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Lesson #11 If you’re really determined to Google… Topic: Teacher: Grade: Date: Period(s): Bloom’s Taxonomy Level: Relationship to Current Content in Regular.

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Presentation on theme: "Lesson #11 If you’re really determined to Google… Topic: Teacher: Grade: Date: Period(s): Bloom’s Taxonomy Level: Relationship to Current Content in Regular."— Presentation transcript:

1 Lesson #11 If you’re really determined to Google… Topic: Teacher: Grade: Date: Period(s): Bloom’s Taxonomy Level: Relationship to Current Content in Regular Classroom: (*) Indicates a modification or accomodation

2 Learning Target I can evaluate web sites for reliability.

3 AASL/ Common Core Crosswalk Use prior and background knowledge as context for new learning Maintain a critical stance by questioning the validity and accuracy of all information. CC L.6 Vocabulary Acquisition and Use: Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. CC W.8 Research to Build and Present Knowledge: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

4 Vocabulary.edu.tv.org.gov.biz Bias agenda

5 Agenda 1.When you are test driving a car, which items are you mainly looking for? Which items will a car dealer throw in to distract you from noticing important details. 2.When “test-driving” a web site, which items are you looking for to make sure the web site is truthful? 3.Show the slides at the end of this lesson plan to clarify items to look for when “test-driving” a web site. 4.Have students, as a class, evaluate a web site. 5.Have students do an independent Google search for a class project, taking Cornell notes, citing the web site, and evaluating the reliability of the web site via the exit ticket. *Visual demonstrations *Presentation of material in small steps *One-to-one contact

6 Rubric Noteworthy The student cited the web page and created a T chart listing 3 positive and 3 negative aspects of the site. Developing The student cited the web page and created a T chart listing 1 positive and 1 negative aspect of the site. Acceptable The student cited the web page and created a T chart listing 2 positive and 2 negative aspects of the site. Not Ready The student did not evaluate the web site.

7 Time for Browsing, Silent Reading, nd Book Checkout *Clearly defined limits *Seating to reduce distractions

8 Exit Ticket Here is the citation for the web site:

9 The following slides may be of use for this lesson.

10 From WEBSITE RELIABILITY CHECKLIST Use this 5-point checklist to evaluate websites for reliability. It will help you decide whether a particular site is worthy of inclusion in a college-level research paper. 1) VALIDITY a) Who is the author(s) of the site? Look for their credentials. b) Is contact information provided? The author should be accountable for her/his work. c) Is there a link provided to their homepage? Look for a reliable institution. d) What is the first part (major domain) of the web address (URL)? This indicates the site's origin:.com = commercial.edu = education.org = non-profit organization.gov = government.mil = military.cu = Cuba (.it = Italy, etc.) ~ usually means an individual maintains the site (as opposed to an institution).

11 2) CURRENCY a) When was the site last updated? A reliable site is frequently revised and improved. b) When was the site first created? A site's longevity is a clue to its stability.

12 3) CONTENT a) What is the depth and breadth of the information offered? Be wary of too much or too little. b) Are there links to other useful and reliable sites? They should be relevant to the subject matter. c) Is the site relevant to your needs? It is important to maintain your focus. d) How is the site structured? If there are functions such as an in-site index or table of contents they should assist with navigating the information. e) Does the advertising overpower the content? It shouldn't.

13 4) PURPOSE a) Is this site trying to persuade you? Educate you? Market a product? For instance, a.com site may try sell you something whereas an.edu site most often exists for the sake of education. b) Are there any biases that might be promoted: racial, gender, religious, or other types? Even non-profit.org sites may be biased.

14 5) ACCURACY a) How can you ensure the information is precise, authoritative, and current? The author should cite the sources used. Look for

15 Let’s evaluate a web site. The web site I chose, based upon the following evidence is/is not reliable. Good things Things that concern me

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