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Carnegie Learning | www.carnegielearning.com Solving for x’s and why’s: Bringing Cognitive Science into the Math Classroom Kevin Judd Western Regional.

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Presentation on theme: "Carnegie Learning | www.carnegielearning.com Solving for x’s and why’s: Bringing Cognitive Science into the Math Classroom Kevin Judd Western Regional."— Presentation transcript:

1 Carnegie Learning | Solving for x’s and why’s: Bringing Cognitive Science into the Math Classroom Kevin Judd Western Regional Vice President Carnegie Learning, Inc.® South Dakota Laptop Institute 2007

2 Carnegie Learning | Welcome

3 Carnegie Learning | Learning by Doing “We learn by doing – that is the thing. For though you think you know it, you have no certainty until you try.” - Sophocles, 270 B.C.

4 Carnegie Learning | Sources  How People Learn and How Students Learn from the National Research Council – John Bransford  Larry Lowery from Lawrence Lab at Berkeley and FOSS  Al Corbett, John Anderson and Steve Ritter at Carnegie Mellon University  The Teaching Gap by James Stigler and James Weisert.

5 Carnegie Learning | “How People Learn” research  Learners use what they already know to construct new understandings. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience and School Bransford, J.D., Brown, A.L.& Cooking, R.R. (Eds) 1999, National Academy Press.

6 Carnegie Learning | An example of prior knowledge: HOUSE “How People Learn” research

7 Carnegie Learning | “How People Learn” research  Learning with understanding is enhanced when new knowledge is built on the major concepts of a discipline. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience and School Bransford, J.D., Brown, A.L.& Cooking, R.R. (Eds) 1999, National Academy Press.

8 Carnegie Learning |  Learners take control of their learning with metacognitive strategies. Write a sentence describing how you found these answers. You will be expected to share your answers with the class. Explain to your partner how you got your answer “How People Learn” research

9 Carnegie Learning |  Learners must be actively engaged. “How People Learn” research

10 Carnegie Learning |  Learners’ motivation and sense of self affect what and how much they will learn. “How People Learn” research

11 Carnegie Learning | “How People Learn” research  Learners utilize different approaches, strategies and styles based upon individual learning opportunities and prior experiences. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience and School Bransford, J.D., Brown, A.L.& Cooking, R.R. (Eds) 1999, National Academy Press.

12 Carnegie Learning | “How People Learn” research

13 Carnegie Learning | “How People Learn” research  Learners cement learning through the use of distributive practice (vs. mass practice). How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience and School Bransford, J.D., Brown, A.L.& Cooking, R.R. (Eds) 1999, National Academy Press.

14 Carnegie Learning | Social interactions enhance learning. “How People Learn” research

15 Carnegie Learning | “How People Learn” research  Learning is situated in activity and is shaped by the context and culture in which it occurs. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience and School Bransford, J.D., Brown, A.L.& Cooking, R.R. (Eds) 1999, National Academy Press.

16 Carnegie Learning | Context is important

17 Carnegie Learning | Context is important

18 Carnegie Learning | Context is important

19 Carnegie Learning | Result-unknown Problems 1. Story When Ted got home from his waiter job, he took the $81.90 he earned that day and subtracted the $66 he received in tips. Then he divided the remaining money by the 6 hours he worked and found his hourly wage. How much per hour does Ted make? 2. Word-equation Starting with 81.9, if I subtract 66 and then divide by 6, I get a number. What is it? 3. Equation ( ) / 6 = x Result-unknown Problems 1. Story When Ted got home from his waiter job, he took the $81.90 he earned that day and subtracted the $66 he received in tips. Then he divided the remaining money by the 6 hours he worked and found his hourly wage. How much per hour does Ted make? 2. Word-equation Starting with 81.9, if I subtract 66 and then divide by 6, I get a number. What is it? 3. Equation ( ) / 6 = x Start-unknown Problems 4.Story When Ted got home from his waiter job, he multiplied his hourly wage by the 6 hours he worked that day. Then he added the $66 he made in tips and found he earned $ How much per hour does Ted make? 5. Word-equation Starting with some number, if I multiply it by 6 and then add 66, I get What number did I start with? 6. Equation 6x + 66 = Start-unknown Problems 4.Story When Ted got home from his waiter job, he multiplied his hourly wage by the 6 hours he worked that day. Then he added the $66 he made in tips and found he earned $ How much per hour does Ted make? 5. Word-equation Starting with some number, if I multiply it by 6 and then add 66, I get What number did I start with? 6. Equation 6x + 66 = Cognitive Analysis

20 Carnegie Learning | Result-unknownStart-unknown Equation Word-equation Story problem Number Correct Koedinger, K.R., & Tabachneck, H.J.M. (1995). Verbal reasoning as a critical component in early algebra. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco, CA. Results

21 Carnegie Learning | Example of basic cognitive research Logical Reasoning  Fact:  All cards have letter on one side and number on the other  Rule:  If there’s a vowel on one side, there’s an odd number on the other side.  Question:  Which card(s) do you turn over to verify the rule?

22 Carnegie Learning | Example of basic cognitive research  Fact:  All cards represent people - the person’s drink is on one side, age is on the other.  Rule:  If the person is drinking alcohol, he or she must be over 21  Question:  Which card(s) do you turn over to verify the rule?

23 Carnegie Learning | Example of basic cognitive research  Rule: If X then Y  To verify, check X and not Y

24 Carnegie Learning | 1. Multisensory – 1st hand experience 2. Pictorial – Video, photo, diagram, etc… 3. Symbolic – Reading, solving equations, etc… “How People Learn” research

25 Carnegie Learning | “How People Learn” research Skills or Subjects???  Skills:  Examples - piano, multiplication tables, reading  Generally learned by practice.  Subjects:  Examples – social studies, art, mathematics  Generally learned by rehearsals.

