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§ 2.4 The Slope of a Line. Martin-Gay, Intermediate Algebra: A Graphing Approach, 4ed 22 Slope Slope of a Line.

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Presentation on theme: "§ 2.4 The Slope of a Line. Martin-Gay, Intermediate Algebra: A Graphing Approach, 4ed 22 Slope Slope of a Line."— Presentation transcript:

1 § 2.4 The Slope of a Line

2 Martin-Gay, Intermediate Algebra: A Graphing Approach, 4ed 22 Slope Slope of a Line

3 Martin-Gay, Intermediate Algebra: A Graphing Approach, 4ed 33 Find the slope of the line through (4, -3) and (2, 2) If we let (x 1, y 1 ) be (4, -3) and (x 2, y 2 ) be (2, 2), then Note: If we let (x 1, y 1 ) be (2, 2) and (x 2, y 2 ) be (4, -3), then we get the same result. Slope Example:

4 Martin-Gay, Intermediate Algebra: A Graphing Approach, 4ed 44 Slope-Intercept Form of a line y = mx + b has a slope of m and has a y-intercept of (0, b). This form is useful for graphing, since you have a point and the slope readily visible. Slope-Intercept Form

5 Martin-Gay, Intermediate Algebra: A Graphing Approach, 4ed 55 Find the slope and y-intercept of the line –3x + y = -5. First, we need to solve the linear equation for y. By adding 3x to both sides, y = 3x – 5. Once we have the equation in the form of y = mx + b, we can read the slope and y-intercept. slope is 3 y-intercept is (0, – 5) Slope-Intercept Form Example:

6 Martin-Gay, Intermediate Algebra: A Graphing Approach, 4ed 66 Find the slope and y-intercept of the line 2x – 6y = 12. First, we need to solve the linear equation for y. – 6y = – 2x + 12 Subtract 2x from both sides. y = x – 2 Divide both sides by – 6. Since the equation is now in the form of y = mx + b, slope is y-intercept is (0, – 2) Slope-Intercept Form Example:

7 Martin-Gay, Intermediate Algebra: A Graphing Approach, 4ed 77 For any 2 points, the y values will be equal to the same real number. The numerator in the slope formula = 0 (the difference of the y-coordinates), but the denominator  0 (two different points would have two different x- coordinates). So the slope = 0. Slope of a Horizontal Line

8 Martin-Gay, Intermediate Algebra: A Graphing Approach, 4ed 88 For any 2 points, the x values will be equal to the same real number. The denominator in the slope formula = 0 (the difference of the x-coordinates), but the numerator  0 (two different points would have two different y- coordinates), So the slope is undefined (since you can’t divide by 0). Slope of a Vertical Line

9 Martin-Gay, Intermediate Algebra: A Graphing Approach, 4ed 99 If a line moves up as it moves from left to right, the slope is positive. If a line moves down as it moves from left to right, the slope is negative. Horizontal lines have a slope of 0. Vertical lines have undefined slope (or no slope). Summary of Slope of Lines

10 Martin-Gay, Intermediate Algebra: A Graphing Approach, 4ed 10 Two lines that never intersect are called parallel lines. Parallel lines have the same slope unless they are vertical lines, which have no slope. Vertical lines are also parallel. Parallel Lines

11 Martin-Gay, Intermediate Algebra: A Graphing Approach, 4ed 11 Find the slope of a line parallel to the line passing through (0,3) and (6,0) So the slope of any parallel line is also –½ Parallel Lines Example:

12 Martin-Gay, Intermediate Algebra: A Graphing Approach, 4ed 12 Two lines that intersect at right angles are called perpendicular lines Two nonvertical perpendicular lines have slopes that are negative reciprocals of each other The product of their slopes will be –1 Horizontal and vertical lines are perpendicular to each other Perpendicular Lines

13 Martin-Gay, Intermediate Algebra: A Graphing Approach, 4ed 13 Find the slope of a line perpendicular to the line passing through (-1,3) and (2,-8) So the slope of any perpendicular line is Perpendicular Lines Example:

14 Martin-Gay, Intermediate Algebra: A Graphing Approach, 4ed 14 Determine whether the following lines are parallel, perpendicular, or neither. –5x + y = –6 and x + 5y = 5 First, we need to solve both equations for y. In the first equation, y = 5x – 6 Add 5x to both sides. In the second equation, 5y = –x + 5 Subtract x from both sides. y = x + 1 Divide both sides by 5. The first equation has a slope of 5 and the second equation has a slope of, so the lines are perpendicular. Parallel and Perpendicular Lines Example:


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