging Workshop OLAC Conference Macon, Georgia 2010 October 15-17

2 Not comprehensive Trying to be practical Introduction AACR2 MARC
Visual Materials Trying to be practical Introduction Workshop not meant to be comprehensive · Assumes basic knowledge of AACR2 and MARC · At least a general awareness of AV Cataloging and the OCLC Visual Materials format · Will not try to re-create the findings or reargue the issues of the Working Group on Bibliographic Control of Music Video Material, although these will be referred to · Can jump around a lot, concentrating on areas that have proven to be problems; that have generated questions, calls, letters, ; that have caused confusion Trying to be practical -- To help those cataloging music videos on a regular or occasional basis · Will try to avoid the (admittedly interesting) philosophical issues of main entry, manifestations of musical works, etc.. I understand that most participants catalog music scores and CDs according to AACR2 and more than half are from OCLC member libraries, but do not have much experience with videorecordings.

3 Introduction Type of Date and Dates
538 Field: Color Broadcast System, Region Information, Aspect Ratio Captioning, Subtitling, Audio Enhancement Statements of Responsibility Numbers: 028 Field, 037 Field, 020 Field, 024 Field Genre/Form Headings Streaming Media Series and Dependent Titles Locally Made Videorecordings Type of Date and Dates 538 Field: Color Broadcast System, Region Information, Aspect Ratio Captioning, Subtitling, Audio Enhancement Statements of Responsibility Numbers: 028 Field, 037 Field, 020 Field, 024 Field Genre/Form Headings Streaming Media Series and Dependent Titles Locally Made Videorecordings

4 Type of Date and Dates Different Date Sources:
Video image (opening and/or closing credits) Disc label Container Accompanying material Different Bibliographic “Events”: Original production Release as motion picture Release as an earlier video format Release as a videodisc Copyrights of design or accompanying material Type of Date and Dates Dates are often the hardest piece of information to determine, especially for Visual Materials · The item itself often has different sources for dates: Video image (opening and/or closing credits) Disc label Container Accompanying material · Associated with the item may be dates for different bibliographic “events”: Original production Release as motion picture Release as an earlier video format Release as a videodisc Copyrights of design or accompanying material In the U.S., we often find that video publishers redesign the container packaging, which often results in a new copyright date on that packaging (these dates are often marked "Package Design" or something like that). This date has no bibliographic significance and should usually be ignored. Think of it as the equivalent of a redesigned cover for a paperback book when the inside has not changed.

5 Type of Date and Dates Dates from the chief source (video image itself, cassette label, DVD label) are important, but other factors must be considered: U-matic cassettes: 1971 Beta cassettes: May 1975 VHS cassettes: September 1977 CAV laser optical discs: 1978 CLV laser optical discs: 1978 CED video discs: 1981 DVD discs: introduced March 1997 in U.S. (late 1996 in Japan) Dates for videos earlier than those obviously cannot be considered “publication” dates A later date from a unifying element such as container may be more important Such a later date may be used to infer a date of publication Account for other important dates in notes Type of Date and Dates Dates from the chief source (video image itself, cassette label) are generally the most important, but other factors must be considered U-matic cassettes: 1971 Betamax machines were first sold in May 1975 VHS machines were first sold in September 1977 CAV laser optical discs: 1978 CLV laser optical discs: 1978 CED video discs: 1981 DVD discs: introduced March 1997 in U.S. (late 1996 in Japan) Dates for DVD-Videos earlier than that obviously cannot be considered “publication” dates, including but not limited to copyright dates of older films that appear in credits A later date from a unifying element such as container or accompanying material may be more important Such a later date may be used to infer a date of publication as DVD-Video; in the complete absence of any other usable date, a package design date may be used to infer a date of publication Account for other important dates in notes

6 Type of Date and Dates Relatively unadorned releases of the original motion picture: Type of Date/Publication Status (008/06, DtSt): p Date 1 (008/07-10): publication date of the DVD-Video Date 2 (008/11-14): date of the original theatrical release DVD-Video releases with substantial new or extra material: Type of Date/Publication Status (008/06, DtSt): s Date 2 (008/11-14): blank Such substantial new or extra material might include: documentary material (“making-of”, interviews, biographies, etc.) multiple versions or cuts (director’s cut, alternate endings, restored scenes, both widescreen and pan-and-scan on same disc) Use judgment about what and how much new material qualifies as substantial Always include a note about date of original release in either case Originally released as a motion picture in 1999. Type of Date and Dates We’ve mentioned the large capacity of DVD-Videos for material in addition to, say, just the original theatrical film. The presence or absence of such extra materials will help determine how we code the Type of Date/Publication Status (008/06, DtSt) and the Date 1 (008/07-10) and Date 2 (008/11-14) fixed fields. Consider items that are relatively unadorned releases of the original motion picture, etc., to be Type of Date code “p” with Date 1 as the publication date of the DVD-Video and the date of the original release in Date 2. Consider items with substantial new or extra material as Type of Date code “s”, that is, as entirely new works. Date 1 would be the publication date of the DVD-Video, and Date 2 would remain blank. Such material might include: documentary material (“making-of”, interviews, biographies, etc.) trailers outtakes audio commentary tracks quizzes, games, trivia multiple versions or cuts (director’s cut, alternate endings, restored scenes, both widescreen and pan-and-scan on same disc) Use judgment about what and how much new material qualifies as “substantial.” Include a note about date of original release in either case. Originally released as a motion picture in 1999.

7 Type of Date and Dates Release of a work with identical content in a different medium (for instance a film released on video) is not considered a “re-release” 008/06 (Type of Date/Publication Status: DtSt) Use Date Type “p” rather than “r” Type of Date and Dates For purposes of coding Date Type, the release of a work with identical content in a different medium, for instance a film released on video, is not considered a “re-release” (Use Date Type “p” rather than “r”) Evidence of re-release for motion pictures and videos. A re-release can be identified as follows: The graphic representation, form, content or subject content is essentially the same as the original issue. The change is from one film size to another (e.g., 35 mm. to 16 mm.). The change is from one medium for sound to another. The item has been issued as a single and also in a series without any changes other than the preceding. Do not use code r for the following motion pictures and videos: A change in language or addition of subtitles in a language other than that of the sound track. A change from silent to sound or vice versa. A change from black-and-white to color or vice versa. A change from still to motion or vice versa. A change in the purpose of the film (e.g., released for educational purposes) when editing reflects that change in purpose. A change in running time from shorter to longer or vice versa. A change in form (e.g., a motion picture re-released as a videorecording).

8 538 Field 538: System Details Note
Videorecording system (DVD, Blu-ray disc, etc.) Color broadcast system Region Aspect ratio Sound characteristics DVD; PAL; Region 4; widescreen version (16:9); Dolby digital 5.1 surround sound or stereo. surround sound. 538 Field 538: System Details Note Visual Materials community has taken advantage of provision in 7.7B that allows us to “give a particular note first when it has been determined that note is of primary importance.” AACR2 and LCRIs offer little guidance on how to word, order, or punctuate this note. There is no standard method, and in some cases (depending upon complexity of data), it might be more appropriate to put some data in separate 5XX fields. In most common cases, however, a single field, worded as clearly and succinctly as possible. My suggestion for punctuation is semicolon-space between elements, but use common sense and strive for clarity. One (but hardly the only) logical order would be: Videorecording system (DVD, Blu-ray disc, etc.): Usually pretty standard. Color broadcast system: NTSC, PAL, SECAM, ATSC Region Aspect ratio: widescreen, letterboxed, full screen, etc. Sound characteristics: mono./stereo., Dolby, etc. 538 DVD; PAL; Region 4; widescreen version (16:9); Dolby digital 5.1 surround sound or stereo. surround sound. We’ll deal with some of these in more detail.