26 Carnegie Learning | Expert – Novice studies  Experts recognize relationships better.  Experts generalize better.  Experts notice details better.  Experts have a tremendous amount of prior knowledge in the area of their expertise.  Experts are not more intelligent.  All people can become experts.  Experts often can not explain their expertise to novices (Expert Blind Spot).

27 Carnegie Learning | What’s important to learn?

28 Carnegie Learning | Teaching Math– the current state  Typical class  Warm-up, check homework  Demonstrate a procedure with definitions  Students practice the procedure  Homework  80% of the mathematics concepts are only stated not developed  95% of seatwork engaged in practicing routine procedures

29 Carnegie Learning | Unskilled 60% Skilled 20% Professional 20% Skilled 65% Unskilled 15% Professional 20% National Summit on 21 st Century Skills for 21 st Century Jobs Ramifications – skill level changes

30 Carnegie Learning | Ramifications in student performance  Typical urban school system  15,346 9 th graders,  9, th graders,  8, th graders, and  6, th graders  67% of African-American students and 77% of Hispanic students failed the mathematics state assessment

31 Carnegie Learning | Another Urban System Grade Number of Students % of 9 th Graders 968, % 1052,317 76% 1138,908 57% 1228,132 41%

32 Carnegie Learning | Potential Earnings by Educational Attainment Education Attained Unemployment RateMedian Earnings in 2001 Less than HS8.5%$22,350 HS grad5.3%$29,187 Some college4.8%$34,340 Associate4.0%$36,399 Bachelors3.1%$46,969 Masters2.8%$56,589 Doctorate1.6%$75,182 Professional1.6%$82,421 Bureau of Labor Statistics

33 Carnegie Learning | Back to the Future in Mathematics Education – Lynn Steen, Ed Week 4/7/04  Recent reports dealing with the mathematical expectations of higher education and the world of work show that little has changed in the last 20 years. (Since A Nation at Risk)  Only two out of three students graduate from HS with three years of HS math  Only two out of three students graduate from HS which means least than 50% of HS graduates meet the standard set by A Nation at Risk.

34 Carnegie Learning | NAEP 2005 Math Assessment 4 th Graders Scoring At or Above Proficient 36 percent of all students 19 percent of Hispanic students 13 percent of African-American students 19 percent of low-income students Ramifications

35 Carnegie Learning | NAEP 2005 Math Assessment 8 th Graders Scoring At or Above Proficient 30 percent of all students 13 percent of Hispanic students 9 percent of African-American students 13 percent of low-income students Ramifications – who’s successful?

36 Carnegie Learning | The Solution?

37 Carnegie Learning | The Real Solution Aligning teaching to learning Vs. Making learning align with teaching

38 Carnegie Learning | Solving problems to learn mathematics Vs. Learning procedures to solve problems The Real Solution

39 Carnegie Learning | Carnegie’s Curriculum Problem Solving Procedures  Students LEARN math by DOING math  Students KNOW more than they SHOW  Students should never ask THE question  Reverse the traditional approach Real World Problem Solving

40 Carnegie Learning | Carnegie Learning’s Solutions  Bridge To Algebra  Algebra I  Geometry  Algebra II  Integrated Mathematics I  Integrated Mathematics II  Integrated Mathematics III  Professional Development  Pedagogical  Mathematical Content

41 Carnegie Learning | Classroom Curriculum Classroom – 3 days per week (60%)  Collaborative learning  Conversations about mathematics  Writing about mathematics  Student presentations Real World Problem Solving

42 Carnegie Learning | Task 2: For this problem we will need to clearly identify the problem situation, produce a table of values, construct a graph, and find an algebraic rule. Your teacher will be giving your group overlays for you to put your answers on to share with the class. share table of values with the class. algebraic rule. graph, problem situation, Classroom Curriculum Task 1: Answer the following questions using complete sentences. 1.How much would you charge for an order of 3 shirts? 10 shirts? 100 shirts? Write a sentence describing how you found these answers. 2.How many shirts could a customer purchase with $50? $100? $1000? $52.50? Write a sentence describing how you found these answers. 1.How much would you charge for an order of 3 shirts? 10 shirts? 100 shirts? Write a sentence describing how you found these answers. 2.How many shirts could a customer purchase with $50? $100? $1000? $52.50? Write a sentence describing how you found these answers. Your job at U.S. Shirts is to calculate costs for various t- shirt orders. For each order, U. S. Shirts charges $8 per shirt plus a one time set up charge of $15. complete sentences.

43 Carnegie Learning | Bridge to Algebra

44 Carnegie Learning | Computer Curriculum Computer Lab – 2 days per week (40%)  Students discovering mathematics  Coaching by intelligent Tutor  One-on-one student-Tutor relationship  Teacher spends time with students who need it most Real World Problem Solving

45 Carnegie Learning | Computer Curriculum

46 Carnegie Learning | Five “Dos” to help students learn  Do make students “do the math”  Do let students struggle  Do use word walls  Do create student work walls  Do provide students with ample classroom time to do presentations of their solutions

47 Carnegie Learning | Five “Don’ts” to help students learn  Don’t give students answers – always answer a question with a question  Don’t make assumptions about levels of difficulty or levels of ease  Don’t help students “set up” problem solving tasks  Don’t keep students from working together - allow students to assist each other  Don’t let students give short answers - require students to write all answers in complete sentences

48 Carnegie Learning | Thank you! Kevin Judd x477


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