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Quality Standards in Teacher Education Professor Ian R. Haslam, Dean, Bahrain Teachers College, University of Bahrain, Kingdom of Bahrain.

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Presentation on theme: "Quality Standards in Teacher Education Professor Ian R. Haslam, Dean, Bahrain Teachers College, University of Bahrain, Kingdom of Bahrain."— Presentation transcript:

1 Quality Standards in Teacher Education Professor Ian R. Haslam, Dean, Bahrain Teachers College, University of Bahrain, Kingdom of Bahrain

2 In the UAE in 1999 it was well known that there are: Unclear and conflicting mission and goals inappropriate methods of teaching and learning Inflexible curricula and programs high drop out rates Inadequate resources for research Problems in school management Gap between quality graduates and the labor market And in 2010 little appears to have changed Insufficient capabilities among principals and teachers Underdeveloped curricula and pedagogy Unreliable assessment & performance management Diverse learning environment Difficulties in renewing the school model Undefined governance Mograby, A. (1999) Human Development in the Emirates: Indicators and Challenges. In Education and the Arab World: Challenges of the Next Millenium. ECSSR: Abu Dhabi, UAE A decade of education reform ADEC 2010 New School Model ppt: Abu Dhabi, UAE

3 Student achievement “.. rates continue to disappoint and there is widespread concern in the region that educational investments have not yielded the intended – and expected – learning outcomes. Indeed poor quality has become the Achilles’ heel of education in the Arab world, a flaw that undermines its quantitative achievements.” And “teachers are increasingly viewed as the key issue” “Teachers mediate student access to content and control classroom activities most directly related to learning. As such, they have the greatest influence on student achievement.” (p313) …quality has become the Achilles heel of education Chapman and Miric (2009). Education Quality in the Middle East.International Review of Education.55: )

4 Student achievement “.. the MENA region is facing what many view as an educational crisis.” (p313) “..rates continue to disappoint and there is widespread concern in the region that educational investments have not yielded the intended – and expected – learning outcomes” (p314). and “teachers are increasingly viewed as the key issue” The dilemma is that “across MENA many of the teacher related interventions aimed at approving student learning (e.g. adequate staffing, well trained teachers and relatively good working conditions) have already taken place, yet student achievement continues to lag behind other regions” (319) …the paradox is that Chapman and Miric (2009). Education Quality in the Middle East. International Review of Education.55: )

5 According to national standards “Lack of formal training (at least of the length and type now mandated by governments in the region) does not appear to be the main reason why students are performing poorly” (p323) This might suggest: “ ineffective teacher education programs….imparting the wrong information…(and if they are imparting the right information), that they are not being allowed to use it in the classroom.” (p323). Or a combination of these. are plentiful and qualified… Chapman and Miric (2009). Education Quality in the Middle East.International Review of Education.55: )

6 Feel there is a disconnect “ between rhetoric and reality is one of the reasons for failure of prior (standards based education) reforms” (P1) And that raising content and performance standards “would require fundamental changes in instructional practices, capacity building and teachers professional development were seen as key ingredients in support of reforms.” (6) “clear and challenging content standards and a coherent structure of state leadership that would provide long term support to enable more fundamental changes in instruction.” (p1) But in-service teachers Shepard, L., Hannaway, J., and Baker E. (2009). Standards, Assessment and Accountability Education Policy White Paper National Academy of Education.

7 6 Standards based reform “Teachers and school administrators must be held accountable for their part in improving student learning ” (P7) But so too the regulatory body should be “the regulatory body should also be held accountable for the professional development and support they provide teachers and schools to reach higher standards.” (p7) NOT pre-service education MUST be the main focus of Shepard, L., Hannaway, J., and Baker E. (2009). Standards, Assessment and Accountability Education Policy White Paper National Academy of Education.

8 7 effective (CPD) can neither be brief nor superficial. “ Effective programs…those that changed teaching practices and improved student outcomes- focused on both content knowledge and particular aspects of content mastery related to student learning; they were coherently linked to curricular expectations, involved sustained participation over long periods of time and allowed teachers the opportunity to try new methods in the content of their own practice (p6) and initial teacher training must ensure “curriculum familiarity and supervised opportunities to gain experience with specific classroom practices account for significant differences in effectiveness of first year teachers.” (p6) Capacity building Shepard, L., Hannaway, J., and Baker E. (2009). Standards, Assessment and Accountability Education Policy White Paper National Academy of Education.

9 Specialist in training (5) Senior professional specialist (7) Education specialist (8) Senior education specialist (9) Professional specialist (6) Headmaster (7) Senior Headmaster (8) District Head (9) Teaching assistant (1) Assistant teacher (2) Teacher in training (3) Certified teacher (4) Certified teacher (5) Professional teacher (6) Senior teacher (7) Consultant teacher (8) Assistant headmaster (6) Senior assistant headmaster (7) BEd QTS PGDE QTS MAT CPDL MAT Science MAT Math MAT English MAT Arabic MEd ICT MEd Spec Ed MEd Early Child MEd Leadership EdD PhD Starts with a cadre

10 9 Certified teacher (4) Certified teacher (5) Professional teacher (6) Senior teacher (7) Consultant teacher (8) EdD (66ch) CPD 270 hrs 6ch MAT (36ch) CPD hrs CPD 270 hrs 6ch Years Start Masters MAT Teaching and Learning Start Doctorate EdD complete 9 PMS x CPD The Profession The Curriculum The Classroom The Community Professional Attributes Professional skills Subject matter knowledge  Doctoral Degree in Teaching and Learning from a recognized University.  Recognized Teaching Qualification  Minimum of 8 years continual teaching experience.  920 hrs PMS guided MOE CPD (5yrs x 90 hrs)  Minimum IELTS 7.0 Minimum APT Band 9  Bachelors Degree from a recognized University;  Recognized Teaching Qualification  Minimum IELTS (Academic) Band 6.5  Minimum Band 7 on the Arabic Proficiency test (APT) f  Masters Degree in Teaching & Learning from a recognized University.  Recognized Teaching Qualification  Minimum of 5 years continual teaching experience.  450 hrs PMS guided MOE CPD (5yrs x 90 hrs)  Minimum IELTS 6.5 Minimum APT Band 8 Establishes entry level standards

11 10 Curriculum Modules Pedagogy Training Hours Professional Skills BTC MAT (CPD) Core Module BTC’s CPD Teaching Fellows MOE T and D 100 teachers with 20 teachers in a class with English at an IELTS 6.5 or equivalent BTC Professors Mentor Teaching Fellows Specialis t Track Coordination BTC CPD Coordinator Then moves to implementation Master Training Course Training Domains Primary Teache r Track Secondary Teacher Track School Leader Track EvaluationEthics 45 hrs30 hrs45 hrs21 hrs9 hrs


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