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CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC 2008.

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Presentation on theme: "CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC 2008."— Presentation transcript:

1 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC 2008

2 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC International Safety Management Code as amended 2002

3 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Development of the ISM Code A number of very serious accidents which occurred during the late 1980's, were manifestly caused by human errors, with management faults also identified as contributing factors.

4 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Herald of Free Enterprise One of these accidents was the capsize of the ferry “Herald of Free Enterprise” on the 6th March 1987, killing 193 passengers and crew. The prime reason for the accident was that the bow doors were left open when the ships sailed. The water rushed in, made the vessel unstable and she rolled over.

5 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Herald of Free Enterprise The crew member who was expected to close the doors was asleep during his break, and the First Officer who was supervising the car deck, was ordered to the bridge for sailing. The bow doors could not be seen from the bridge, and there were no indicator lights, so the Captain assumed the doors were closed.

6 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Herald of Free Enterprise

7 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Herald of Free Enterprise Lord Justice Sheen in his inquiry into the loss of the Herald of Free Enterprise, famously described the management failures as "the disease of sloppiness” and identified negligence at every level of the corporation's hierarchy.

8 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Development of the ISM Code

9 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Development of the ISM Code At its 16th Assembly in October 1989, IMO adopted resolution A.647(16), Guidelines on Management for the Safe Operation of Ships and for Pollution Prevention.

10 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Development of the ISM Code The purpose of these Guidelines was to provide those responsible for the operation of vessels with a framework for the proper development, implementation and assessment of safety and pollution prevention management in accordance with good practice.

11 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Development of the ISM Code The objective was to ensure safety, to prevent human injury or loss of life, and to avoid damage to the marine environment, and to property.

12 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Development of the ISM Code The Guidelines were based on general principles and objectives so as to promote evolution of sound management and operating practices within the shipping industry as a whole.

13 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Development of the ISM Code The Guidelines recognized the importance of the existing international instruments as the most important means of preventing maritime casualties and pollution of the sea and included sections on management and the importance of a safety and environmental policy.

14 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Development of the ISM Code After some experience in the use of the Guidelines, in 1993 IMO adopted the International Management Code for the Safe Operation of Ships and for Pollution Prevention (the ISM Code).

15 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Development of the ISM Code In 1998, the ISM Code became mandatory, for deep sea vessels.

16 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC ISM Code The Code establishes safety-management objectives and requires a safety management system (SMS) to be established by "the Company", which is defined as the shipowner or any person, who has assumed responsibility for operating the ship.

17 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC ISM Code The Company is then required to establish and implement a policy for achieving these objectives. This includes providing the necessary resources and shore-based support.

18 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC ISM Code Every company is expected "to designate a person or persons ashore having direct access to the highest level of management". The procedures required by the Code should be documented and compiled in a Safety Management Manual.

19 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Non Conformances / Observations Major Non Conformance – Issues where corrective action must be carried out immediately to meet the ISM Code, failure to do so would result in the withdrawal of the Safety Management Certificate and/or the Company Document of Compliance.

20 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Non Conformances / Observations Non Conformances – Issues where corrective action must be made to meet the ISM Code and/or ensure that the Procedures in the Safety Management System onboard are being followed correctly. Time limited.

21 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Non Conformances / Observations Observations – Issues where improvements in the Safety Management System and procedures are recommended. These do not have to be complied with, however they should be considered.

22 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Has ISM worked It is hard so say precisely whether ISM has worked. However it certainly has contributed to the fact that the number of ships over 100 GRT lost at sea has reduced year on year, and the number of seafarers lives that have been lost annually has dropped since 1996.

23 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC The reduction in the number of vessels losses Relatively few vessels actually sink at sea. The vast majority of the following "losses" simply refer to ships which are damaged and "written off" by the hull insurers as being beyond economical repair - described by underwriters as "total constructive losses".

24 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC The figures below cover the entire global industry and indicate the steady improvement in safety performance since the 1990s.

25 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Lives lost at sea ( ) As in all transport sectors, lives are sadly lost as a result of accidents. However, the loss of life in shipping is in fact relatively modest, and the overall trend is one of reduction in the number of fatalities, which is all the more impressive in view of the growth in the number of ships in the world fleet.

26 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC The figures below relate to lives lost on cargo vessels and cover the entire international industry, which employs over one and a quarter million people, plus many more employed in coastal trades.

27 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC How Does This Affect the CCGA P?

28 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC How Does This Affect the CCGA P? Whilst the International Safety Management Code only applies to ships on international trade, various ship operators in Canada have voluntarily adopted, either because it is seen as a good idea, or because events in those companies have made it expedient to do so. As a result, for example, both the Canadian Coast Guard and BC Ferries have their own Safety Management Systems.

29 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Queen of Oak Bay Auxiliary 1

30 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Queen of the North

31 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Canadian Coast Guard The Fast Rescue Craft "G.R.1", dispatched in response to an urgent SAR call, struck a rock at about 0140 at a speed of approximately 30 knots. All three crew were thrown from the boat and projected over the rock, landing in the water on the opposite side. The boat, carried by momentum, flew through the air some 18m and came to rest at the water's edge also on the other side.

32 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary The CCGA (P) are not immune from accidents, and recently have had: –two persons fall overboard. –one of our vessels went aground due to loss of situational awareness by the entire crew. –one of our vessels suffered a cockpit window break when stuffing the bow in bad weather, flooding the cockpit

33 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC The Safety Management System

34 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC The Safety Management System We have been requested by Canadian Coast Guard to put in place a Safety Management System. The system documents are to be found on our web site, under Document Library, and Safety Management pacific.org/ccga-p/library/?action =category&lcid=15

35 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC The Safety Management System The basic requirement for a Safety Management System is “write down what you do, and then do what is written down”.

36 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC The Safety Management System The CCGA (P) already had many of the policies, procedures and standing instructions required for a Safety Management System, but just not formalised in one suite of documents.

37 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC The Safety Management System The system covers the following subjects Policy and Procedures SAR Operations Human Resources Training Contingency Plans Personal Safety Environmental Protection Forms & Checklists MaintenanceCommunicationsPurchasing Non Conformances & Observations

38 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC The Safety Management System The biggest changes are: Use of checklists to minimise errors by omission, whether during routine operations or during emergencies to own vessel. The active encouragement to report accidents, and non conformances to promote continuous improvement.

39 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Accident Reporting Accidents to our personnel and vessels can often be caused by mistakes or errors which can reveal omissions or mistakes in operating instructions, training procedures. By encouraging stations to report these in a “no blame” environment, we can find those omissions or mistakes and put in place improvements, and promulgate them to reduce the chance of a future re-occurrence.

40 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Record Keeping Formalise the keeping of records. This is a large part achieved by the SAR Management System, which keep records for: –the training and certification of our volunteers. –the operation of the vessels

41 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Lessons Learned Part of the system is a section online on Lessons Learned. This is a summary of accidents that occur, and identifying procedures that could have prevented that accident, including new recommendations that may be necessary. Whenever possible the station is not identified, (although the accident report may reveal this) and names are never to be used.

42 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Audits Periodic audits of stations, station personnel and vessels by CCGA (P) staff will be required to ensure that the policies, procedures and standing instructions are being followed. There will also be audits by an approved external agency.

43 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Results and Benefits

44 CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Results and Benefits The result and benefits of the proper operation of the system will be: –increased reporting of accidents –detailed investigation of accidents and publication of lessons learned –reduction of accidents (and insurance?) –improved and formalised record keeping –consistency of operations across the region


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