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Good Morning, Riverview Gardens High School Ram Tough Faculty.

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1 Good Morning, Riverview Gardens High School Ram Tough Faculty

2 Engagement Cambourne’s Conditions for Learning Expectation Meaningful use Demon- stration Responsi- bility Approxi- mation Cambourne, Brian The Whole Story: Natural Learning & the Acquisition of Literacy in the Classroom. Auckland, NZ: Immersion Response

3 Demonstration Modeling Direct- instruction Guided Practice Assisted Application Independent Practice & Application Gradual-Release-of-Responsibility Model P. David Pearson & M.C. Gallagher, The Instruction of Reading Comprehension. Contemporary Educational Psychology. 8, Teacher (I do) Teacher-to-Student Student-to-Student (We do) Student (You do)

4 The Gradual-release-of-responsibility Instructional Model Teacher-directed InstructionPeer-supported LearningSelf-directed Learning Whole Class Small Group Independent Notice the gradual release of responsibility from teacher to student. This instructional model requires that whatever we want students to know, we must first model what it looks like, provide time for students’ guided practice so they achieve literate independence. P. David Pearson & & M.S. Gallagher, The Instruction of Reading Comprehension. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 8,

5 ABCDE FGHIJ KLMNO PQRST UVWXY-Z What nonfiction have you read lately?

6 Narrative entertain tell a story reveal a “truth” plot structure peginning-middle-end literary elements prose or poetry chapters/titles stylistic illustrations Expository inform explain add to reader’s knowledge of subject visuals (drawings, graphs, charts, diagrams) maps, timelines headings/subhjeadings sidebars glossary/appendix/table of contents/index insets Functional show reader how to do something or get somewhere lists sequence words numbered items arrows instructions/procedures directional indicators degree words All Texts Aren’t Equal

7 Content/Specialized Vocabulary Text Features Text Structures Monitoring Understanding Previewing Text Activating Background Knowledge Questioning Noting, Organizing, and Retrieving Information Plugged-in to Nonfiction by Dr. Janet Allen. Triumph Learning

8 Strategy Skill A strategy... is conscious use, shows “how to,” transfers to other contexts, & transfers to other contents. * Modeled lesson * Shared & guided practice * Independent use A skill is... unconscious use, obtained when a strategy becomes automatic, & “a strategy gone underground.” develo ped by Revisit stages to facilitate transfer Independent use Motivated problem-solving Diverse applications reinforced through

9 Planning for Strategy Instruction Introduction Find the “hook” for the concept. Specify or define what students will learn. Identify the language that needs to be taught. Modeled Lesson What is your teaching purpose? What resource(s) will you use? How will you “think aloud” the process? Guided Practice & Independent Learning *Determine attributes of the lesson or concept. *Choose a resource where students can practice the modeled lesson. *Choose a graphic organizer to support learning. Closure *Revisit steps in the strategy. *Chart or record in academic journals *Plan for transfer to another text © Dr. Janet Allen

10 Planning for Strategy Instruction IntroductionModeled Lesson Guided Practice & Independent Learning Closure © Dr. Janet Allen

11 I’m teaching students how to _______ (strategy) in order to _____________________ (teaching purpose/learning goal) (teaching purpose/learning goal) by using ______________________. (context, scaffold) I’ll know they’ve got it when ________. (assessment) (assessment) © Dr. Janet Allen

12 Name: ______________________________________Date: ______________ Deadly Invaders Lesson Guide B Power Strategy Lesson: Questioning Marburg Collage continued What details do you notice in the pictures? ___________ ______________________________________________ Based on the details, what questions do you have? ______________________________________________ ©2012 by Triumph Learning. For instructions, go to page 24 of the Core Text Teacher Guide.

13 Lesson Guide B Power Strategy Lesson: Questioning Deadly Invaders QuestionAnswer & PageNew QuestionAnswer & Page WONDER WORKS! Plugged-in to Nonfiction by Dr. Janet Allen. Triumph Learning

14 Exit Slip 1.How can questioning help you during Independent Reading? 2.How can questioning help you when reading your content area texts?

15 Sneak Peek Plugged-in to Nonfiction by Dr. Janet Allen. Triumph Learning

16 Exit Slip 1.Name one prediction you made that proved to be accurate. 2.Name one prediction you made that required revision or refinement. How did you refine your prediction?

