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Research: English 11 3-5 Pages (not including works cited page) Double-spaced Due: March 23, 2012, 2:50 Note: PowerPoint is currently in progress. It will.

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Presentation on theme: "Research: English 11 3-5 Pages (not including works cited page) Double-spaced Due: March 23, 2012, 2:50 Note: PowerPoint is currently in progress. It will."— Presentation transcript:

1 Research: English Pages (not including works cited page) Double-spaced Due: March 23, 2012, 2:50 Note: PowerPoint is currently in progress. It will get you through the first several days of research, however. Latest Update: March 12, 10:30 pm

2 Determining and Refining Your Topic Read over the task (what the research needs to be about). Choose a topic that seems interesting to you.

3 Determining and Refining Your Topic You will need narrow your topic into a workable research question. First, look up your topic on one or more of the encyclopedia sites available through the school’s subscription services (Encyclopedia Britannica or Gale Virtual Reference Library). This will help you gain some general information on your topic and help you to narrow it down to something manageable.Encyclopedia Britannica Gale Virtual Reference Library Print out these articles. Make sure that you print the citation information. You can use these articles in your paper!

4 Determining and Refining Your Topic Read the article(s). Create a research question. Write it on the Keyword Chart. Here are some examples:Keyword Chart ◦ What was the purpose of FDR’s New Deal, what were some examples of its programs, and how might it help us determine what to do in today’s economic crisis? ◦ How did Eleanor Roosevelt influence the women of her time, and how is influence still relevant today?

5 Determining and Refining Your Topic Once you’ve narrowed your topic into a manageable question, it is time to create a keyword chart that will help you to identify workable search terms. Look at this example. Complete your own chart. (The next few slides can help you).example chart

6 Determining and Refining Your Topic To complete the Keyword Chart:Keyword Chart Identify up to three major concepts (ideas or subtopics) that you would like to investigate regarding your topic. Put them on the lines on your Keyword chart that look like the lines below: 2. Identify up to 3 key concepts in your search question. ___________ ______________________

7 Determining and Refining Your Topic Put your three key concepts across the first row of the keyword chart. Then fill in the rest of the chart with synonyms. (See example chart). Use a thesaurus if you need help! example chartthesaurus Key Concept Synonym

8 Determining and Refining Your Topic Before you move on be sure that you have: _____chosen a topic _____created a research question (keyword chart) _____decided on search terms (keyword chart) _____discussed your chart with Mrs. Nannen

9 Locating Sources Identify possible sources of information. Sources should include: ◦ At least 1 book ◦ At least 1 non-encyclopedia-type article from one of the library’s subscription databasessubscription databases ◦ At least 1 encyclopedia article from one of the library’s subscription databases subscription databases ◦ No more than 1 general Internet site (i.e. something from a Google search). You will want to locate more sources that what you need. Not all of the sources you find will be helpful.

10 Locating Sources Locating appropriate sources of information is a circular process. In other words, you will go through several steps in the process, then go back and do them over for another source. You will want to:  Find a good source  Make photocopies (if a book)  Create a source card  Read the information thoroughly and take good notes  Go through the process again for another source

11 Locating Sources: Books You should already have an encyclopedia article from one of the library’s subscription databases. Now it is time to look for a book source. Go to OPAC (Online Public Access Catalog).OPAC Use the search terms on your keyword chart to locate a book that may contain information on the topic. This may take several searches! Use the call number to locate the book on the library shelf.

12 Locating Sources: Books Once you have found a book with a good section of information:  Scan the table of contents and index to help you find information quickly.  Make a photocopy of the information you want to use.  Make a photocopy of the FRONT and BACK of the title page.  Create a source card.  Read the information thoroughly and take notes on 3 x 5 note cards.

13 Sample Source Card Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. New York: Bantam Books, Print. Source #1 Make sure to write the source number on the top right corner of the card. Each source will have a different number. All note cards from that same source will share that same number.

14 Sample Note Card SLUG (topic for the card) (source #) “A direct quote is the author’s thoughts in the author’s words.” OR A paraphrase sums up the author’s meaning, but is written in your own words. You still have to cite it. (Parenthetical Citation) Prohibition Definition (source 1) “A policy of legally forbidding the manufacture, transportation, sale, or consumption of alcoholic beverages except for medicinal or scientific purposes.” (Nishi 5)

15 Taking Notes Continue to locate sources and take notes until you have: ◦ 1 book source ◦ 2 subscription database articles ◦ 1 general Internet site (from a Google search—be sure that it is reliable). ◦ 30 note cards

16 Locating Sources: Databases If you haven’t already done so, you will now need to locate at least one more article from one of the library’s subscription databases. You should have one already from the first day of research. Use your keyword chart to identify helpful search terms. Use one of the databases from the list below. These are the same databases listed on the library’s web site.

17 Locating Sources: Databases When you find an article that looks promising, scan it over first. If it is truly helpful, print it out. You should print more than one. Make sure that you have printed the Works Cited information. In most cases, it will print out with the article, but in some cases, you will have to locate it separately. Finally, take notes like you did with the book source.

18 Locating Sources: Internet You will need to find one article on from the Web. You can do a Google search for this one, using the search terms on your keyword chart for help. Before you print out this article, be sure that you can trust it. (See the next slide).

19 Locating Sources: Internet When evaluating a Web resource, ask yourself: Is the author credible? Is the web site created and maintained by a reliable organization (i.e. university, respectable newspaper or magazine, government) Is the web site biased in any way?

20 Locating Sources: Internet Once you have found a reliable Internet site, you can create a source card using the MLA style guide, and take notes on note cards as you did for books.

21 Locating Sources Before you move on be sure that you have: ___ located 1 encyclopedia-type article from the library’s databases and created a source card. ___ located 1 non-encyclopedia-type article from the library’s databases and created a source card. ___ located 1 book source, photocopied appropriate pages, and created a source card. ___ located 1 general Internet source, evaluated it for reliability, and created a source card

22 Locating Sources Before you move on, be sure that you have (cont). ___ read each article thoroughly ___ taken notes on note cards as directed ___ completed 30 or more note cards


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