9 538 Field: Color Broadcast System
NTSC (National Television Systems Committee) Used in US, Canada, Mexico, Japan, a few other places 525 horizontal lines PAL (Phase Alternation Line) Used in most of Western Europe (except France); China; India; Australia; New Zealand; parts of Africa, Asia, and South America Developed in Germany 625 horizontal lines SECAM (Séquential Couleur à Mémoire) Used in France, Russia, Eastern Europe, Francophone Africa, Middle East Developed in France ATSC (Advanced Television Systems Committee) Used in U.S., Mexico, Canada, South Korea, various other places Digital format replaced NTSC on 2009 June 12 Supports various image sizes 538 Field: Color Broadcast System In our increasingly global cataloging world, I’d now recommend always indicating the color broadcast system when the resource identifies it. In most cases, simply place it right after “DVD” (following a comma or semi-colon). There are three widespread systems and one emerging system: NTSC (National Television Systems Committee) Used in US, Canada, Mexico, Japan, a few other places 525 horizontal lines “Never Twice the Same Color” PAL (Phase Alternation Line) Used in most of Western Europe (except France); China; India; Australia; New Zealand; parts of Africa, Asia, and South America Developed in Germany 625 horizontal lines “People Are Lavender”; “Picture Always Lousy” SECAM (Séquential Couleur à Mémoire) Used in France, Russia, Eastern Europe, Francophone Africa, Middle East Developed in France “System Entirely Contrary to American Method” ATSC (Advanced Television Systems Committee) Used in U.S., Mexico, Canada, South Korea, various other places Digital format replaced NTSC on 2009 June 12 Supports various image sizes Too new to have a comical designation, sorry (“Ask The Swedish Chef”) [Joke designations courtesy of Marc Richard, McGill University] Actually, there are at least four other emerging digital systems used elsewhere (DVB/T [Europe, Russia, Australia], ISDB/T [Japan], SBTVD [Brazil, Peru], and DMB-T/H [China]). Don’t even ask.

10 538 Field: Region Information
Regional restrictions indicated by code number superimposed on globe 0. All-region or multi-region 1. U.S., Canada, U.S. Territories 2. Japan, Europe, South Africa, and Middle East (including Egypt) 3. Southeast Asia and East Asia (including Hong Kong) 4. Australia, New Zealand, Pacific Islands, Central America, Mexico, South America, and the Caribbean 5. Eastern Europe (Former Soviet Union), Indian subcontinent, Africa, North Korea, and Mongolia 6. China 7. Reserved 8. Special international venues (airplanes, cruise ships, etc.) 538 Field: Region Information Many DVDs (and DVD players) include an indication that they will play only in a certain region or regions. This is represented by the region number(s) superimposed on a world globe. 0. All-region or multi-region 1. U.S., Canada, U.S. Territories 2. Japan, Europe, South Africa, and Middle East (including Egypt) 3. Southeast Asia and East Asia (including Hong Kong) 4. Australia, New Zealand, Pacific Islands, Central America, Mexico, South America, and the Caribbean 5. Eastern Europe (Former Soviet Union), Indian subcontinent, Africa, North Korea, and Mongolia 6. China 7. Reserved 8. Special international venues (airplanes, cruise ships, etc.) Use field 538 to record any such regional restrictions.

11 Horizontal Width of Image: Vertical Height of Image
538 Field: Aspect Ratio Aspect Ratio Horizontal Width of Image: Vertical Height of Image Often expressed as XX:1 or as XX:XX 538 Field: Aspect Ratio “Aspect ratio” is ratio of horizontal width to vertical height of the film/video image. When expressed as XX:1, the smaller the number to the left of the colon, the more square the image (as with most older traditional TVs); the larger the number to the left, the wider the image (as with most motion picture screens and, increasingly, newer widescreen televisions). Aspect ratio can also be expressed in its “unreduced” form, where 4:3 = 1.33:1 and 16:9 = 1.78:1. You can do the math. Over the history of motion pictures, at least 18 different aspect ratios have been used, a few of them for only one or a small number of particular films. Roughly a half dozen have evolved into sort-of standards in various geographical areas; in various film, video, and/or broadcast media; and/or for various purposes. One reason that catalogers care at all about aspect ratio is that the difference between the size of an original film image and the size of the television on which a videorecording is shown often results in different versions of the same video resource, what we have commonly called “letterboxed” and “standard” versions.

12 538 Field: Aspect Ratio Identifying Letterboxed Versions
Aspect ratio 1.5:1 and larger (commonly 1.66:1, 1.78:1, 1.85:1) Also called “Wide screen” or “Widescreen” Identifying “Standard” Versions Aspect ratio smaller than 1.5:1 (commonly 1.33:1, sometimes expressed as 4:3) Also called “Pan and Scan” or “Full screen” “Formatted to fit your TV screen” 538 Field: Aspect Ratio "Letterboxing" is a technique used in video publishing to fit the wide rectangle of a motion picture image into the much more square space of a TV screen. This usually means reducing the size of a video image so that the entire horizontal span fits onto the video screen, leaving black horizontal bands above and below the image. It's ugly but retains the integrity of the image. There’s also a less common technique called “pillarboxing” (“reverse letterboxing”) where there are black bands on the sides of the image. It is used when an image not intended for a wide screen is shown on a wide screen. Some early sound films were even more narrow than 4:3 because they had to accommodate the sound-on-film track. Furthermore, there is also “windowboxing,” where both letterboxing and pillarboxing are used. Shadowboxing is a different story. Identifying Letterboxed Versions Aspect ratio 1.5:1 and larger (commonly 1.66:1, 1.78:1, 1.85:1) Sometimes expressed as 5:3 (1.66:1) or 16:9 (1.78:1) Also called “Wide screen” or “Widescreen” Identifying “Standard” Versions Aspect ratio smaller than 1.5:1 (commonly 1.33:1, sometimes expressed as 4:3) Also called “Pan and Scan” or “Full screen” ”Formatted to fit your TV screen” In either case, the numeric aspect ratio may or may not be present, but if it is, it’s wise to include it. Another term you will often see is “anamorphic,” where the image is digitally manipulated to compress or stretch it to fit a display format. Such notes as “Enhanced for widescreen TVs” also usually indicate anamorphic manipulation. It’s a good idea to include this if it’s indicated.

13 538 Field: Aspect Ratio Options for aspect ratio: Separate 500 note
500 Aspect ratio 1.33:1; formatted from the original version to fit the television screen. Combine aspect ratio details with 538 System requirements note 538 DVD; NTSC; Region 1; widescreen (2.4:1) presentation; Dolby digital 5.1 surround. Presented as edition statement 250 Pan and scan ed. 250 Widescreen version. 538 Field: Aspect Ratio Options for aspect ratio: Separate 500 note 500 Aspect ratio 1.33:1; formatted from the original version to fit the television screen. Quoted notes are also good, when appropriate. Combine aspect ratio details with 538 System requirements note 538 DVD; NTSC; Region 1; widescreen (2.4:1) presentation; Dolby digital 5.1 surround. Include in 538 when data is relatively simple to convey and the resulting note is clear. Presented as edition statement: 250 Pan and scan ed. 250 Widescreen version. Definitely use 250 when presented as an edition statement; use judgment in more ambiguous cases.