17 Activating (or Building) Background Knowledge & a little Vocabulary & Questioning

18 Principles for Building Background Knowledge Marzano, Robert. Building Background Knowledge for Academic Achievement. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, Bimodal Packets Background Knowledge Manifested by Vocabulary Knowledge Surface-level Background Knowledge is Useful Never Heard of It Know It from Experience Heard of It & Know Something about It Understand Key Elements bully bystande r informant logogensimagens Words are the ticket in To larger under- standing word sort Enhancing Permanent Memory Multiple exposures to information Deep processing (add details) Elaboration (make associations) Multidimensional & Value is Contextual Virtual Experiences Enhance Background Knowledge *Reading*Educational TV viewing *Talking/listening to others

19 Facts & Questions Ladder Bonobo is one of the great apes. Bonobos share 98.7% of human DNA, more than any other mammal. Bonobos have learned how to communicate using American Sign Language. Tools for Teaching Content Literacy by Dr. Janet Allen. © Stenhouse Publishers

20 Admit Slip 3.List three words you think of when you look at this picture. 2.Write two ideas you have based on the picture and your words. If possible, use your words as you write your ideas. a. I think... b. I think... 1.Write one question you have. Tools for Teaching Content Literacy by Dr. Janet Allen. © Stenhouse Publishers

21 Wordstorming to Anticipate Content A – B C – D E – FG – H I – JK – L M – N O – P Q – R S – T U – VWXYZ Content Prediction:Questions Article should Answer : Tools for Teaching Content Literacy by Dr. Janet Allen. © Stenhouse Publishers

22 Brain Quest: B K W L Q Brain knowledge before quest: Knowledge we now have: What surprised us? What we’ve learned: Words we’ve learned: Questions we have: Tools for Teaching Content Literacy by Dr. Janet Allen. © Stenhouse Publishers

23 Content & Specialized Vocabulary

24 Four Components of a Comprehensive Vocabulary Program Fostering Word Consciousness Build excitement around language in general and words specifically. Experience the rhythm of language as developed through words. Understanding degrees of meaning and word choice. Word Walls, Personal Dictionary, Word Sort Teaching Strategies for Learning Words Independently Context clues Structural analysis Linear arrays Conceptual vocabulary Teaching Individual Words Word study Multiple-meaning words Homonyms, synonyms Frequent/extensive/varied Opportunities for Independent Reading Next Slide, Please Baumann, J.F. Keme’eneu, E.J. (eds) Vocabulary Instruction: Research to Practice. NY: Guilford Press

25 bias, exclusive On the Same Page256 is not is Example Nonexample prejudice unfair inclusive fair

26 Word Questioning I think this word means... Are there parts of the word I recognize? It is... How does this word fit with other words and concepts I know? When, where, and under what conditions might I find this word? What makes this an important word? Target word in Context It is not... comprehension analysis example application synthesis knowledge nonexample evaluation Tools for Teaching Content Literacy by Dr. Janet Allen. © Stenhouse Publishers

27 Directions: Create a cartoon about one of the vocabulary words below. Each cartoon should include the following: 1.The vocabulary word, 2.The definition of the word, 3.A rhyming word or phrase 4.A funny or interesting sentence that uses the word. 5.A cartoon picture that illustrates the sentence. atom genus species quarks cell larva proton element energy habitat pupa virus The Stunning Science of Everything Vocabutoons (Burchers, 1997)

28 Alike but Different What We Have in Common How I’ll Remember Tools for Teaching Content Literacy by Dr. Janet Allen. © Stenhouse Publishers

29 1. Integration 2. Repetition 3. Meaningful use

30 Previewing Text & Text Features Noting, Organizing & Retrieving Info

31 T extbook A ctivity G uide (TAG)

32 The Fast Track: The Importance of Previewing Text Directions: When reading nonfiction, it is extremely important to preview the text. The more information you have when you start, the more likely you are to remember the most important parts of what you read. There are lots of ways to preview a text. See what you can determine from reading this book on the fast track. 1.Look at the cover. Make a prediction about the book based on what you see. 2.Based on this cover, do you think you will like this book? Why or why not? 3.There are four chapters in this book. List the chapter titles below. __________________________________ 4.Based on these chapter titles, write three statements that relate to your predictions for what you will learn about Phineas Gage in this book.

