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Physical and Chemical Properties I Can… -Distinguish between a physical-chemical properties and changes. -Apply the law of conservation of mass to chemical.

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Presentation on theme: "Physical and Chemical Properties I Can… -Distinguish between a physical-chemical properties and changes. -Apply the law of conservation of mass to chemical."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Physical and Chemical Properties

3 I Can… -Distinguish between a physical-chemical properties and changes. -Apply the law of conservation of mass to chemical reactions. -Distinguish between homogeneous and heterogeneous mixtures. -Compare and contrast compounds, elements, and atoms.

4 Substances Substances- are matter that has a uniform and UNCHANGING composition Example: Water- pure water- is uniform (same through out) and its composition will ALWAYS be H 2 O

5 Physical Properties Physical properties- are characteristics that can be observed or measured without changing the samples’ composition. colorodor boiling point melting point conduction density malleablephase- at room temperature luster solubility

6 Physical Properties What is the difference between extensive and intensive properties? Extensive properties are dependent upon the amount of substance that is there. Example- length, volume, shape Intensive properties are independent of the amount of substance present. Example- density, or melting point or boiling point

7 What are chemical properties? Chemical properties describes the ability of a substance to react with another substance. Ability to catch on fire (flammability) Ability to rust (corrosion) Ability to burn skin (acid)

8 States of Matter Shapevolume Particle distance Solids Liquids Gases Definite Very close together Undefined- shape of container Defined Particles slide past each other Undefined- shape of container Undefined- Volume Compressible Particles are very very far apart

9 Physical Change When the appearance changes but not the composition of the substance remains the same is called a physical change. Water is still water whether it’s a solid (ice) or gas (steam) Hair is hair whether its long or cut short Example: Freezing, cutting, crumpling, breaking, crushing and boiling

10 Chemical Changes A process that involves one or more substances changing into new substances is called a chemical change. Examples- rusting car, burning paper, rotting food, tarnish. 4Fe (solid)+2 O 2 (gas) 4FeO (rust)

11 How do you know if it’s going through a chemical change? When observing a “change” at least 2 of these have to be present. Temperature change Presence of a gas (bubbles) Color change Odor change Precipitate- solid floaters

12 Law of Conservation of mass That mass is neither created nor destroyed during a chemical reaction- it is conserved

13 Law of Conservation of mass A chemical change results in a new substance being formed. They rearrange to form a new substance. What happens to the individual atoms during a chemical change? Hydrogen molecule – H 2 + Oxygen molecule – O 2 2 molecule of H 2 O- water

14 6. From a laboratory process designed to separate water into hydrogen and oxygen gas, a student collected 10.0 g of hydrogen and 79.4 g of oxygen. How much water was originally involved in the process? If 10 grams of hydrogen and 79.4 grams of oxygen are collected, that means there is 89.4 grams of water to start.

15 7. A student carefully placed 15.6 g of sodium in a reactor supplied with an excess quantity of chlorine gas. When the reaction was complete, the student obtained 39.7 g of sodium chloride. How many grams of chlorine gas reacted? How many grams of sodium reacted? 39.7 grams of sodium chloride was obtained. 15.6 of it was sodium so that makes 24.1 grams of chlorine was used. 15.6 grams of sodium.

16 8. In a flask, 10.3 g of aluminum reacted with 100.0 g of liquid bromine to form aluminum bromide. After the reaction, no aluminum remained, and 8.5 grams of bromine remained unreacted. How many grams of bromine reacted? How many grams of compound were formed? 10.3 g aluminum + (100g – 8.5 g= 91.5g) bromine = 101.8 grams of aluminum bromide

17 9. A 10.0-g sample of magnesium reacts with oxygen to form 16.6 g of magnesium oxide. How many grams of oxygen reacted? 10 g of magnesium – 16.6 grams of magnesium oxide = 6.6 g of oxygen

18 By composition. What its made out of Matter is sorted… Mixtures AND Substances What are the two broad categories of separating matter?

19 Matter MixturesSubstances

20 Spices Provide at least 5 examples. blood brass Dirt Pizza

21 A mixture is a combination of two or more substances in which each of the substances retain their identity. They can be separated by physical means. What are mixtures?

22 Define heterogeneous mixture. A mixture that is NOT evenly distributed. These types of mixtures have two or more compositions and are called heterogeneous mixture. Two kinds of Mixtures These mixtures can be separated by physical means. It can be very obvious-like a salad or difficult to catch- orange juice (pulp).

23 Define homogeneous mixture. A mixture that IS evenly distributed. Homogeneous mixtures are composed of one composition. These mixtures can be separated by physical means. What are some types of solutions? Homogeneous mixtures are the same composition through out the mixture. Solutions ARE homogeneous mixtures.

24 Matter MixturesSubstances Heterogeneous Homogeneous-(Solutions) Not the same through out Same through out physical Chemical

25 What are compounds? Are types of pure matter that can be broken down into simpler substances. What are elements? Are types of pure matter that can not be broken down into simpler substances. Sodium Chloride Elements are the simplest form of matter.

26 Matter MixturesSubstances Heterogeneous Homogeneous-(Solutions) Not the same through out Same through out physical Fixed composition/properties CompoundsElements H 2 O H 2 O 2 CO 2 Chemical Can be broken downCan’t be broken down H2O2CH2O2C

27 C 12 H 22 O 11 Sugar Examples of Substances Au gold NaCl Salt C 3 H 7 OH Alcohol CO 2 Dry Ice Cl Chlorine I Iodine O Oxygen H 2 O Water Na Sodium S Sulfur

28 C 12 H 22 O 11 Sugar Sort the substances Au gold NaCl Salt C 3 H 7 OH Alcohol CO 2 Dry Ice Cl Chlorine I Iodine O Oxygen H 2 O Water Na Sodium S Sulfur ElementsCompounds

29 Define Law of definite proportions- Law of multiple proportions Regardless of the amount, a compound is always composed of the same elements in the same proportion by mass. H 2 O- 2 grams come from hydrogen and 16 grams of oxygen. Basically- that different compounds CAN be made of the same elements but in different proportions. H 2 O 2 and H 2 O


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