14 Captioning, Subtitling, Audio Enhancement
Captions traditionally: Were accessible only with special equipment; with DVDs, it’s now usually just another menu choice Were intended for those unable to hear audio; now also commonly used in noisy places such as bars and restaurants Included non-textual data: identification of speakers, indications of laughter, applause, nonverbal sounds, sound effects Tended toward verbatim transcription; often using rolling text bars, non-proportional fonts against black background, usually the same language as that being spoken Captioning, Subtitling, Audio Enhancement Closed Captions and subtitles have TRADITIONALLY had different technologies and different intentions. With the advent of DVDs especially, the array of captioning and subtitling possibilities have blossomed, and these differences have blurred but may still be useful in telling the difference. Captions traditionally: Were accessible only with special equipment; with DVDs, it’s now usually just another menu choice Were intended for those unable to hear audio; now also commonly used in noisy places such as bars and restaurants Included non-textual data: identification of speakers, indications of laughter, applause, nonverbal sounds, sound effects, etc. Tended toward verbatim transcription; often using rolling text bars, non-proportional fonts against black background, usually the same language as that being spoken The “Closed” in Closed Captioning referred to the fact that it once required special decoding equipment for the captions to be seen; that is no longer the case. Closed Captioning is usually indicated either with those words or some graphic symbol. Among the common symbols are: “CC” symbol “Accented TV” symbol National Film Board of Canada’s stylized ear with diagonal line through it

15 Captioning, Subtitling, Audio Enhancement
Subtitles traditionally: Were accessible without special equipment; with DVDs, they are now usually just another menu choice Were intended for those who can hear audio Do not include non-textual data Tend toward a condensed essence of text; not usually a word-for-word translation Captioning, Subtitling, Audio Enhancement Subtitles traditionally: Were accessible without special equipment; with DVDs, they are now usually just another menu choice Were intended for those who can hear audio Did not include non-textual data (such as indications of the presence of music, laughter, applause, sound effects, etc.) Tended toward a condensed essence of text; not usually a word-for-word verbatim translation; often leaving obvious passages (yes/no exchanges, shouts of a character’s name, etc.) untranslated

16 Captioning, Subtitling, Audio Enhancement
SDH: “Subtitles for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing” Combines features of traditional captions and traditional subtitles: Usually in proportional fonts and displayed (without black bars) in a fashion similar to traditional subtitles Hides less of the video image than captioning did with the black bars Includes non-textual cues and identification of speakers Subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing (SDH). Captioning, Subtitling, Audio Enhancement SDH: “Subtitles for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing” The phrase, the “SDH” abbreviation, and the SDH logo are all more recent innovations, introduced in the DVD era. SDH combines features of traditional captions and traditional subtitles: Usually in proportional fonts and displayed (without black bars) in a fashion similar to traditional subtitles Hides less of the video image than captioning did with the black bars Includes non-textual cues and identification of speakers Subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing (SDH).

17 Captioning, Subtitling, Audio Enhancement
Audio Enhancement: Audio description of videos for the visually impaired Scenery Action Costumes Gestures Other visual elements Voiceovers that do not interfere with existing dialog Audio-described. Captioning, Subtitling, Audio Enhancement Audio Enhancement is the generic term for audio description of videos for the visually impaired. Important visual elements such as scenery, action, costumes, gestures, and other visual elements are described in a voiceover so as not to interfere with existing dialog. With DVD and Blu-ray Disc technologies, this audio enhancement can simply be yet another language choice. On the right is one of the logos for Descriptive Video Service, although there are others of similar services. Audio-described.

18 Captioning, Subtitling, Audio Enhancement
Publishers often provide: Data chart/grid on back of container Option menu when disc begins 008/35-37: eng eng ǂa fre ǂj eng ǂj fre ǂh eng 546 In English, with dubbed French, and optional subtitles in English or French. Captioning, Subtitling, Audio Enhancement On videodiscs, language options of all these types plus others are often helpfully spelled out in a chart or grid provided by the publisher, usually on the back of the container. Publishers also provide a menu when you view the disc. Sometimes the information on the container and the information in the menu even agree. Sometimes one or the other or both are even correct. It’s best not to take any of the language options as truth without checking them out in reality, if that’s possible. Try to be as accurate, concise, and clear in your description of the available options as you can in a 546 or other appropriate note. To assist both users and other catalogers, you might also note any discrepancies between what the publisher says and what is reality. 008/35-37: eng Main content is English eng ǂa fre ǂj eng ǂj fre ǂh eng First Indicator “1” because translation is involved Subfields $a for the two spoken languages Subfields $j -- to be valid with the OCLC-MARC Update scheduled for implementation in August for subtitled languages Subfield $h for the original language 546 English or French soundtracks with optional English or French subtitles; closed-captioned in English.

19 Statements of Responsibility
For moving images, various types of statements of responsibility are commonly distributed over at least three fields: 245 Subfield $c (Statement of responsibility, etc.) 508 (Creation/Production Credits Note) 511 (Participant or Performer Note) Use of 511 for “participants, players, narrators, presenters, or performers” fairly straightforward Generally, a film’s “cast” Statements of Responsibility For moving images, various types of statements of responsibility are commonly distributed over at least three fields: 245 Subfield $c (Statement of responsibility, etc.) 508 (Creation/Production Credits Note) 511 (Participant or Performer Note) Use of 511 for “participants, players, narrators, presenters, or performers” fairly straightforward. Generally, a film’s “cast”

20 Statements of Responsibility
Field 245 Subfield $c Record those with “some degree of overall responsibility” Producers Directors Writers Statements of Responsibility Deciding between placement in statement of responsibility (245 subfield $c) or credits note (508) can be more involved. · Those with “some degree of overall responsibility” go in 245 subfield $c producers directors writers That wording comes from LCRI 7.1F1, which was cancelled in 2001, but is still useful to explain the spirit of what remains in AACR2 7.1F1: “Transcribe statements of responsibility relating to those persons or bodies credited in the chief source of information with a major role in creating a film (e.g., as producer, director, animator) as instructed in 1.1F. Give all other statements of responsibility (including those relating to performance) in notes.”

21 Statements of Responsibility
Don’t agonize over making exceptions for inclusion in 245 subfield $c, especially when the responsibility is important in relation to the content of the work Performer starring in a performance video, despite responsibility being limited to performance Composer in a music video Choreographer in a video of choreography Chief animator for animated film Statements of Responsibility Don’t agonize over making exceptions for inclusion in 245 subfield $c, especially when the responsibility is important in relation to the content of the work. Examples: Performer or group starring in a performance video, despite responsibility being limited to performance Composer in a classical music video Choreographer in a video of choreography Chief animator for animated film

22 Statements of Responsibility
Those responsible for only one segment or aspect of the work go in field 508: Photographers Cinematographers Animators Artists, illustrators Film editors Music/composers Consultants, advisers Statements of Responsibility Otherwise, those responsible for only one segment or aspect of the work go in field 508 photographers cinematographers animators artists, illustrators film editors music/composers consultants, advisers AACR2 LCRI 7.7B6: This LCRI has also been cancelled and refers to the reworded text of Rule 7.1F1. In this case also, much of the guidance in the cancelled LCRI remains solid and useful.

23 Statements of Responsibility: Relation to Added Entries
Follow LCRI 21.29D “Make added entries for all openly named persons or corporate bodies who have contributed to the creation of the item” (producers, directors, writers), except: Don’t make added entries for persons if there is a production company with an added entry, unless person’s contributions are significant If a person is the main entry, don’t trace other persons unless their contributions are known to be significant Statements of Responsibility How is this reflected in added entries? Follow LCRI 21.29D · “Make added entries for all openly named persons or corporate bodies who have contributed to the creation of the item” (producers, directors, writers), except: Don’t make added entries for persons if there is a production company with an added entry, unless the contributions are significant (animator for animated film, director of theatrical film, prominently named [“a film by ...”], etc.) My suspicion has long been that this restriction dates from the days before videorecordings (either tape or disc) were widely available, when most material cataloged by libraries was educational (rather than theatrical films). For educational films, etc., production companies were commonly known (e.g., Warren Schloat Productions), whereas the in-house directors, writers, and producers were not. For theatrical films, users need access both to those prominent individuals and to often well known production companies (Spike Lee's "40 Acres and a Mule Filmworks," Michael Moore's "Dog Eat Dog Films"). If a person is the main entry, don’t trace other persons unless their contributions are known to be significant (joint responsibility, collaboration, etc.)

