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Inside the Trenches World War 1. Students will find out what trench warfare was like for soldiers Students will understand the everyday challenges faced.

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Presentation on theme: "Inside the Trenches World War 1. Students will find out what trench warfare was like for soldiers Students will understand the everyday challenges faced."— Presentation transcript:

1 Inside the Trenches World War 1

2 Students will find out what trench warfare was like for soldiers Students will understand the everyday challenges faced by soldiers aside from combat. Students will understand how trench warfare was used and were it started

3 The system design of trench warfare was introduced in September, After the Battle of Marne, German troops held land in France and Belgium. In order to keep this land from occupation of the Allies, German troops were ordered to dig trenches to prevent Allie advancement. Upon realizing the trenches were solid barriers, Allie troops dug trenches as well. The trenches in 1914 stretched from the North Sea to the Swiss Frontier. The German soldiers often had the advantage when it came to trench construction. They were the first to dig trenches and were able to pick the best places, furthest above sea level. Trenches dug at sea level usually resulted in water-logged trenches.

4 Go to: The Front Line No Man’s Land Medical Problems

5 For more information on water-logged trenches and the problems they caused click here.here -Trench FootTrench Foot

6 Front Line Being in the front line trenches was very dangerous for soldiers. One third of all casualties on the Western Front were killed while fighting in the front line. Not only were soldiers battling enemy fire, but they also had to worry about artillery fired from their own troops. It was estimated that almost 75,000 British troops were killed from friendly artillery. Click above image for stories and recollections of soldiers who fought the front line.

7 This is an image of a sideview of the trenches on the front line. They are protected on either side by the Parapet and the Parados with sandbags and barbed wire. The Parados was often built higher than the Parapet to prevent snipers from getting a good eye at the enemy and to prevent attacks from behind on the front line Go Back

8 No Man’s Land The area referred to as No Man’s Land is the land in-between the two fighting lines. This area was often filled with barbed wire and land mines. Rarely were soldiers ordered to cross or enter No Man’s Land but when they were they faced obvious difficulties. When they did enter No Man’s Land, they had to avoid shell holes, water holes, bodies, barbed wire, planted mines, and of course enemy fire. Soldiers would rarely go on full attacks across the land to the other side but would more often enter the area to obtain information from the enemy, getting as close as possible. Patrols into No Man's Land Zonnebeke, No Man’s Land stretched only seven yards.

9 firstwar/vimy.htm C. R. W. Nevinson, Paths of Glory (1917) Go Back

10 Medical Problems Soldiers not only had to worry about artillery fire while in the trenches but also had to battle medical problems such as –Trench FeverTrench Fever –Trench FootTrench Foot –DysenteryDysentery Go Back

11 Trench Fever First reported on Western Front in Signs of fever included headache, leg pains, inflamed eyes, and skin rashes. Soldiers generally recovered after only a few days but would sometimes need to be hospitalized for several weeks. Caused by excretions from lice in the trenches. The disease was transmitted from bites from body lice. For more medical information on trench fever click hereclick here Medical Problems

12 Trench Foot Fungal infectionof the feet usually caused by long exposure to damp, wet environments in the trenches caused by water-logging. It was a very serious condition. Unlike Trench Fever, Trench Foot was deadly and difficult to recover from. By 1914, it is estimated that some 20,000 British troops died because of Trench Foot. Toes and Feet were often amputated if gangrene occurred. Improvements in trench drainage, water resistant footwear, and feet inspections allowed the problem to slow down, though it still effected soldiers throughout the war.

13 The feet of a soldier suffering from trench foot Medical Problems

14 Dysentery This was generally caused by contaminated water for the trenches were extremely unsanitary with poor latrines. Latrines were simply holes in the ground and often filled up without time to make another one. The disease itself is the inflammation of the large intestines which causes stomach pains, diarrhea, and vomiting, which leads to dehydration. Many soldiers died from dehydration caused by dysentery. Since there was such a limited supply of clean water in the trenches, soldiers often relied on dirty unsanitary water found in shell holes. For more on Dysentery in the trenches with recollections from soldiers click herehere Medical Problems

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