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We've talked (in Chapter 1) about the nature of poetry, its proud traditions, its origins in the beginning of the written word and its intensity of expression.

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Presentation on theme: "We've talked (in Chapter 1) about the nature of poetry, its proud traditions, its origins in the beginning of the written word and its intensity of expression."— Presentation transcript:

1 We've talked (in Chapter 1) about the nature of poetry, its proud traditions, its origins in the beginning of the written word and its intensity of expression and thought. We followed the idea of the multidimensional nature of poetry with an exploration into effective reading of a poem (in Chapter 2) because poems are more than words; they are phonetic displays--meant to be read aloud. These ideas lead into Chapter 3 with its discussion about language's trio of parts: its sound, its denotation or meaning, and its connotation or emotive range. We also catalogued important steps in understanding a poetic work: identifying speaker, setting, occasion, tone, imagery, central symbols and purposes. Today, we will closely examine the language of the poem because--ultimately--poems consist of words, sounds, and images created with words.

2 Paraphrase When my love swears that she is made of truth on page 43. First, you must decide on the tone and, second, on the truth or reality of the relationship being discussed. Also, include (in your paraphrase) the correct connotations of “lie.” Include, also, information from the responses to the questions from your homework.

3 When my sweetie says she is the epitome of truth, I believe her, though I know she’s a lying dog, Treating me as if I were an unschooled pup Who has never been out of the back yard. However, since my vanity is linked to her Interest in me; and, since she pretends I’m Not too old for her (although I really am), Foolishly, I put up with all her jive, lies and infidelity. On the other hand, she doesn’t really claim to be Faithful, nor do I really admit to her I’m too old for her. Ha! Love’s best trait is pretense because lovers Don’t like to admit they are past their prime. Therefore, we lie to each other as we lie with each other, Both accepting each other's lies to boost our pride. The attraction of the affair is sensual, as shown by the two meanings of “lie’— conjunction at the physical level, separateness at the spiritual.

4 Pathedy of Manners Page The Comedy of Manners is a witty, ironic form of drama that satirizes the manners and fashions of a particular social class or set. Comedies of manners are usually written by sophisticated authors for members of their own social class, and they typically are concerned with social usage and the ability or inability of certain characters to meet social standards, which are often exacting but morally trivial. The plot, usually concerning an illicit love affair or other scandalous matter, is subordinate to the play's brittle atmosphere, witty dialogue, and pungent commentary on human foibles. Pathedy, on the other hand, has its roots in Greek: disease; suffering: pathogen. It is a made up word, here, combining patho and comedy. List words that have to do with beauty and grace, manners and culture, desire and intelligence. Then, list ironies that you notice form your lists and from the poem.

5 INTELLIGENCEDESIRE brilliantadored Phi Beta Kappasought for symbolic logicglance of men learnedinterest diploma thought espouse MANNERS AND CULTURE WEALTH dancesole rewardantique crystal cultured jargonauthentic pearlsWagner BredDegasdomes and tapestries Conversedimpoverished Marquis BreedingWedgwoodpearl cufflinks ideal marriage ideal (with negative and ironic connotation

6 Pathedy of Manners is not a comedy: there is no happy ending. Neither is it a tragedy: there is no dismal fall, no heroic character. Rather, it concerns the pathetic (meaning?) waste of life and talent by a woman whose false values made her prefer appearance over substance and choose manners over merit. Inasmuch as her false values are those of a class, the poem presents a form of social pathology.

7 Naming of Parts A polyphonic narrative on page 48 List opposites

8 What they gotWhat they have not DEATHLIFE INCOMPLETENESSCOMPLETENESS MECHANICALNATURAL REGIMENTATIONFREEDOM AWKWARDNESSGRACE DRABNESSBEAUTY TEDIUMJOY WARPEACE OUT OF BALANCEPOINT OF BALANCE ISOLATEDWHOLE Sexual parts or actions: thumb, bolt, breech, rapidly backwards and forwards, assaulting and fumbling, cocking piece, finger

9 Cross Page 49 List connotations of “cross.”

10 mix, angry, intersection, to span, to treat badly or betray, Christian symbol, used by the KKK

11 There is no Frigate like a Book Page 41 Explore denotation and connotation of words (frigate, coursers, traverse, frugal). Answer questions on pages

12 COLORING DAY!! Draw--and color!--your interpretation of the poem. Show your finished drawing to the class, explain it, hang it up.


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