24 Statements of Responsibility: Relation to Added Entries
“Make added entry headings for all corporate bodies named in the publication, distribution, etc. area” “Make added entries for all featured players, performers, and narrators,” except: If main entry is for a performing group, don’t trace individuals in the group unless the name appears in conjunction with, preceding, or following the group name If there are many players, trace only the most prominent Make added entries for interviewers, interviewees, lecturers, etc. who are not the main entry Statements of Responsibility · “Make added entry headings for all corporate bodies named in the publication, distribution, etc. area” · “Make added entries for all featured players, performers, and narrators,” except: If main entry is for a performing group, don’t trace individuals in the group unless the name appears in conjunction with, preceding, or following the group name If there are many players, trace only the most prominent (judged by typography of name, size of role in opera, etc.; use judgment) · Make added entries for interviewers, interviewees, lecturers, etc. who are not the main entry CC:DA Task Force On Descriptive Rules Governing Producers Of Nonprint Materials (“Producers Task Force”) has considered various clarifications in definition of “producer” but things remain ambiguous

25 028 40 547 0264 $b Sony Music Entertainment
Numbers: 028 Field Publisher Number: Field 028 028 First Indicator 4: Videorecording Number 028 Second Indicator 0: No note, No added entry 1: Note, Added entry 2: Note, No added entry 3: No note, Added entry Numbers: 028 Field Since Format Integration, videorecording numbers go in field 028, with first indicator 4 · 028 field familiar to those who catalog Scores and Sound Recordings · Second indicator structure remains the same for generating notes and/or added entries ·Videorecording numbers are indexed in Publisher Number (mn: and mn= in Connexion) and Standard Number (sn: and sn=) indexes. From DVD container, note Videorecording Number on spine, as example. Video publisher name in subfield $b. $b Sony Music Entertainment $b Sony Music Entertainment

26 Numbers: 037 Field Source of Acquisition: Field 037 4000019891
Prior to Format Integration, videorecording numbers were placed in 037 Now use field 037 only for numbers such as distributor’s stock numbers Numbers: 037 Field · Prior to Format Integration in the mid-1990s, videorecording numbers were placed in 037, “Source of Acquisition” · Now use field 037 only for numbers such as distributor’s stock numbers Stock numbers are not permanently associated with the resource, but include numbers found on distributor’s stickers, in distributor’s catalogs, etc. $b Wal-Mart

27 Numbers: 020 Field ISBN-13: 978-0-9815714-3-0 ISBN-10: 0-9815714-3-3
International Standard Book Number: Field 020 ISBN-10: Ten digits in four elements separated by hyphens ISBN-13: Thirteen digits in five elements separated by hyphens ISBN-13 begins with either 978 or 9791 through 9799 Thirteen-digit numbers that begin with 9790 are new-style ISMNs Validate as EANs and are currently coded as such ISBNs regularly applied to videos Often labeled as ISBNs, but not always Numbers: 020 Field ISBNs (International Standard Book Numbers): In spite of their formal name, ISBNs are regularly applied to videos. Often labeled as ISBNs, but not always. ISBN and ISBN-13: Both go in field 020 ISBN-10: Ten digits in four elements separated by hyphens ISBN-13: Thirteen digits in five elements separated by hyphens ISBN-13 begins with either 978 or 9791 through 9799 Thirteen-digit numbers that begin with 9790 are new-style ISMNs Validate as EANs and are currently coded as such

28 Numbers: 024 Field Universal Product Code: Field 024, First Indicator 1 UPC: Twelve digits Includes as the first digit, “Number System Character” (NSC), which may appear outside and to the left of the bar code symbol Includes as the final (twelfth) character, the check digit, which may appear at the bottom right outside the bar code symbol Numbers: 024 Field Universal Product Code (UPC) goes in field 024, with first indicator “1” UPC has 12 digits Includes as the first digit, the “Number System Character,” (NSC), which may appear outside and to the left of the bar code symbol Includes as the final (twelfth) character, the check digit, which may appear at the bottom right outside the bar code symbol

29 Numbers: 024 Field International Article Number (EAN): Field 024, First Indicator 3 EAN: Thirteen digits Includes left-hand digit, often outside of bar code symbol EANs that are not ISBN-13s should continue to be coded in field 024, first indicator “3” ISBN-13s have 978 or 9791 through 9799 as first digits Thirteen-digit numbers that begin with 9790 are actually new-style ISMNs Validate as EANs and are currently coded as such Numbers: 024 Field International Article Number (EAN): Field 024, First Indicator 3 EAN: Thirteen digits. Includes left-hand digit, often outside of bar code symbol EANs that are not ISBN-13s should continue to be coded in field 024, first indicator “3” ISBN-13s have 978 or 9791 through 9799 as first digits Thirteen-digit numbers that begin with 9790 are actually new-style ISMNs Validate as EANs and are currently coded as such When the new ISMN standard is actually approved and implemented, OCLC should be able to convert these ISMNs to correct First Indicator (2) and adjust validation

30 Numbers: 024 Field Global Trade Item Numbers (GTIN-14): Field 024, First Indicator 7, Subfield $2 gtin-14 GTIN-14: Fourteen digits These currently often look much like UPCs with zeros in front Numbers: 024 Field Global Trade Item Numbers (GTIN-14): 024 First Indicator 7, subfield $2 coded gtin-14. GTIN-14: Fourteen digits These currently often look much like UPCs with zeros in front $2 gtin-14

31 Numbers: 024 Field Supplemental Code 024 1 042100005264 $d 12345
Supplemental codes: Field 024, Subfield $d Additional codes following the standard number or code Any optional digits carried to the right of the number or code, such as digits provided to identify price, title, or issue information All numbers in 024 are entered without hyphens or spaces Supplemental Code Numbers: Field Supplemental codes: 024 Subfield $d Additional codes following the standard number or code Any optional digits carried to the right of the number or code, such as digits provided to identify price, title, or issue information All numbers in 024 are entered in bibliographic records without hyphens or spaces $d 12345

32 Genre/Form Headings Genre Form
Field 655 contains terms from standard lists that indicate the genre and/or form of the materials being described Genre A category of works characterized by recognizable conventions (themes, plot formulas, character-types, settings, situations) Disaster films sh Film noir sh Science fiction films sh Form A characteristic of works with a particular format and/or purpose Documentary films sh Made-for-TV movies sh Short films sh Genre/Form Headings Field 655 contains terms from standard lists that indicate the genre and/or form of the materials being described Form is defined as: A characteristic of works with a particular format and/or purpose Documentary films sh Made-for-TV movies Sh Short films sh Genre is defined as: A category of works characterized by recognizable conventions (themes, plot formulas, character-types, settings, situations) Disaster films sh Film noir sh Science fiction films sh

33 Genre/Form Headings LC’s Moving Image Materials: Genre Terms (MIM) by Martha M. Yee (1988) Was the standard print list for film and video materials Superseded by LC’s Moving Image Genre-Form Guide (MIGFG) by Brian Taves, Judi Hoffman, and Karen Lund (1998) Web document address: LC began issuing 155 authority records for moving image genre/form headings in 2007 Moving Image Genre/Form Headings, Subject Headings Manual H 1913 LC announced Library of Congress Genre/Form Terms for Library and Archival Materials (LCGFT) in June 2010 “Library of Congress to Formally Separate LC Genre/Form Thesaurus from LCSH” (http://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/genreformthesaurus.html) Genre/Form Headings LC’s Moving Image Materials: Genre Terms (affectionately known as “MIM”) by Martha M. Yee (1988) was the standard print list for film and video materials through the 1990s. LC’s Moving Image Genre-Form Guide (affectionately known as “MIGFG”) (1998) superseded Yee’s work; available on Web at LC began issuing 155 authority records for moving image genre/form headings in 2007. Moving Image Genre/Form Headings, Subject Headings Manual H 1913 (http://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/h1913.pdf). LC announced Library of Congress Genre/Form Terms for Library and Archival Materials (affectionately known as “LickGift”) in June 2010, a thesaurus that is identified by its own subfield $2 code (lcgft) and that will eventually be independent of LCSH. LC also plans to cancel all genre/form heading records currently identified with the “sh” prefix and replace them with records identified with the new “gf” prefix (late 2010, early 2011). You can read about LC’s plans at LC’s policies are still evolving. Be sure to pay attention to continuing developments.

