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MASTERY AND MODULARIZATION USING THE EMPORIUM MODEL SOUTHWESTERN OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE Billie Shannon.

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Presentation on theme: "MASTERY AND MODULARIZATION USING THE EMPORIUM MODEL SOUTHWESTERN OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE Billie Shannon."— Presentation transcript:

1 MASTERY AND MODULARIZATION USING THE EMPORIUM MODEL SOUTHWESTERN OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE Billie Shannon

2 WHAT LED TO OUR MODULAR APPROACH Pass rates 40 – 55% in developmental math classes Students passing basic math and elementary algebra without strong skills  Fractions  Graphing  Factoring Course expectations not consistent among instructors  Close to 50% of basic math and elementary algebra sections taught by part- time instructors Led to high failure rates in Math 94 Previously looked at what others schools were trying  Many configurations did not work with smaller FTE

3 NCAT CONFERENCE Sent to NCAT Conference February 2011 Emporium Model looked like a model that could solve some of our problems  Mastery Based Catches students who failed one topic and still managed to pass class Students move forward when they were ready  Modular Allows students to accelerate through topics they already have mastered  Just-in-Time learning Opportunity for individualized instruction Hear what they need to hear when they are ready to hear it

4 MODULAR FORMAT Our basic premise is spending some time in a classroom with most time spent in a math lab  Allows for lots of one-on-one instruction when a student is ready to hear what they need to know Colorado has been at the forefront of developmental education redesign  In the Educational Delivery Strategies Video, Lindsey Small, a math faculty member In Colorado, has discussed the idea of teaching in a modular formatEducational Delivery Strategies Video “As the instructor I no longer am standing at the board. I am now an instructor at an individual level. So someone raises their hand, wherever they are, in whichever course they are in, that is what I’m going to instruct about.” education/overview.html

5 THE BEGINNING Worked with faculty throughout spring 2011  Agreement was not unanimous  Required willingness to try something new Worked with software vendors over summer 2011 to select a package that would meet our requirements  Mastery approach to learning  Easy to use  Maximum software support  Cost to students  Assessment

6 A LITTLE HISTORY CASE Grant awarded October 2011  Funded Math Learning Center infrastructure  Funded Math Learning Center aides Partially implemented Fall/Winter Quarters instructor paced  3 Lecture/1 Lab weekly – Math 20 Fall Quarter 2011  3 Lecture/1 Lab weekly – Math 20 and 70 Winter Quarter 2012 Allowed faculty to become more familiar with software Allowed faculty to develop and evaluate testing Spring 2012 began the 3/1 model

7 MATH LEARNING CENTER LAYOUT

8 FALL 2012 Equipment purchased through the CASE grant delivered and installed prior to fall term  Approximately 45 work stations with room for additional student laptops  Students welcome any time we are open Students in class take priority Rare that we have had to turn anyone away

9 RESULTS  Still want to improve pass rates  Number of students receiving A’s and B’s significantly increased  Students completed who had started in the spring or summer  Many students who did not finish completed three to four modules  Continued following term

10 Increased 11% over average of the last six years Increased 7% over the prior year MATH 94 PASS RATES IMPACT

11 STILL A LEARNING EXPERIENCE  Trying new ideas constantly Study skills Note taking Limit number of tests student can take/retake in one day Math notebook Overview handouts Posters In-MLC work sessions

12 POSITIVE NOTES  Math 94 pass rate up  Student on our Brookings campus who had never succeeded in passing the math portion of the GED took Math 20 winter term Passed Math 20 and the GED  Winter term 20% of two sections of Math 70 had completed by week 7 Encouraged to work in modules that would help them in Math 94  Students who were one module short have been challenged by their instructor to complete the class over break Nearly all have returned, taken the last module test and final exam, and moved on to the next course One student stated that she never thought she could learn math and now she knew she could

13 STUDENT SUCCESS STORY  One student started Math 20 in fall 2012 with very poor math skills  Depended on a multiplication table and a prime number table  Was extremely persistent  Spent many hours in the MLC  Fall term finished one module  Winter term completed one module  Spring term completed four modules and completed Math 20  Is now in Math 70

14 KEEPING STUDENTS ON TRACK  Course checklist  Progress points  Time on Task reports Counsel students who are not putting in the time  s Automated Personal s from instructor  Early alert  Goal setting

15 REQUIRES FACULTY SUPPORT Essential that students get same message across the campus  It takes time and persistence to learn math  Spend at least 10 hours a week on math  Software is installed throughout the campus  When the MLC is closed use computers in the tutoring center in Randolph or Student Support Services  Students can work offline on their laptops even on a bus or at their son’s soccer practice  Students who are putting in the time are succeeding  Persistence is the biggest issue

16 STUDENT COMMENTS I really liked this class. Being able to sit down and work at my own pace from home helped a lot, and the option to get a more precise explanation from the instructors in the lab made learning the material much easier. I actually enjoyed the math lab class style. Even though sometimes it's difficult to do it on a computer, I didn't feel rushed or unprepared because I knew exactly what was going to be covered in each section and the test doesn't try and trick you by adding entirely different problems. This was the hardest class I have taken so far but I enjoyed it.

17 A TYPICAL DAY

18 STUDENT HELPING STUDENT

19 LOOKING TO THE FUTURE Have realigned entire math sequence Math 20 – 112 Will be implemented in fall 2014  Moving from Math 20/70/94/95 to 20/60/65/95 More linear progression Expect positive results Moving at least some sections of 65 into the MLC -Hoping some students will be able to progress at a faster rate

20 Mathematics Learning Center Committee  Billie Shannon (541)  Carol McKillip  Sean Hutcherson CASE Grant Staff  Alaine Jennings, Grant Manager  Jenny Silva, Grant Assistant Deans  Karen Helland-Domine  Rod Keller  Diana Schab Part-time MLC Faculty  Sandy Turner  Barbara Keller-Simpson  Paula Leifer  Jim Cowen MLC Aides  Annette Brainard  Mark Lawrence KUDOS “This workforce solution was funded by a grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration. The solution was created by the grantee and does not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Labor. The Department of Labor makes no guarantees, warranties or assurances of any kind, express or implied, with respect to such information on linked sites, and including, but not limited to, accuracy of the information or its completeness, timeliness, usefulness, adequacy, continued availability, or ownership.” (SGA, p. 15)


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