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Bridget Schuld 1, Naiman A. Khan 1, Lauren B. Raine 1, Eric Drollette 1, Mark Scudder 1, Matthew Pontifex 1, Sharon M. Donovan 1, Ellen M. Evans 2, Darla.

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Presentation on theme: "Bridget Schuld 1, Naiman A. Khan 1, Lauren B. Raine 1, Eric Drollette 1, Mark Scudder 1, Matthew Pontifex 1, Sharon M. Donovan 1, Ellen M. Evans 2, Darla."— Presentation transcript:

1 Bridget Schuld 1, Naiman A. Khan 1, Lauren B. Raine 1, Eric Drollette 1, Mark Scudder 1, Matthew Pontifex 1, Sharon M. Donovan 1, Ellen M. Evans 2, Darla M. Castelli 3, Charles H. Hillman 1 1 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2 University of Georgia, 3 University of Texas at Austin Abstract Introduction Objective & Hypothesis Results Materials and Methods Conclusions Central adiposity is strongly related to insulin resistance and is the most clinically relevant type of body fat in children as is the case in adults. This study aimed to determine diet and media use components related to central adiposity among 229 prepubertal children (8.85 ± 0.59 years). It was hypothesized that increased sugar intake and television viewing will be related to increased central adiposity. Parents reported their child’s weekend television viewing (TV). Maximal oxygen consumption (VO 2max ) and one 24-hour recall were used to assess fitness and diet, respectively. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure percent fat mass (%Fat) and central adiposity (FM-abd). Gender specific waist circumference-for-age percentiles (WC-age) were determined. Among females, increased FM-abd was related to weekend TV (r=0.22, p=0.02), intake of added sugars (r=0.36, p=0.03), and cholesterol-to-saturated fatty acid index (r=0.28, p=0.22). These relationships remained significant after controlling for fitness and total diet energy density (kcals/grams). Among males, no diet or media use variables were related to FM-abd. Females above the 75 th percentile cutoff of WC-age (N=32) had higher energy intake (p=0.04), added sugars (p<0.01), and cholesterol-to-saturated fatty index (p=0.03) than females below the cutoff. Weekend TV and added sugar intake appears to be related to central adiposity, independent of fitness and energy density. These relationships were only significant among females and not males suggesting that dietary and sedentary behaviors may have differential health-related outcomes for prepubertal children based on gender. Added Sugar Intake and Weekend Television Viewing is Related to Increased Central Adiposity among Prepubertal Children 229 prepubertal children were recruited from an ongoing NIH-Funded after-school physical activity research trial (FITKids) Whole body % Fat Mass and central adiposity were measured using Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed by measuring maximal oxygen consumption (VO 2max ) using a computerized indirect calorimetry system and a modified Balke protocol (ACSM, 2006) Diet intake by measured using one parent-assisted 24-hour diet recall Parents reported their child’s weekday and weekend television (TV) use Obesity and overweight in childhood have been on the rise in the United States and currently stand at a prevalence rate of 17% (≥95 th percentile BMI-for-age) and 30% (≥85 th percentile BMI-for-age), respectively. Obesity in early childhood is a strong predictor of obesity in adulthood and can lead to life-threatening medical conditions, such as diabetes and coronary heart disease. Abdominal adipose tissue (central adiposity) in children has been previously correlated with higher plasma lipids, elevated blood pressure, and insulin resistance. Research is needed to determine which behavioral factors (e.g. media use and diet intake) are related to central adiposity among children Objective: The overall objective of this research is to determine how TV viewing and diet intake affect central adiposity in prepubertal children. Hypothesis: It was hypothesized that increased added sugar intake and television viewing will be related to increased central adiposity. (Supported by NIH HD055352) Figure 2. Females have Higher Central Adiposity than Males Females (N=113) Males (N=116)) Weekend TV time and intake of added sugars was related to central adiposity among females, after controlling for fitness. We observed differences in added sugars between females based on the waist circumference-for-age cutoff (75 th percentile). Given that these relationships were only significant among girls and not boys suggests that certain dietary and sedentary behaviors may have differential health-related outcomes for prepubertal children based on gender. Table 3. Weekend TV Time is Correlated with Central Adiposity Among Females (N=99), After Controlling for Fitness and Energy Density Central Adiposity 2Waist-to-Height Ratio 0.85** 3Whole body %Fat Mass 0.87**0.71** 4BMI 0.90** 0.72** 5Television/weekday Television/weekend day 0.24*0.22* **0.50** **Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (one-tailed) *Correlation is significant at the 0.05 level (one-tailed)) Figure 3. Females Above the 75 th Percentile Waist-for-Age Have Higher Intake of Added Sugars Females (N=113)Males (N=116) Age (years)8.9 ± ± 0.6 Birth weight (kg)3.4 ± ± 1.0 Weight (kg)38.6 ± 11.3*35.1 ± 11.6 Height (cm)136.8 ± ± 7.9 BMI (kg/m 2 )19.9 ± 4.1*18.4 ± 4.1 Waist Circumference (cm)67.03 ± 10.24*63.76 ± 8.54 Waist-to-Height Ratio0.49 ± 0.07*0.47 ± 0.05 Data presented as mean ± standard deviation * Indicates significant difference between groups (p<0.05) Intake Reported% of EnergyRecommendation Energy (kcal) ± Protein (g) ± Fat (g) ± Carbohydrate (g) ± Added Sugars (g) ± <25 Saturated Fatty Acids (g) ± <10 Cholesterol (mg) ± <300 Fiber (g)14.04 ± Sodium (mg) ± <1500 Potassium (mg) ± mg Calcium (mg) ± Table 1. Participant Age and Anthropometrics Figure 1. BMI-for-age Classifications by Gender Data presented as mean ± standard deviation Table 2. Diet Intake Reported by Males and Females (N=152) Data presented as mean ± standard deviation * Indicates significant difference between groups (p<0.05) Data presented as mean ± standard deviation * Indicates significant difference between groups (p<0.05) *


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