34 Genre/Form Headings Moving Image Genre/Form Headings, SHM H 1913 (http://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/h1913.pdf) Assign genre/form headings to both fiction and nonfiction works Assign one of the following headings to distinguish: Fiction films (sh ) Nonfiction films (sh ) Fiction television programs (sh ) Nonfiction television programs (sh ) Assign one, as appropriate: Short films (sh ): running time less than 40 minutes Feature films (sh ): running time of 40 minutes or more Genre/Form Headings The advice to keep abreast of LC’s evolving policies being said, here is a distillation of the current guidelines on using LC genre/form headings, as outlined in the Subject Headings Manual “Moving Image Genre/Form Headings” H 1913 (http://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/h1913.pdf): Assign genre/form headings to both fiction and nonfiction works Assign one of the following headings to distinguish fiction from nonfiction: Fiction films (sh ) Nonfiction films (sh ) Fiction television programs (sh ) Nonfiction television programs (sh ) “Films refers to works that are originally recorded and released on motion picture film, on video, or digitally. “ “Television programs refers to those works that are originally telecast.” Genre/form headings generally maintain this distinction, with some exceptions. Assign one, as appropriate: Short films (sh ): running time less than 40 minutes Feature films (sh ): running time of 40 minutes or more Remember that the Authority LCCNs will be changing soon.

35 Genre/Form Headings Assign as many genre/form headings as necessary to bring out important forms and genres to which the work belongs Assign, when appropriate, genre/form headings for people with disabilities: Hearing impaired: Assign one to all moving-image works produced with captions or sign language for viewing by the hearing impaired: Films for the hearing impaired (sh ) Television programs for the hearing impaired (sh ) Video recordings for the hearing impaired (sh ) Visually impaired: Assign one to all moving-image works with additional audio description provided for people with visual disabilities: Films for people with visual disabilities (sh ) Television programs for people with visual disabilities (sh ) Video recordings for people with visual disabilities (sh ) Genre/Form Headings Assign as many genre/form headings as necessary to bring out important forms and genres to which the work belongs The example in H 1913 is The Wizard of Oz, to which such genre terms as “Musical films”, “Fantasy films”, “Children’s films”, “Film adaptations”, “Fiction films”, and “Feature films” all apply. Assign, when appropriate, genre/form headings for people with disabilities: Hearing impaired: Assign one to all moving-image works produced with captions or sign language for viewing by the hearing impaired: Films for the hearing impaired (sh ) Television programs for the hearing impaired (sh ) Video recordings for the hearing impaired (sh ) Visually impaired: Assign one to all moving-image works with additional audio description provided for people with visual disabilities: Films for people with visual disabilities (sh ) Television programs for people with visual disabilities (sh ) Video recordings for people with visual disabilities (sh ) The two “Video recordings” headings are exceptions (for historical reasons) to the usual Film/TV dichotomy. They may be used locally instead of, or in addition to, the Film/TV headings. LC had cancelled these two long-used headings, faced a barrage of criticism, then reinstated them.

36 Genre/Form Headings LDR czn 001 oca ∎ anannbabn ∎a ana sh DLC ǂb eng ǂc DLC ǂd DLC 155 Television adaptations 455 Adaptations, Television 555 Television programs ǂw g 670 Moving image genre-form guide online, August 20, 2007: ǂb (Adaptation: fiction or nonfiction work taken from a work already existing in another medium, such as a book, short story, comic strip, radio program, or play) 670 Yee, Martha M. Moving image materials : genre terms, 1988: ǂb p. 25 (Adaptations: use for a work which has been created by the modification of another work in order to transpose it from one medium to another) 670 LCSH, Aug. 20, 2007: ǂb (hdg.: Television adaptations) Genre/Form Headings Sample moving image 155 authority record for “Television adaptations”: 155 field: Established genre/form heading. 455 fields: “See from” references“ (“use for” terms). 555 fields: “See also from” references (broader or related terms); “g” code is “broader term”. 6XX fields: Notes, source citations. In Connexion, genre/form headings can be searched and/or browsed in Genre (ge:) index. For now, they are also in the LCSH (su:) index, but all X55 fields will be removed from su: when they become “gf” headings. Note that all of the deleted “sh” prefix LCCNs will be retained in authority record 010 subfields $z.

37 Genre/Form Headings In bibliographic records, 655 Second Indicator “7” says that the source of the genre/form heading is specified in subfield $2: Code for Moving Image Materials: mim Code for Moving Image Genre-Form Guide: migfg Code for Library of Congress Genre/Form Terms for Library and Archival Materials: lcgft Thesauri with Second Indicators defined in other 6XX fields should use those codes: 1: LC Subject Headings for Children’s Literature 2: Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Genre/Form Headings In bibliographic records, 655 Second Indicator “7” indicates that the source of the heading is specified in subfield $2: Code for Moving Image Materials is “mim”. Code for Moving Image Genre-Form Guide is “migfg”. Code for LCGFT id “lcgft”. In bibliographic records, genre/form headings fields with Second Indicator 0 -- can currently be controlled in Connexion. When genre/form headings from LCGFT – 655 fields with Second Indicator 7 and subfield $2 lcgft – are in the authority file, you will be able to control them There will eventually be no genre/form headings in LCSH, but for thesauri with Second Indicators defined in other 6XX fields, you should use those indicators; the most common: 1: LC Subject Headings for Children’s Literature 2: Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)

38 Streaming Media Internet data transfer technique that allows the user immediately to hear audio files, and to hear and see video files, without lengthy download times before playback. The host or source "streams" small packets of information over the Internet to the user, who can access the content as it is received. Those temporary files are gone once the playback is complete. Streaming Media An Internet data transfer technique that allows the user immediately to hear audio files, and to hear and see video files, without lengthy download times before playback. The host or source "streams" small packets of information over the Internet to the user, who can access the content as it is received. Those temporary files are not stored on your computer once the playback is complete. Minimizes time required for listening/viewing Minimizes need for data storage space Allows access of live events in real time On the right are the logos for several common streaming media players.

39 Streaming Media: Not Streaming media will never be on a tangible medium (such as disc, cassette, etc.). To distinguish different types of remotely-accessed resources, non-streaming files are generally those downloaded from the Internet to reside on a local hard drive. Some characteristics: File is downloaded in its entirety Playback cannot begin until complete file is downloaded to local system Playback is not in “real time” Playback does not require a persistent connection to a remote server User has access to downloaded content after its initial playback User will often have ability to manipulate or edit content, “burn” it onto a tangible medium, etc. Streaming Media: Not Streaming files should not be confused with “steaming files,” which would be hot to the touch. But seriously, the obvious exclusion from the category of streaming media is any file distributed on a tangible medium (such as disc, cassette, etc.). As to remotely-accessed resources, non-streaming files are generally those downloaded from the Internet to reside on a local hard drive. Some characteristics: File is downloaded in its entirety Playback cannot begin until complete file is downloaded to local system Playback is not in “real time” Playback does not require a persistent connection to a remote server User has access to downloaded content after its initial playback User will often have ability to manipulate or edit content, “burn” it onto a tangible medium, etc.

