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Maximising student opportunity Sarah Howls Head of Student Opportunity Woburn House 24 th February 2015.

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Presentation on theme: "Maximising student opportunity Sarah Howls Head of Student Opportunity Woburn House 24 th February 2015."— Presentation transcript:

1 Maximising student opportunity Sarah Howls Head of Student Opportunity Woburn House 24 th February 2015

2 HEFCE’s role: Business plan HEFCE aims to create and sustain the conditions for a world-leading system of higher education which transforms lives, strengthens the economy and enriches society

3 HEFCE’s priorities How our strategic position and sector analysis translates into policy activity to widen access, improve retention and student success and support onward progression

4 Will focus on a few key areas: Demonstrating impact of HE activity and HEFCE funding Addressing unexplained differences in outcomes Provision and support for disabled students Progression to taught postgraduate study Evidence to drive policy and show impact

5 But first……………. A quick update on National Networks for Collaborative outreach

6 Achieved national coverage Involving 200 universities and colleges Will reach 4,300 schools Provide single point of contact 35 local networks funded 3 national networks National Networks for Collaborative Outreach

7 The value of public investment

8 Elements of teaching funding

9 Attributing outcomes to activity We need to develop a robust evidence base that demonstrates the impact of HEFCE-funded HE activity to widen access, improve retention and success and support progression on individuals, the economy and society

10 Commissioned two pieces of work One will develop institutional data return The other will use deep dives and econometric analysis to assess impact of activity and investment Undertaken in parallel Inform each other Deliver robust data framework for institutional returns to HEFCE Identify long term, sector wide research needs to address gaps in evidence The outcomes framework Work to develop measures of impact

11 Differential outcomes Ambitions to improve social mobility can only be fully realised if students are able to achieve their full potential

12 Qualification and progression outcomes across POLAR quintiles Percentage point difference of the outcome from the sector-adjusted average for each of the four outcomes, split by POLAR3 quintile Source: ‘Higher education and beyond: outcomes from full-time first degree study’, HEFCE, 2013

13 Qualification and progression outcomes for men and women Percentage point difference of the outcome from the sector-adjusted average for each of the four outcomes, split by sex Source: ‘Higher education and beyond: outcomes from full-time first degree study’, HEFCE, 2013

14 Different ethnicities - different outcomes Source: ‘Differences in degree outcomes: key findings’, HEFCE 2014

15 Shining a light on what we know Commissioned Kings College, University of Manchester and the ARC network to: Gather and collate existing evidence and practice Develop typology of causation, interventions and approaches Critically review and evaluate Call for evidence – 3 December 2014 Final report – May 2015 Critical review of research and practice

16 Supporting disabled students Building on HEFCE’s long history of funding and working with the HE sector to develop and continually enhance its provision and support for disabled students

17 Will involve two research studies: 1.Research to understand the nature, level and cost of institutional provision for students with severe to moderate mental health conditions and/or complex physical impairments in higher education 2.Research into support for students with specific learning difficulties (SpLDs) and the effect on learning outcomes Review of provision and support for disabled students

18 Study 1: Severe to moderate mental health problems Institutional funding and support External agencies In-house vs external support Agency relationships Resourcing and support decisions Balance of funding in DSA Key pressure points/challenges What evidence we need to get (1) To inform advice to Govt and our own policy for disabled students

19 Study 2: Students with SpLDs Key issues in the provision of support Models of support Level, type and funding of support Relationship between support and learning outcomes What evidence we need to get (2) To inform advice to Govt and our own policy for disabled students

20 Access to postgraduate study Postgraduate education is important to all, particularly as societies become more globally inter-dependent

21 PG progression: POLAR

22 IAGS 2013: what factors put you off studying at PG level? (students who were neither ‘certain’ nor ‘likely’

23 Postgraduate Support Scheme (PSS) The Postgraduate Support Scheme (PSS) invited proposals for £25 million funding for pilot projects that test options for finance and activity aimed at stimulating progression into taught postgraduate education, particularly among currently under-represented groups and in areas that support the Government’s ambitions for economic growth. 20 pilot projects have been funded to support more than 1,700 students across 40 universities through a range of activities including financial and pastoral support, mentoring and networking, curricula change, funded studentships, work placements and a variety of bursary and loan schemes. A programme analyst is jointly funded by HEFCE and ESRC and drawing out findings from projects, highlighting innovations, challenges and gaps, and feeding into HEFCE advice to Government about postgraduate funding from

24 PSS and PG funding In July 2013, BIS announced it would study success of PSS to inform investment of an additional £50m repurposed from the National Scholarship Programme to support students from less advantaged backgrounds to access PG education.

25 PG Funding and beyond In the Autumn Statement, Government signalled its intention to provide further PSS funding in and also develop a PGT loan scheme for £50m for Building on PSS £5,000 awards to be match funded (£10,000 per student) Loans for : –Income contingent –Under 30 years old –Postgraduate taught masters in any subject –Up to £10,000

26 ‘Universities and colleges are major contributors to inter- and intra-generational social mobility. They enable individuals from all backgrounds to achieve their full potential as citizens, as professionals, and as highly skilled and valued employees. While progress has been made in the last five years to improve access to higher education from under-represented groups, there is still more to do. Continuing the improvement in participation from all under- represented groups, and eliminating unacceptable disparities in achievement and progression outcomes, therefore remain important objectives on which HEFCE will continue to lead’. Source: Creating and sustaining the conditions for a world-leading higher education system: HEFCE business plan, Why HEFCE supports student opportunity

27 Thank you for listening

28 How to find out more Twitter web-site governance-hefce distribution list HEFCE update, our monthly e-newsletter


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