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1.What is understanding and how does it differ from knowing? 2.What do we want students to know, to understand, and be able to do? 3.What enduring knowledge.

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Presentation on theme: "1.What is understanding and how does it differ from knowing? 2.What do we want students to know, to understand, and be able to do? 3.What enduring knowledge."— Presentation transcript:

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3 1.What is understanding and how does it differ from knowing? 2.What do we want students to know, to understand, and be able to do? 3.What enduring knowledge is worth understanding? 4.How can we design courses to emphasize understanding?

4 At The End of A Lesson…

5 Discuss Abraham Lincoln's presidency and his significant writings and speeches and their relationship to the Declaration of Independence, such as his "House Divided" speech (1858), "Gettysburg Address" (1863), "Emancipation Proclamation" (1863), inaugural addresses (1861 and 1865).

6 1.Explanation 2.Interpretation 3.Application 4.Perspective 5.Empathy 6.Self-Knowledge

7 Carol Tomlinson, reknown public school teacher and author of books on differentiating instruction, says conceptual learning provides opportunities for students to engage in higher order thinking skills, such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. For example: When the topic is Civil War, the concept is conflict.

8 A dividing nation Challenges to founding principles A divided nation bound for war A nation both pro and against slavery

9 Did Lincoln's views change over time? Did Lincoln stay true to the principles stated in the Declaration of Independence? Could Lincoln have prevented a Civil War? At the time of the Civil War, was the United States pro or against slavery?

10 That we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain - that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom - and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

11 Encourage exploration of the topic by asking questions, creating hands-on activities, and sharing of knowledge and experiences.  Invite students to join a conversation about the topic. What do they already know? -believe? Why does the topic matter?  Introduce key concepts by reading an article, a novel, a poem, a story, viewing a piece of art, a video, a chart, or a map. A first “reading” about a topic assures each student will have something to say about it.  Model reading strategies such as annotation, thinking out loud, asking questions, and descriptive outlines.

12 When: July 1- 3, 1863 Where: Gettysburg, Pennsylvania Who: General Meade commanded the Union General Lee commanded the Confederacy 95,000 Union soldiers 75, 000 Confederate soldiers 23, 000 Union soldiers died 22,000 Confederate soldiers died

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16 Descriptive Outlines teach students to distinguish between what texts say and do. A Says statement summarizes the text. A Does statement identifies (or suggests) purpose. The strategy can be used for word or image texts.

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19 That we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain - that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom - and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

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21 Here’s A Sample STAR question Question: Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address is similar to the Declaration of Independence in that both documents A. include descriptions of laws which should be passed. B. emphasize the need for effective government. C. support the ideals of self-government and human rights. D.justify the need for economic change. Correct answer: C


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