40 Streaming Media: History
Streaming technology developed during the mid-1990s but initially had extremely limited availability. RealPlayer (RealAudio Player) introduced in April 1995 supported streaming media Predecessor of Windows Media Player first supported streaming in May 1996 Apple’s QuickTime 4.0, released in June 1999, was the first version to support streaming technology iTunes player, released in January 2001, supported streaming For most practical purposes, what we know today as streaming media became available to the general market in 1999 It would be extremely rare for any streaming audio file or streaming video file to have a publication date earlier than 1999 Streaming Media: History Streaming technology developed during the mid-1990s ( ), but initially had extremely limited availability. The first version of RealPlayer, then known as RealAudio Player, was introduced in April 1995 and supported streaming media. What is now known as Windows Media Player first supported streaming in May 1996. Apple’s QuickTime 4.0, released on June 8, 1999, was the first version to support streaming technology. The first version of the iTunes player, released in January 2001, supported streaming. For most practical purposes, what we know today as streaming media became widely available to the general market in 1999, so -- It would be extremely rare for any streaming audio file or streaming video file to have a publication date earlier than 1999 For streaming video, use the same Type of Date and Dates guidelines as for DVD-Video, with the extra consideration of a publication date before 1999 being unlikely.

41 Streaming Media: Streaming Video
Type (Type of Record; Leader/06): g (Projected medium) TMat (Type of Material; VIS 008/33): v (Videorecording) Form (Form of Item; Visual Materials 008/29): o (Online) 006 Computer File 006 006/00 Form of material (Type): m (Computer file/Electronic resource) 006/09 Type of computer file (File): c (Representational) 245 GMD: $h [electronic resource] 300 Physical description SMD: $a streaming video file 1 online resource (1 streaming video file) … Duration: Include for a single work, if stated or ascertainable, in the form: (XX hr., XX min., XX sec.) Other physical details: $b digital Type of file: “[type of] file” (i.e., MOV file) Other physical details: $b sound characteristics, color/b&w Streaming Media: Streaming Video Type (Type of Record; Leader/06): g (Projected medium) TMat (Type of Material; VIS 008/33): v (Videorecording) Form (Form of Item; Visual Materials 008/29): o (Online) 006 Computer File 006 006/00 Form of material (Type): m (Computer file/Electronic resource) 006/09 Type of computer file (File): c (Representational) 245 GMD: $h [electronic resource] 300 Physical description: Task Force recommends following the option in AACR2 9.5A1, 9.3B3, 9.5C3, and subsequent rules to include a physical description for remotely accessed resources in most cases SMD: $a streaming video file As you may know, the Program for Cooperative Cataloging (PCC) has recently made available a set of BIBCO Standard Record (BSR) guidelines (replacing the Core Record Standards; as well as “Provider-Neutral E-Monograph MARC Record Guide” (http://www.loc.gov/catdir/pcc/bibco/PN-Guide.pdf). Also working on a sort of bridge document for non-book electronic resources. Final decisions are still in the near future (watch this space), but to be consistent with related standards, the following looks likely: 1 online resource (1 streaming video file) … Duration: Include for a single work, if stated or ascertainable, in the form: (XX hr., XX min., XX sec.) Other physical details: $b digital Type of file: “[type of] file” (i.e., MOV file) Suggest using the file extension as the identifier; such designations as “MOV file”, “AVI file”, “MPG file”, etc. (These are some of the more common kinds of video file formats.) Capitalize the identifiers Other physical details: $b sound characteristics (“sd.”), color/b&w

42 Streaming Media: Streaming Video: Video 007 Field
007/00 (Subfield $a): Category of material v = Videorecording 007/01 (subfield $b): Specific material designation z = Other 007/03 (Subfield $d): Color b = Black and white c = Multicolored 007/04 (Subfield $e): Videorecording format 007/05 (Subfield $f): Sound on medium or separate a = Sound on medium 007/06 (Subfield $g): Medium for sound z = Other 007/07 (Subfield $h): Dimensions u = Unknown 007/08 (Subfield $i): Configuration of playback channels k = Mixed m = Monaural q = Quadraphonic, multichannel, or surround s = Stereophonic u = Unknown (not stated) Streaming Media: Streaming Video: Video 007 Field Field 007, which records certain physical characteristics in coded form, was originally designed for machine manipulation and implemented in its current form in 1981 007/00 (Subfield $a): Category of material v = Videorecording 007/01 (subfield $b): Specific material designation z = Other 007/03 (Subfield $d): Color b = Black and white c = Multicolored 007/04 (Subfield $e): Videorecording format 007/05 (Subfield $f): Sound on medium or separate a = Sound on medium 007/06 (Subfield $g): Medium for sound 007/07 (Subfield $h): Dimensions u = Unknown 007/08 (Subfield $i): Configuration of playback channels k = Mixed m = Monaural q = Quadraphonic, multichannel, or surround s = Stereophonic u = Unknown (not stated) Base coding on a clear indication on the resource itself

43 Streaming Media: Streaming Video: COM 007 Field
007/00 (Subfield $a): Category of material c = Electronic resource 007/01 (subfield $b): Specific material designation r = Remote 007/03 (Subfield $d): Color b = Black and white c = Multicolored 007/04 (Subfield $e): Dimensions n = Not applicable 007/05 (Subfield $f): Sound a = Sound Streaming Media: Streaming Video: COM 007 Field 007/00 (Subfield $a): Category of material c = Electronic resource 007/01 (subfield $b): Specific material designation r = Remote 007/03 (Subfield $d): Color b = Black and white c = Multicolored 007/04 (Subfield $e): Dimensions n = Not applicable 007/05 (Subfield $f): Sound a = Sound You may omit the optional subfields $g, $h, $i, $j, $k, and $l.

44 Streaming Media: Streaming Video
m c v ǂb z ǂd c ǂe z ǂf a ǂg z ǂh u ǂi u c ǂb r ǂd c ǂe n ǂf a The common school, ǂh [electronic resource] / ǂc produced by Stone Lantern Films ; KCET. streaming video file (55 min.) : ǂb digital, WMA file, sd., col. online resource (1 streaming video file) (55 min.) : ǂb digital, WMA file, sd., col. System requirements: Windows Media and QuickTime software. Mode of access: World Wide Web. Title from web page (viewed on Sept. 26, 2006). ǂu ǂz View streaming video Streaming Media: Streaming Video m c For electronic resource aspect (File “c” for “representational”) v ǂb z ǂd c ǂe z ǂf a ǂg z ǂh u ǂi u For Videorecording aspect c ǂb r ǂd c ǂe n ǂf a For electronic resource aspect The common school, ǂh [electronic resource] / ǂc produced by Stone Lantern Films ; KCET. Note GMD streaming video file (55 min.) : ǂb digital, WMA file, sd., col. online resource (1 streaming video file) (55 min.) : ǂb digital, WMA file, sd., col. Note Duration and its format Note capitalized file type (extension) Note sound and color characteristics System requirements: Windows Media and QuickTime software. Streaming media software player (RealPlayer, Windows Media Player, etc.) Any other requirements (memory, operating system, modem speed, sound card, video card, browser, etc.) Mode of access: World Wide Web. Required for remotely accessed electronic resources (9.7B1c) Title from web page (viewed on Sept. 26, 2006). Source of title note required for electronic resources (9.7B3) Task Force recommends including the date of viewing (9.7B3 and 9.7B22) in this note if the title is transcribed from an updating Web page external to the streaming media; 9.7B22 requires the date of viewing for all remote access resources ǂu ǂz View streaming video URL for the remote resource; if possible, a direct link

45 Streaming Media: When to Omit 300 Field
When there are different versions of the same resource being cataloged on a single record, or an entire site that contains many resources being cataloged on a single record, omit physical description 300 field Resource is available as both a streaming file and a downloadable file on the same Web site Resource is available as different streaming versions (e.g., low vs. high bandwidth) in separate files on the same Web site Resource is an updating Web site that provides access to many streaming media files In these instances, include details in notes Streaming Media: When to Omit 300 Field (Physical Description) When the situation is too complex to be treated clearly and succinctly in the 300 field, particularly when there are different versions of the same resource being cataloged on a single record, or an entire site that contains many resources being cataloged on a single record, omit physical description 300 field. Instead, include these details in notes. Resource is available as both a streaming file and a downloadable file on the same Web site. Resource is available as different streaming versions (e.g., low vs. high bandwidth) in separate files on the same Web site. Resource is an updating Web site that provides access to many streaming media files. In this case, catalog the Web site according to the rules in AACR2 Chapters 9 and 12, rather than the individual streaming files. While one has the option of including a physical description (“1 Website”), it is not recommended as a best practice to include details about the individual streaming files in the 300 field.