33 5.Take a picture walk by glancing at the visuals in this book. There are a lot of photographs,, diagrams, charts and maps. Write three fast facts you learned from your picture walk. 6.Vocabulary can be challenging in some nonfiction books. Skim the captions that go with the visuals and look at the glossary. Complete the following sentences: I think the vocabulary in this book will be ________________________. The words seem to be related to ________________________________. I think I’ll find the language in this book challenging because ____________. Strategies I’ll use to make the vocabulary easier to read and remember are_________. 7.The Index can give you a quick sense of the some of the topics you will read about in a nonfiction book. What assumptions can you make about this book based on the index? 8.Based on conclusions from your fast track, draw an image of what you think this book will contain. You will revisit this after you read the book to make changes based on new information. B. Davey, Using Textbook Activity Guides to Help Students Learn from Textbooks. Journal of Reading The Fast Track: The Importance of Previewing Text continued

34 Janet’s 5-finger Rule Write down all of the headings. Write down all of the sub- headings. Do a picture walk. Read the 1 st paragraph. Read the last paragraph. © Dr. Janet Allen

35 TextStructures

36 Organizing Ideas: A Writer’s Gift to Readers Text StructureSample from the TextCue Words & Supports for Readers Sequence/chronology Dr. Harlow’s treatment of Phineas’ wound then, finally... The use of sequence helped me visualize the process Compare/contrast Cause/effect Problem/solution Question/answer Description Combination Plugged-in to Nonfiction by Dr. Janet Allen. Triumph Learning

37 MonitoringUnderstanding

38 Origin of Information/ Who is the source? What are the facts?What are the opinions of this person? This makes me wonder... Learning through Inquiry More Tools for Teaching Content Literacy by Dr. Janet Allen. © Stenhouse Publishers

39 Expert Groups I/We’re Experts On _______________ N N Notes : Illustration: My thoughts/Connections : Important Points for Presentation : Important Dates, Names, Words:Sources/Citations: Front of CardBack of Card More Tools for Teaching Content Literacy by Dr. Janet Allen. © Stenhouse Publishers

40 R ole water droplet A udience residents of my neighborhood F ormat persuasive narrative about the water cycle T opic Encourage more eco-friendly and efficient water usage RAFT Writing Tools for Teaching Content Literacy by Dr. Janet Allen. © Stenhouse Publishers

41 What’s working in this piece of writing? What’s not working? What’s most getting in the way for the reader? Plan of action for the writer: Assessing the Reading-Writing Connection Plugged-in to Reading by Dr. Janet Allen. Triumph Learning

42 Note-taking, Organizing, & Retrieving Information

43 Ex ample P urpose L anguage O rganization R elate E valuate EXPLORE More Tools for Teaching Content Literacy by Dr. Janet Allen. © Stenhouse Publishers

44 Triple-entry Journal Significant to me... (text, visuals, layout, features) Made me wonder/think about... (questions, responses, reflections, connections, commentary) After more reading & discussion, I now think... More Tools for Teaching Content Literacy by Dr. Janet Allen. © Stenhouse Publishers.

45 Book Pass Each student has a book in front of them. First, fill out the Title and Author columns. Now, preview the text. Write comments in the space provided. Do you want to read this book? Rank or rate the book based on your interest in reading it. After 2 – 3 minutes, everyone will pass their book. Continue until everyone has viewed all of the books.

46 Book Pass TitleAuthorComments/Ranking

47 What does it look like in language arts? What does it look like in science? What does it look like in Social Studies/History? What does it look like in P.E.? What does it look like in math? What does it look like in the arts? concept Cross-Content Concept Ladder

48 Cross-content connections Tools for teaching concept Asse ssment/Demonstration of leaning Purpose for teaching Content-area Applications Content-specific concept Cross- content concept Content-specific Concept Ladder

49 Developing Effective Practices in _________________. INCREASEDECREASE

50 Judith A. Langer. (2000). Beating the Odds: Teaching Middle and High School Students to Read and Write Well. American Education Research Journal, 38(4) , Winter 2001.


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