46 Streaming Media: Physical Description in Notes Instead of 300 Field
When 300 field is omitted, include notes describing the streaming files, durations, other relevant physical details Type and extent of resource (9.7B8)/Physical description (9.7B10) Available as both streaming video files (53 min., 2 MPEG-4 files, sd., b&w) and downloadable video files (53 min., 2 MPEG-4 files, sd., b&w); downloadable files available via either HTTP or FTP. Contents (9.7B18) High bandwidth version (1 hr., 27 min., WMV file, 137 Kbps, sd., col. with b&w sequences) – Low bandwidth version (1 hr., 27 min., WMV file, 388 Kbps, sd., col. with b&w sequences). Streaming Media: Physical Description in Notes Instead of 300 Field When 300 field is omitted, include notes describing the streaming files, durations, other relevant physical details Type and extent of resource (9.7B8)/Physical description (9.7B10) Task Force recommends combining these notes when it makes sense and to place this note first in absence of 300 field Available as both streaming video files (53 min., 2 MPEG-4 files, sd., b&w) and downloadable video files (53 min., 2 MPEG-4 files, sd., b&w); downloadable files available via either HTTP or FTP. Contents (9.7B18) In some cases, it will be clearer to include some of the file details in a contents note instead; using the contents note is preferred by the Task Force when it makes sense High bandwidth version (1 hr., 27 min., WMV file, 137 Kbps, sd., col. with b&w sequences) – Low bandwidth version (1 hr., 27 min., WMV file, 388 Kbps, sd., col. with b&w sequences).

47 Series and Dependent Titles
“Series” in the Vernacular Sense “(a) a daily or weekly program with the same cast and format and a continuing story, as a soap opera, situation comedy, or drama” “(b) a number of related programs having the same theme, cast, or format” “Series” in the AACR2 Sense “a group of separate items related to one another by the fact that each item bears, in addition to its own title proper, a collective title applying to the group as a whole.” Series and Dependent Titles It is often difficult to make the distinction between the title of a television series (be it broadcast or cable TV) and the title of a videorecording publisher’s series. Moreover, the subtleties of such distinctions are not necessarily on the minds of videorecording publishers when they put together such videos and design their labels, packaging, or promotional materials. This is all further complicated in instances where similarly-named and possibly (but not necessarily) related entities (such as "Arts and Entertainment Network" [nr ] and "A & E Home Video (Firm)" [no ]) are involved. As if that were not confusing enough, catalogers can be thrown off by the unfortunate use of the term "series", both in the formal cataloging sense ("a group of separate items related to one another by the fact that each item bears, in addition to its own title proper, a collective title applying to the group as a whole"--AACR2, Appendix D) and in the vernacular sense of "(a) a daily or weekly program with the same cast and format and a continuing story, as a soap opera, situation comedy, or drama; (b) a number of related programs having the same theme, cast, or format" (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2nd ed.).

48 Series and Dependent Titles
Is Publisher Saying: This program was originally presented as part of such-and-such television series on so-and-so network. 500 Related Title Note 730 Related Title Added Entry Or Is Publisher Saying: We are repackaging the programs originally presented as part of such-and-such television series on so-and-so network as our own series of videorecordings with the overall title of “Blah-blah-blah,” which may (or may not) resemble the title of that such-and-such television series. 4XX/8XX Series Added Entry Series and Dependent Titles If at all possible, try to determine how the video publisher is presenting the information about the television series name. Is it saying simply that: "this program was originally presented as part of such-and-such television series on so-and-so network"? This is so in most cases, and a 500 note referring to the title of the original television series and a 730 related title entry for the uniform title of the TV series are usually appropriate. Or is it indicating that "we are repackaging the programs originally presented as part of such-and-such television series as our own series of videorecordings with the overall title of X"? This will often, but not always be the case, and a 4XX/8XX combination publisher series added entry will be appropriate. By all means, the authority file should be used for guidance, but it is important to be sure about the identity of the authority record that is found.

49 Series and Dependent Titles
730 Related Title Added Entry no Biography (Television program) A&E biography (Television program) The Phantom, c1996: ǂb container (Biography) The Dalai Lama [VR] c1999: ǂb opening frame (A&E Biography) 490/8XX Series Added Entry no Biography (A & E Home Video (Firm)) New York ǂb A&E Home Video f ǂ5 OCl t ǂ5 OCl s ǂ5 OCl Norman Rockwell, c1994: ǂb label (Biography) Series and Dependent Titles In almost every case of a videorecording publication of a television program, there should be a related-entity added entry (field 730) for the uniform title of that television program (as an example: "Biography (Television program)" [no ], which is a related title entry, not a series in the AACR2 sense). That is, the uniform title is for the television program, with the “(Television program)” qualifier. If it can be determined that the videorecording publisher is presenting some form of the title of the television series as a videorecording publisher’s series, a 490/8XX combination would be appropriate (see for example: "Biography (A & E Home Video (Firm))" [no ], which is a series added entry in the AACR2 sense). It can usually be identified by the fact that the series uniform title is often qualified by the publisher’s name and the authority record will usually include 644 (Series Analysis Practice), 645 (Series Tracing Practice), and 646 (Series Classification Practice) fields that identify it as an AACR2-sense series.

50 Series and Dependent Titles
LCRI 25.5B Appendix I Uniform titles for motion pictures, television programs, radio programs, and resources related to them Intended as “PCC Practice” Individual institutions will need to decide whether to follow it Deals mostly with the formulation of uniform titles, and in some cases, the structuring of titles proper from available data Imposes more consistent structure, but often with different results LC uses Archival Moving Image Materials for most moving images AMIM intended for cataloging archival materials, not for cataloging commercially available items Catalog the published item, not the TV program Series and Dependent Titles LCRI 25.5B Appendix I Uniform titles for motion pictures, television programs, radio programs, and resources related to them. Deals mostly with the formulation of uniform titles, and in some cases, the structuring of titles proper from available data Goes on for 28 pages; here I’m dealing mostly with the issue of television series and dependent titles. LCRI is intended as “PCC Practice” and individual institutions will need to decide whether to follow it. LCRI imposes more consistent structure, but one that sometimes ends up with different results than under the old practices for the formulation of both uniform titles and titles proper. Remember that one is cataloging not a TV program, but a published item LC uses AMIM for most moving image resources; Archival Moving Image Materials designed for cataloging archival materials, not really for commercially available items

51 Series and Dependent Titles
LCRI 25.5B Appendix I Assign uniform title to television program when you need to distinguish it from another resource with the same title Use qualifier “(Television program)” for resources that originally aired on television Use additional qualifiers when uniform titles of different television programs would otherwise be the same Year of first telecast Production company or network Country of production Series and Dependent Titles LCRI 25.5B Appendix I Assign uniform title to television program when you need to distinguish it from another resource with the same title Use qualifier “(Television program)” for resources that originally aired on television Use additional qualifiers when uniform titles of different television programs would otherwise be the same Year of first telecast Production company or network Country of production

52 Series and Dependent Titles
LCRI 25.5B Appendix I Comprehensive Title/Individual Title Intended to be Viewed Consecutively Structure title proper as: Comprehensive title, plus Numeric designation (such as episode, show, or production number), plus Individual title, when available Comprehensive title. $n Numeric designation, $p Individual title $h [videorecording]. Series and Dependent Titles Individual Titles that are part of a comprehensive title that is intended to be viewed consecutively Includes: Limited dramatic series (mini-series) Historical documentary series covering a time sequence Educational programs in which material is presented sequentially Structure title proper (from available data) as: Comprehensive title, plus Numeric designation (such as episode, show, or production number), plus Individual title, when available Comprehensive title. $n Numeric designation, $p Individual title $h [videorecording]. When both numeric designation and individual title are not available, use date of telecast: “[YYYY-MM-DD]” Create 246 for individual title if it is distinctive and judged to provide useful title access When in doubt, treat individual titles as NOT intended to be viewed consecutively

53 Series and Dependent Titles
Comprehensive Title/Individual Title Intended to be Viewed Consecutively Civil War (Television program). $n Episode 2, $p a very bloody affair. The Civil War. $n Episode 2, $p a very bloody affair $h [videorecording] / $c American Documentaries, Inc., Florentine Films and Time-Life Video presents a film by Ken Burns ; producers, Ken Burns, Ric Burns ; writers, Ken Burns, Ric Burns, Geoffrey C. Ward ; director, Ken Burns. a very bloody affair Very bloody affair Series and Dependent Titles Note 130, subfields $n and $p Note 246 fields.

54 Series and Dependent Titles
LCRI 25.5B Appendix I Comprehensive Title/Individual Title NOT Intended to be Viewed Consecutively Structure title proper as: Comprehensive title, plus Individual title (when available), or Numeric designation (when individual title not available) Comprehensive title. $p Individual title $h [videorecording]. OR Comprehensive title. $n Numeric designation $h [videorecording]. Series and Dependent Titles Individual titles that are part of a comprehensive title that is NOT intended to be viewed consecutively Includes: Open-ended series such as PBS’s “Nova,” “Live from Lincoln Center” Television programs that are not sequential Structure title proper as: Comprehensive title, plus Individual title (when available), or Numeric designation (when individual title not available) Comprehensive title. $p Individual title $h [videorecording]. OR Comprehensive title. $n Numeric designation $h [videorecording]. When both numeric designation and individual title are not available, use date of telecast: “[YYYY-MM-DD]” Create 246 for individual title if it is distinctive and judged to provide useful title access

55 Series and Dependent Titles
Comprehensive Title/Individual Title NOT Intended to be Viewed Consecutively American experience (Television program). $p That rhythm-- those blues. American experience. $p That rhythm-- those blues $h [videorecording] / $c a GTN production ; presented by WGBH/Boston, WNET/New York and KCET/Los Angeles ; produced and directed by George T. Nierenberg. That rhythm-- those blues Series and Dependent Titles Note 130 subfield $p Note 246

56 Series and Dependent Titles
Compilations: Selected Portions of TV Series Complete Season Collocate with uniform title followed by “Season” designation Sopranos (Television program). $n Season 1. The Sopranos. $n The complete first season $h [videorecording]. Selections from a Particular Season Collocate with uniform title followed by “Season” designation and “Selections” Sopranos (Television program). $n Season 1. $k Selections. The Sopranos. $n The complete first season. $n Disc 2 $h [videorecording]. Series and Dependent Titles Compilations: Selected Portions of TV Series Complete Season Collocate with uniform title followed by “Season” designation Sopranos (Television program). $n Season 1. The Sopranos. $n The complete first season $h [videorecording]. Use standard “Season X” formulation in uniform titles in all cases (for: “year 1,” “season one,” “first season,” “volume 1,” “first year,” etc.) Selections from a Particular Season Collocate with uniform title followed by “Season” designation and “Selections” Sopranos (Television program). $n Season 1. $k Selections. The Sopranos. $n The complete first season. $n Disc 2 $h [videorecording].

57 Series and Dependent Titles
Compilations: Selected Portions of TV Series Selections from Two or More Seasons Collocate with uniform title followed by “Selections” Simpsons (Television program). $k Selections. The Simpsons $h [videorecording] : $b political party. (a compilation of politically themed episodes drawn from several seasons of the program) Series and Dependent Titles Compilations: Selected Portions of TV Series Selections from Two or More Seasons Collocate with uniform title followed by “Selections” Simpsons (Television program). $k Selections. The Simpsons $h [videorecording] : $b political party. (a compilation of politically themed episodes drawn from several seasons of the program) This example is straight from LCRI 25.5B Appendix I. Also use this formulation for compilations “covered by a special rubric such as ‘The best of ...’” (unless the “Best of” rubric relates to a single season).

58 Locally Made Videorecordings
Locally Produced Videorecordings Lectures, local events, theses/dissertations Unique copy or multiple copies for local/limited distribution Treat as unpublished materials Often must supply title (according to AACR2 7.1B2) Field 260 will contain only date of recording, if not already in 245 Locally Made Videorecordings Locally Produced Videorecordings Locally Reproduced Videorecordings Off-air/Off-satellite Videorecordings Refer to “Special Cataloging Guidelines” in BFAS Chapter 3 for details Also: Verna Urbanski’s Cataloging Unpublished Nonprint Materials (1992) Locally Produced Videorecordings -- Lectures, local events, theses/dissertations In video form, these may exist in a unique copy or in multiple copies for local/limited distribution Treated as unpublished materials Often must supply title (according to AACR2 7.1B2) Field 260 will contain only date of recording, if not already in 245 Since locally-produced videos are not published, they would have neither a place of publication nor a publisher. If the date of the recording already appears in the 245 (for instance in a supplied title such as "Lecture delivered on July 5, "), you should not repeat it in the 260 $c; in this instance, the 260 would be totally blank. If the date does not appear in the 245, the 260 would contain only the subfield $c with the date.

59 Locally Made Videorecordings
Locally Reproduced Videorecordings Copies of films, videos, etc. made with permission (for purposes of preservation, circulation) May use existing record or input new record New record only if one for a locally made copy in the same physical format (DVD, VHS, Beta) does not already exist, regardless of date Retain 260 information for original Code field 300 for the copy Add notes for original format, reproduction date, and permission Code 007 for reproduction Locally Reproduced Videorecordings Copies of films, videos, etc. made with permission (for purposes of preservation, circulation) May use and edit existing bibliographic record or may input new record, but only if a record for a locally made copy in the same physical format (DVD, VHS, Beta) does not already exist, regardless of date Retain 260 information for original Code field 300 for the copy Add notes for original format, reproduction date, and permission. Code 007 for reproduction

60 Locally Made Videorecordings
Off-Air/Off-Satellite Videorecordings Licensed copies of TV broadcasts May use existing record for commercially available version or input new record New record only if none exists for off-air copy in same video format, regardless of date or broadcast station Treat as unpublished materials Field 260 has only date of off-air recording Code field 300 for the copy Add notes for off-air/off-satellite license and broadcast station Code 007 for reproduction Off-Air recordings Licensed copies of TV broadcasts (considered unpublished) · May use and edit existing record for commercially available version or may input new record, but only if no record exists for off-air copy in same video format, regardless of date or broadcast station · Field 260 has only date of recording (off-air); code field 300 for the copy · Add notes for off-air/off-satellite license and broadcast station · Code 007 for reproduction


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